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Celebrate Summer With Our Favorite “Summer Movies”

Celebrate Summer With Our Favorite “Summer Movies” (photo)

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Memorial Day weekend marks the unofficial start of summer and the unofficial start of summer movie season. And when we say “summer movies” we typically mean the sort of stuff released during the summer: big, noisy, expensive blockbusters. But earlier today on his blog, Roger Ebert posted a great old episode of “Siskel and Ebert,” where the guys, dressed in their wackiest Hawaiian shirts, celebrated what they called “the movies of summer.” In other words, movies set in summer, or evocative of our own personal memories of summer.

True to form, many of their choices are deeply personal and highly eclectic: for example, instead of picking one of their classic beach movies, Siskel goes for Frankie and Annette’s reunion movie “Back to the Beach.” With my mind already on the warm weather, I thought I would chime in with a few more favorite “movies of summer.” And following their lead, these picks are completely subjective. When I think of “summer movies,” I think of these admittedly off-beat choices.


1. “Die Hard With a Vengeance” (1995)
Directed by John McTiernan

It’s all about those opening credits and that first scene, which rocked me back in my seat when I saw this film for the first time sixteen years summers ago. The Lovin Spoonful’s “Summer in the City” plays over steamy shots of Manhattan, culminating with the sudden explosion of bomb in a department store. “Die Hard With a Vengeance” is probably the third best “Die Hard” film, and I couldn’t possibly defend it as an objectively “good” movie. But my memories of going to see it and loving it as a kid back in May of 1995 are so strong. It’s the very first movie that came to mind when I began thinking about this piece. And it’s a great summer movie in both senses of the term —
all the frantic chases, fight scenes, and high-energy stunts leave you just as frazzled and overheated as John McClane.


2. “Body Heat” (1981)
Directed by Lawrence Kasdan

Maybe because of my overactive sudoriferous glands, summer makes me think of sweat. And in the context of movies, sweat makes me think of “Body Heat,” one of the few movies where the characters wear sweat stains loudly and proudly, like badges of honor. Clearly, Lawrence Kasdan didn’t work out any kind of product placement deal with an anti-persperant company for this movie; William Hurt spends half the movie with his shirt slick with perspiration and Florida humidity. He spends the other half naked Kathleen Turner, while the two plot to kill Turner’s wealthy husband in the middle of a brutal summer heatwave. “Body Heat” captures the way high temperatures can make any of us go a little crazy, with lust or with hatred. And it makes sweat, something I typically assign negative connotations, genuinely sexy.


3. “Before Sunset” (2004)
Directed by Richard Linklater

I’m not honestly sure when during the year “Before Sunset” takes place. It’s been a while since I’ve seen it, and looking at the trailer as Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy stroll through the streets of Paris, we see fallen leaves at their feet, suggesting it’s probably September or October. But regardless of when “Before Sunset” is actually set, it feels like it’s set on one of those perfect summer days, when the air is warm but crisp and there’s a light breeze in the air. Thinking about that movie always evokes summer for me: I saw it for the first time on a broiling summer day with the woman who’d eventually become my wife and the imagery the movie calls to mind — those beautiful strolls through Paris, that amazing late afternoon light — gives me flashes of sense memory from my own life, back to meeting strange and exciting new people in my own travels, playing the guitar at friends’ apartments, nighttime walks in the city, and falling in love over a good conversation.


4. “Wet Hot American Summer” (2001)
Directed by David Wain

I never went to sleepaway camp, and I was sheltered from all the slasher movies and raunchy comedies set around sleepaways until I was older. So the phrase “sleep away camp” harkens to my mind the images from a film that makes fun of all those other movies, 2001’s “Wet Hot American Summer.” The movie was actually filmed during a real sleepaway camp’s off-season, when it was plenty wet (you can see rain falling outside cabin windows on several occasions) but not especially hot. Still, even if David Wain and his crew don’t really capture the literal atmosphere of New England summer, they do manage to capture the emotional atmosphere of those bygone days, capturing through their absurd humor and deadpan non-sequitors some of the sparkle of young love, or at least the dumb first crushes that feel like the end of the world when they don’t pan out. Even though “Wet Hot” features some really dark jokes, it’s tone is still sweetly innocent. Though they make fun of camp movies, Wain and the rest also seem to wish they could go back and relive their youths (even though the cast is all far too old for their roles, they all play them anyway, probably to get a little taste of fulfilling that wish). Also: for a silly movie, the opening credits, set around a campfire to Jefferson Starship’s “Jane,” sure are legitimately cool.


