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Five signature Steven Soderbergh scenes

Five signature Steven Soderbergh scenes (photo)

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Tomorrow, if your germaphobia can handle it, you can go check out the latest movie from director Steven Soderbergh, the disease/disaster thriller “Contagion.” It’s definitely his latest; it may also be one of his last, since rumors about his potential retirement have been swirling since last December (this week, he started calling it “a sabbatical”).

In celebration of “Contagion,” and with the possibility of impending retirement on our minds, it seemed like a good time to look at some of the highlights from Steven Soderbergh’s career. There were a lot to choose from. We decided to pick five signature moments; may not the “best” moments, but the ones that immediately jumped to our minds when we thought of his work. If Soderbergh does retire next year, moments like these are what we’ll miss the most.

The Love Scene(s)
From “Out of Sight” (1998)

Though clearly inspired by the iconic sex scene in Nicolas Roeg’s “Don’t Look Now,” the chronologically fragmented encounter between George Clooney and Jennifer Lopez in “Out of Sight” stands on its own as an incredible sequence. In Roeg’s version, a couple’s lovemaking is intercut with their getting dressed for a dinner party later the same evening. For his version, Soderbergh reversed things; mixing a sex scene with an exchange between the characters from earlier the same evening. Jack (Clooney) and Karen (Lopez) flirt over a glass of bourbon in a bar overlooking snowy Detroit. When Jack touches Karen’s hand, Soderbergh jumps to the future, and a hotel room where Jack’s hand is now on Karen’s leg. The conversation in the bar continues on the soundtrack, while things heat up back in Karen’s bedroom. Roeg’s scene was the trailblazer, but Soderbergh’s scene is arguably sexier, despite the fact that it contains a lot less actual (simulated) sex. It’s all about glances and pauses and that sultry David Holmes score, and sparks of physical chemistry so powerful they’re capable of breaking the space-time continuum.


“You tell him I’m coming!”
From “The Limey” (1999)

When I think of Steven Soderbergh, I think of a director who tells conventional stories in unconventional ways. Though he’s made some truly eccentric films over his career, he’s also perfectly happy working in mainstream genres like biopics or crime stories. But whatever he makes, his unorthodox execution sets him apart. Take this classic example from early in the neo-noir “The Limey.” The movie is a revenge thriller, one of the most popular subgenres of action movies. So what does Soderbergh do in this scene? He leaves out the action. When Wilson (Terrence Stamp) goes into that building to repay the men who just roughed him up, the camera stays outside and the violence stays off-screen. We only hear what’s going on, and it doesn’t sound good. Not seeing Wilson destroy these three guys robs us of some of the satisfaction we expect to get in a revenge thriller. But it also creates a larger-than-life aura around Wilson as an unstoppable killer. And it does it in a highly unconventional way.

To watch this scene, go to YouTube. Below is the trailer for “The Limey.”


Julia Roberts Knows Every Phone Number Ever
From “Erin Brockovich” (2000)

I don’t know Steven Soderbergh as a person; I’ve never even met him. But based on his work in “Erin Brockovich,” I have to assume that he understands what it feels like to be underestimated. That’s what comes across so well in this scene, and in so many scenes from “Brockovich:” the character’s conviction that she belongs in this world despite the insistence of everyone around her that she does not. In scene after scene, her co-workers and colleagues diminish her work, but Brockovich (Julia Roberts) always gets the last laugh. When she puts this stuck-up snob down for her bad shoes, man does it feel good. Nowadays, Soderbergh’s widely regarded as a great director, and the mere mention of his possible retirement sends the media into a frenzy. But at some point in the past, someone must have spoken to Soderbergh the way that snob talks to Erin Brockovich. I wonder how he responded.


Movie Star Banter At Its Best
From “Ocean’s Eleven” (2001)

While Soderbergh rarely writes his own movies — his last credited screenplay is 2002’s “Solaris” — he is nonetheless a great director of dialogue. His remake of the Rat Pack classic “Ocean’s Eleven” is loaded with bombastic heist sequences, but the most memorable moment in the film is one of its simplest: a feisty encounter between Danny Ocean (Clooney) and his ex-wife Tess (Roberts). The scene is like an inversion of “Out of Sight”‘s seduction. The lighting is immaculate, the surroundings are glossy, and the stars are the most gorgeous human specimens on planet Earth. It’s the most romantic ambiance anyone could ever want. But all that’s left between the couple is bitterness. This one back-and-forth has more high quality zingers than some entire movies. “They tell me I paid my debt to society,” Danny says. “Funny, I don’t remember getting a check,” Tess snaps back. For scenes like this one, we’re the ones in debt, to the director.


The Corporate Culture’s Gonna Change A Little
from “The Informant!” (2009)

A lot of Soderbergh’s work reminds me of Karl Marx’s famous quote about history repeating itself, first as tragedy, then as farce. Soderbergh likes to repeat himself, first sincerely, then satirically. He makes “Erin Brockovich,” this serious story about an idealistic whistleblower whose exposes a major case of corporate malfeasance, then a decade later he makes “The Informant!” which basically makes fun of every movie ever made about idealistic whistleblowers who expose major cases of corporate malfeasance. Instead of Julia Roberts as Erin Brockovich, dogged crusader for the little guy, you have Matt Damon in paunch, bad hair, and worse mustache as Mark Whitacre, a man so hopelessly corrupt and mentally deranged that he’s planning to take over his company even as he’s helping the FBI spy on his fellow employees. In maybe the best scene in the film, Mark’s so focused on upward mobility he’s oblivious to the hard truths in front of him. He never realizes that, like his director, he may be headed for early retirement.


