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“True Legend,” Reviewed

“True Legend,” Reviewed (photo)

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There’s nothing like a good martial arts movie like “True Legend” to make you feel inadequate as both a writer and an athlete. It’s bad enough to have to watch these men perform remarkable acts with impossible grace while you’re still sore from the mile you ran on the treadmill two days ago (I swear I have a six pack, you guys. It’s just nestled safely beneath a sixteen ounce bag of marshmallows). But then how do you explain what makes it great? You might as well try explaining a sunset to a man who’s lived in a cave his whole life. I envy the dance critic, who can write from their knowledge of technique, form, history, and context. As a film critic writing about martial arts I’m basically limited to oblique measures like wow factor and awesomeness.

Let it be said, though, that “True Legend,” from director and martial arts choreographer supreme Yuen Woo Ping, has plenty of wow factor and loads of awesomeness. After a thirty year career full of enough highlights to guarantee cinematic immortality, Yuen could make a movie like this in his sleep, but he pretty clearly didn’t. Directing his own choreography for the first time in fifteen years, Yuen brings an adventurous spirit to “True Legend.” The fact that he’s not content to merely rest on his laurels and rehash a couple of greatest hits is refreshing. Even if some of the new tricks don’t work, enough do that you’re glad he’s taking the risks.

His story is, indeed, a true Chinese legend about the man who invented the drunken fist style of martial arts. I suppose if you know this man, Su Can, a.k.a. Beggar Su (Vincent Zhao) dand his boozy tale, you might consider “True Legend” something of a prequel, since the film is mostly about Su’s adventures before he became a drunken boxer in 1860s China. At that time, Su was just another kung fu master with the physical gifts of a demigod. Happily married with a lovely wife (Zhou Xun) and son (Li Zo), his life is shattered by the return of his jealous stepbrother Yuan (Andy On), who has never forgiven his adopted father for killing his biological father (understandable, I suppose).

Now armed with the Five Venom Fist, a mystical punch that operates along the same principles as Bart Simpson’s Touch of Death, Yuan lashes out at Su and his family in an impressively varied series of action sequences. The big blowout of this portion of the film is a battle between Su and Yuan on a slippery deck above a waterfall. That’s where Yuan reveals his other secret weapon: body armor sewn right onto his skin. Yuan’s basically the most asskickingest emo rocker ever: his stepfather killed his real dad so he learned how to destroy people with a touch and sewed metal to his skin so no one could ever hurt him again. Oh, and he’s super pale, too. If he could have worked a reference to Weezer’s “Pinkerton” into his repertoire, he could have sold millions of albums ten years ago.

After Yuan throws Su across the sea and takes possession of his son, the physically and emotionally broken man must repair his body and rediscover his confidence. Along the way he meets cameoing superstars like Michelle Yeoh and Jay Chou, consumes gallons of rice wine, and, thankfully, gets himself into plenty more fights. “True Legend”‘s action setpieces find Yuen bringing new techniques like CGI and speed ramping into his tried-and-true formula of wire fu and beautiful, intricate choreography. Some of the new stuff works. Some, like the computer rendered landscapes during Su’s fights with Chou’s God of Wushu that look like they were rendered on a Sega Saturn, don’t. While I give Yuen major style points for experimentation, he’s still unquestionably at his best spinning new takes on old classics. The retro (but tremendously inventive) fight between Su and Yuen as they scale the walls of a well will be remembered and revered by genre fanatics for years to come.

Yuen’s work on the fight scenes in “The Matrix” inspired a decade of imitators. None of them could hold a candle to the real thing. Watching his work as both director and choroegrapher of “True Legend” I began to realize why; the knock-offs stole his flash but not his fundamentals. His camera placement and movement is always perfect and he doesn’t abuse slow motion the way so many of his lesser contemporaries do, only using it when necessary to heighten emotions, to let us dwell a few seconds longer on the face of a fighter as he summons his courage, or realizes he is going to lose as he falls to the floor. Space and time are always clear in his work; you never need to pause or rewind to understand who’s doing what to who. That’s because Yuen understands that martial arts sequences are more than bodies in motion, they are bodies telling stories in motion, and that’s what really separates his work from his copycats.

The resolution of Su and Yuen’s epic sibling rivalry, and particularly where that resolution comes in the narrative of the film, didn’t make much sense to me until I read about Beggar Su realized the character was something of a Chinese folkhero. Hence the film ends not with him at his lowest ebb, but after an otherwise unnecessary epilogue where he begins to truly harness the power of drunken boxing. But, of course, the great thing about martial arts movies, inferior though they may sometimes make us feel about ourselves, is that the plot is irrelevant, and any excuse to let Vincent Zhao fight three wrestlers simultaneously is a good one. Maybe I can’t quite describe the pleasures offered by “True Legend.” But I can definitely encourage you to experience them for yourself.

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Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

Hits from the '80s are on repeat all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC.

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GIFs via Giphy, Photos via The Everett Collection

It’s the final countdown to Christmas and thanks to IFC’s movie marathon all Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, you can revel in classic ’80s films AND find inspiration for your last-minute gifts. Here are our recommendations, if you need a head start:

Musical Instrument

Great analog entertainment substitute when you refuse to give your kid the Nintendo Switch they’ve been drooling over.

