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DID YOU READ

Was Richard Pryor the greatest comedian of all time?

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I cannot wait to see the new Richard Pryor documentary, authorized by his estate. Jennifer Lee Pryor, Richard’s widow, is listed as a producer on the upcoming documentary “Richard Pryor: Omit the Logic,” which will premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival in mid-April. The fact that Pryor’s ex-wife is listed a producer on the project lends authenticity to the narrative of one of the most compelling figures in entertainment. When Richard Pryor died in 2005 at the young age of 65 of complications due to multiple sclerosis, he was regarded as probably the most influential American comedian of all time. As a monologist, he rivaled Mark Twain. It was the same self-destructive impluses that fueled his brilliant comedic imagination that led to his untimely demise.

Born on December 1, 1940 in Peoria, Illinois Richard Pryor’s career arc traversed the Civil Rights revolution and its aftermath. His influence in comedy – particularly during the 70s and 80s, where he was at the height of his powers — altered the DNA of comedy, at home and abroad. “It was essentially comedy without jokes – re-enactments of common human exchanges that not only mirrored the pretensions of the characters portrayed but also subtly revealed the minor triumphs that allowed them to endure and even prevail over the bleak realities of everyday living,” wrote Mel Watkins in his obituary in The New York Times. “He was brilliant at telling stories, and some people are brilliant at losing themselves,” comedian Paul Mooney, his collaborator for many years, told NPR. “That’s why Richard could play characters.”

Raised in a brothel and bars run by his grandmother, addicted for most of his adult life to cocaine, Pryor, who attained fabulous wealth in the United States during the post-Civil Rights era, lived both the American nightmare as well as the American Dream. His life served as rich soil in which he mined some of his most brilliant routines, dealing with everything from racism and inequality to drug addiction and fame. He excelled at creating hyper-realistic characters in the key of life — hustlers from black folklore to network bosses. Pryor was a pioneer of observational comedy, visiting clubs and bars with Mooney, capturing the body movements and influections as well as the stories that make up America. He began on the chitlin’ circuit — where the humor was blue — venturing afterwards to New York City, to pursue fame and fortune. In the 60s, Pryor modeled his career after Bill Cosby, who worked clean. Pryor’s comedic breakthrough came when he abandoned the clean sets of his idol and ventured into the dark side, expressing that zone of life with an organic, gritty humor. It was a side of life he intimately understood. By the 1970s Pryor had come into his comic persona — essentially himself — and ushered in a new era of American comedy, wholly without artifice and pretense.

As a dramatic actor Richard Pryor was immensely underrated. It is one of the great tragedies of American film that Pryor never did more dramas, never fully showed us his range as a performer. Comedically, Pryor was no stranger to Emmy’s, which he won for his collaboration with Lilly Tomlin, as well as the Grammy for Best Comedic Recording in 1974. His his supporting role in 1972’s Lady Sings the Blues, however, earned critical support of his dramatic ambitions. But it was his breakout dramatic performance in Paul Schrader’s Blue Collar in 1978, which unfortunately never won an Oscar nod or box office appreciation, that proved that Richard Pryor could do anything. Playing Zeke, a frustrated Detroit autoworker surviving paycheck-to-paycheck, caught between a corporation and a corrupt union, Pryor stars alongside Harvey Keitel and Yaphet Kotto in the logical dramatic extension of his realistic and gritty view of life. It is testament to the brilliance of Richard Pryor that he was able, almost alchemically, to transform so much pain into such timeless humor.

If this documentary captures even a fraction of the complexity of this man then it is more than worth the price of admission.

Are you interested in seeing “Richard Pryor: Omit the Logic”? Tell us in the comments section below or on Facebook and Twitter.

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The Best Of The Last

Portlandia Goes Out With A Bang

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The end is near. In mere days Portlandia wraps up its final season, and oh what a season it’s been. Lucky for you, you can watch the entire season right now right here and on the IFC app, including this free episode courtesy of Subaru.

But now, let’s take a moment to look back at some of the new classics Fred and Carrie have so thoughtfully bestowed upon us. (We’ll be looking back through tear-blurred eyes, but you do you.)

Couples Dinner

It’s not that being single sucks, it’s that you suck if you’re single.

Cancel it!

A sketch for anyone who has cancelled more appointments than they’ve kept. Which is everyone.

Forgotten America

This one’s a “Serial” killer…everything both right and wrong about true crime podcasts.

Wedding Planners

The only bad wedding is a boring wedding.

Disaster Hut

It’s only the end of the world if your doomsday kit doesn’t include rosé.

Catch up on Portlandia’s final episodes on demand and at IFC.com

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Your Portlandia Personality Test

The New Portlandia Webseries Is Going Your Way

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Carrie and Fred understand that although we have so much in common, we’re each so beautifully unique and different. To help us navigate those differences, Portlandia has found an easy and honest way to embrace our special selves in the form of a progressive new traffic system: a specific lane for every kind of driver. It’s all in honor of the show’s 8th and final season, and it’s all presented by Subaru.

Ready to find out who you really are? Match your personality to a lane and hop on the expressway to self-understanding.

Lane 10: Trucks Piled With Junk

Your junk is falling out of your trunk. Shake a tail light, people — this lane is for you.

Lane 33: Twins

You’re like a Gemini, but waaaay more pedestrian. Maybe you and a friend just wear the same outfits a lot. Who cares, it’s just twinning enough to make you feel special.

Lane 27: Broken Windows

Bad luck follows you around and everyone knows it. Your proverbial seat is always damp from proverbial rain. Is this the universe telling you to swallow your pride? Yes.

Lane 69: Filthy Cars

You’re all about convenience. Getting your car washed while you drive is a no-brainer.

Lane 43: Newly Divorced Singles

It’s been a while since you’ve driven alone, and you don’t know the rules of the road anymore. What’s too fast? What’s too slow? Are you sending the right signals? Don’t worry, the breakdown lane is nearby if you need it.

Still can’t find a lane to match your personality? Check out all the videos here. And see the final season of Portlandia this spring on IFC.

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Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

Hits from the '80s are on repeat all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC.

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GIFs via Giphy, Photos via The Everett Collection

It’s the final countdown to Christmas and thanks to IFC’s movie marathon all Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, you can revel in classic ’80s films AND find inspiration for your last-minute gifts. Here are our recommendations, if you need a head start:

Musical Instrument

Great analog entertainment substitute when you refuse to give your kid the Nintendo Switch they’ve been drooling over.

Breakfast In Bed

Any significant other or child would appreciate these Uncle Buck-approved flapjacks. Just make sure you’re not stuck on clean up duty.

Cocktail Supplies

You’ll need them to get through the holidays.

Dance Lessons

So you can learn to shake-shake-shake (unless you know ghosts willing to lend a hand).

Comfy Clothes

With all the holiday meals, there may be some…embigenning.



Get even more great inspiration all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC, and remember…