What’s your favorite scene from a Steven Soderbergh movie? Tell us in the comments section below or on Facebook and Twitter.

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Give Back

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

Hits from the '80s are on repeat all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC.

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GIFs via Giphy, Photos via The Everett Collection

It’s the final countdown to Christmas and thanks to IFC’s movie marathon all Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, you can revel in classic ’80s films AND find inspiration for your last-minute gifts. Here are our recommendations, if you need a head start:

Musical Instrument

Great analog entertainment substitute when you refuse to give your kid the Nintendo Switch they’ve been drooling over.

Breakfast In Bed

Any significant other or child would appreciate these Uncle Buck-approved flapjacks. Just make sure you’re not stuck on clean up duty.

Cocktail Supplies

You’ll need them to get through the holidays.

Dance Lessons

So you can learn to shake-shake-shake (unless you know ghosts willing to lend a hand).

Comfy Clothes

With all the holiday meals, there may be some…embigenning.



Get even more great inspiration all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC, and remember…

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A-O Rewind

Celebrating Portlandia One Sketch at a Time

The final season of Portlandia approaches.

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GIFs via Giphy

Most people measure time in minutes, hours, days, years…At IFC, we measure it in sketches. And nothing takes us way (waaaaaay) back like Portlandia sketches. Yes, there’s a Portlandia milepost from every season that changed the way we think, behave, and pickle things. In honor of Portlandia’s 8th and final season, Subaru presents a few of our favorites.

via GIPHY

Put A Bird On It

Portlandia enters the pop-culture lexicon and inspires us to put birds on literally everything.

Colin the Chicken

Who’s your chicken, really? Behold the emerging locavore trend captured perfectly to the nth degree.

Dream Of The ’90s

This treatise on Portland made it clear that “the dream” was alive and well.

No You Go

We Americans spend most of our lives in cars. Fortunately, there’s a Portlandia sketch for every automotive situation.

A-O River!

We learned all our outdoor survival skills from Kath and Dave.

One More Episode

The true birth of binge watching, pre-Netflix. And what you’ll do once Season 8 premieres.

Catch up on Portlandia’s best moments before the 8th season premieres January 18th on IFC.

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WTF Films

Artfully Off

Celebrity All-Star by Sisters Weekend is available now on IFC's Comedy Crib.

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Sisters Weekend isn’t like other comedy groups. It’s filmmaking collaboration between besties Angelo Balassone, Michael Fails and Kat Tadesco, self-described lace-front addicts with great legs who write, direct, design and produce video sketches and cinematic shorts that are so surreally hilarious that they defy categorization. One such short film, Celebrity All-Star, is the newest addition to IFC’s Comedy Crib. Here’s what they had to say about it in a very personal email interview…

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IFC: How would you describe Celebrity All-Star to a fancy network executive you just met in an elevator?

Celebrity All-Star is a short film about an overworked reality TV coordinator struggling to save her one night off after the cast of C-List celebrities she wrangles gets locked out of their hotel rooms.

IFC: How would you describe Celebrity All-Star to a drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?

Sisters Weekend: It’s this short we made for IFC where a talent coordinator named Karen babysits a bunch of weird c-list celebs who are stuck in a hotel bar. It’s everyone you hate from reality TV under one roof – and that roof leaks because it’s a 2-star hotel. There’s a magician, sexy cowboys, and a guy wearing a belt that sucks up his farts.

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IFC: What was the genesis of Celebrity All-Star?

Celebrity All-Star was born from our love of embarrassing celebrities. We love a good c-lister in need of a paycheck! We were really interested in the canned politeness people give off when forced to mingle with strangers. The backstory we created is that the cast of this reality show called “Celebrity All-Star” is in the middle of a mandatory round of “get to know each other” drinks in the hotel bar when the room keys stop working. Shows like Celebrity Ghost Hunters and of course The Surreal Life were of inspo, but we thought it
was funny to keep it really vague what kind of show they’re on, and just focus on everyone’s diva antics after the cameras stop rolling.

IFC: Every celebrity in Celebrity All-Star seems familiar. What real-life pop personalities did you look to for inspiration?

Sisters Weekend: Anyone who is trying to plug their branded merch that no one asked for. We love low-rent celebrity. We did, however, directly reference Kylie Jenner’s turd-raison lip color for our fictional teen celebutante Gibby Kyle (played by Mary Houlihan).

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IFC: Celebrity seems disgusting yet desirable. What’s your POV? Do you crave it, hate it, or both?

Sisters Weekend: A lot of people chase fame. If you’re practical, you’ll likely switch to chasing success and if you’re smart, you’ll hopefully switch to chasing happiness. But also, “We need money. We need hits. Hits bring money, money bring power, power bring fame, fame change the game,” Young Thug.

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IFC: Who are your comedy idols?

Sisters Weekend: Mike grew up renting “Monty Python” tapes from the library and staying up late to watch 2000’s SNL, Kat was super into Andy Kaufman and “Kids In The Hall” in high school, and Angelo was heavily influenced by “Strangers With Candy” and Anna Faris in the Scary Movie franchise, so, our comedy heroes mesh from all over. But, also we idolize a lot of the people we work with in NY-  Lorelei Ramirez, Erin Markey, Mary Houlihan, who are all in the film, Amy Zimmer, Ana Fabrega, Patti Harrison, Sam Taggart. Geniuses! All of Em!

IFC: What’s your favorite moment from the film?

Sisters Weekend: I mean…seeing Mary Houlihan scream at an insane Pomeranian on an iPad is pretty great.

See Sisters Weekend right now on IFC’s Comedy Crib

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