Breakfast In Bed

Any significant other or child would appreciate these Uncle Buck-approved flapjacks. Just make sure you’re not stuck on clean up duty.

Cocktail Supplies

You’ll need them to get through the holidays.

Dance Lessons

So you can learn to shake-shake-shake (unless you know ghosts willing to lend a hand).

Comfy Clothes

With all the holiday meals, there may be some…embigenning.



Get even more great inspiration all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC, and remember…

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A-O Rewind

Celebrating Portlandia One Sketch at a Time

The final season of Portlandia approaches.

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GIFs via Giphy

Most people measure time in minutes, hours, days, years…At IFC, we measure it in sketches. And nothing takes us way (waaaaaay) back like Portlandia sketches. Yes, there’s a Portlandia milepost from every season that changed the way we think, behave, and pickle things. In honor of Portlandia’s 8th and final season, Subaru presents a few of our favorites.

via GIPHY

Put A Bird On It

Portlandia enters the pop-culture lexicon and inspires us to put birds on literally everything.

Colin the Chicken

Who’s your chicken, really? Behold the emerging locavore trend captured perfectly to the nth degree.

Dream Of The ’90s

This treatise on Portland made it clear that “the dream” was alive and well.

No You Go

We Americans spend most of our lives in cars. Fortunately, there’s a Portlandia sketch for every automotive situation.

A-O River!

We learned all our outdoor survival skills from Kath and Dave.

One More Episode

The true birth of binge watching, pre-Netflix. And what you’ll do once Season 8 premieres.

Catch up on Portlandia’s best moments before the 8th season premieres January 18th on IFC.

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WTF Films

Artfully Off

Celebrity All-Star by Sisters Weekend is available now on IFC's Comedy Crib.

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Sisters Weekend isn’t like other comedy groups. It’s filmmaking collaboration between besties Angelo Balassone, Michael Fails and Kat Tadesco, self-described lace-front addicts with great legs who write, direct, design and produce video sketches and cinematic shorts that are so surreally hilarious that they defy categorization. One such short film, Celebrity All-Star, is the newest addition to IFC’s Comedy Crib. Here’s what they had to say about it in a very personal email interview…

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IFC: How would you describe Celebrity All-Star to a fancy network executive you just met in an elevator?

Celebrity All-Star is a short film about an overworked reality TV coordinator struggling to save her one night off after the cast of C-List celebrities she wrangles gets locked out of their hotel rooms.

IFC: How would you describe Celebrity All-Star to a drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?

Sisters Weekend: It’s this short we made for IFC where a talent coordinator named Karen babysits a bunch of weird c-list celebs who are stuck in a hotel bar. It’s everyone you hate from reality TV under one roof – and that roof leaks because it’s a 2-star hotel. There’s a magician, sexy cowboys, and a guy wearing a belt that sucks up his farts.

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IFC: What was the genesis of Celebrity All-Star?

Celebrity All-Star was born from our love of embarrassing celebrities. We love a good c-lister in need of a paycheck! We were really interested in the canned politeness people give off when forced to mingle with strangers. The backstory we created is that the cast of this reality show called “Celebrity All-Star” is in the middle of a mandatory round of “get to know each other” drinks in the hotel bar when the room keys stop working. Shows like Celebrity Ghost Hunters and of course The Surreal Life were of inspo, but we thought it
was funny to keep it really vague what kind of show they’re on, and just focus on everyone’s diva antics after the cameras stop rolling.

IFC: Every celebrity in Celebrity All-Star seems familiar. What real-life pop personalities did you look to for inspiration?

Sisters Weekend: Anyone who is trying to plug their branded merch that no one asked for. We love low-rent celebrity. We did, however, directly reference Kylie Jenner’s turd-raison lip color for our fictional teen celebutante Gibby Kyle (played by Mary Houlihan).

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IFC: Celebrity seems disgusting yet desirable. What’s your POV? Do you crave it, hate it, or both?

Sisters Weekend: A lot of people chase fame. If you’re practical, you’ll likely switch to chasing success and if you’re smart, you’ll hopefully switch to chasing happiness. But also, “We need money. We need hits. Hits bring money, money bring power, power bring fame, fame change the game,” Young Thug.

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IFC: Who are your comedy idols?

Sisters Weekend: Mike grew up renting “Monty Python” tapes from the library and staying up late to watch 2000’s SNL, Kat was super into Andy Kaufman and “Kids In The Hall” in high school, and Angelo was heavily influenced by “Strangers With Candy” and Anna Faris in the Scary Movie franchise, so, our comedy heroes mesh from all over. But, also we idolize a lot of the people we work with in NY-  Lorelei Ramirez, Erin Markey, Mary Houlihan, who are all in the film, Amy Zimmer, Ana Fabrega, Patti Harrison, Sam Taggart. Geniuses! All of Em!

IFC: What’s your favorite moment from the film?

Sisters Weekend: I mean…seeing Mary Houlihan scream at an insane Pomeranian on an iPad is pretty great.

See Sisters Weekend right now on IFC’s Comedy Crib

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