5. “The Sandlot” (1993)
Directed by David Mickey Evans

One of the interesting observations Siskel and Ebert make on their “Movies of Summer” show is that summer movies almost always seem to be set in the past, and tap into our feelings of nostalgia for the innocence of our childhoods. Summers as an adult never mean as much as summers as a kid. As an adult, summer basically means one week vacation and more uncomfortable commute to work. But for a kid, summer represents a brief taste of genuine freedom. All of that’s true certainly about “The Sandlot,” a movie so fond of the past that it’s structured as a warm remembrance in the mind of one of the main characters, who flashes back to the summer of 1962 — “the best summer of my life,” he says — the year when he moved to a neighborhood near Los Angeles and fell in with a group of kids who play a daily game of baseball on a local sandlot field. As a kid, this charming story entertained me to no end. Of course, now I realize it is nostalgic in the comical extreme: the entire flashback occurs in the midst of the most critical game in the Los Angeles Dodgers’ season. The narrator is the radio announcer for the Dodgers and his best friend plays for the team. Instead of basking in the fact that they’ve both wound their way through life to get to this incredible spot, he spends the entire movie looking back at their childhoods. And as a kid, I thought this was just about the coolest movie ever.


Well, how about it? Those are my five; what are your favorite “movies of summer?”

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Give Back

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

Hits from the '80s are on repeat all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC.

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GIFs via Giphy, Photos via The Everett Collection

It’s the final countdown to Christmas and thanks to IFC’s movie marathon all Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, you can revel in classic ’80s films AND find inspiration for your last-minute gifts. Here are our recommendations, if you need a head start:

Musical Instrument

Great analog entertainment substitute when you refuse to give your kid the Nintendo Switch they’ve been drooling over.

Breakfast In Bed

Any significant other or child would appreciate these Uncle Buck-approved flapjacks. Just make sure you’re not stuck on clean up duty.

Cocktail Supplies

You’ll need them to get through the holidays.

Dance Lessons

So you can learn to shake-shake-shake (unless you know ghosts willing to lend a hand).

Comfy Clothes

With all the holiday meals, there may be some…embigenning.



Get even more great inspiration all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC, and remember…

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A-O Rewind

Celebrating Portlandia One Sketch at a Time

The final season of Portlandia approaches.

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GIFs via Giphy

Most people measure time in minutes, hours, days, years…At IFC, we measure it in sketches. And nothing takes us way (waaaaaay) back like Portlandia sketches. Yes, there’s a Portlandia milepost from every season that changed the way we think, behave, and pickle things. In honor of Portlandia’s 8th and final season, Subaru presents a few of our favorites.

via GIPHY

Put A Bird On It

Portlandia enters the pop-culture lexicon and inspires us to put birds on literally everything.

Colin the Chicken

Who’s your chicken, really? Behold the emerging locavore trend captured perfectly to the nth degree.

Dream Of The ’90s

This treatise on Portland made it clear that “the dream” was alive and well.

No You Go

We Americans spend most of our lives in cars. Fortunately, there’s a Portlandia sketch for every automotive situation.

A-O River!

We learned all our outdoor survival skills from Kath and Dave.

One More Episode

The true birth of binge watching, pre-Netflix. And what you’ll do once Season 8 premieres.

Catch up on Portlandia’s best moments before the 8th season premieres January 18th on IFC.

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WTF Films

Artfully Off

Celebrity All-Star by Sisters Weekend is available now on IFC's Comedy Crib.

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Sisters Weekend isn’t like other comedy groups. It’s filmmaking collaboration between besties Angelo Balassone, Michael Fails and Kat Tadesco, self-described lace-front addicts with great legs who write, direct, design and produce video sketches and cinematic shorts that are so surreally hilarious that they defy categorization. One such short film, Celebrity All-Star, is the newest addition to IFC’s Comedy Crib. Here’s what they had to say about it in a very personal email interview…

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IFC: How would you describe Celebrity All-Star to a fancy network executive you just met in an elevator?

Celebrity All-Star is a short film about an overworked reality TV coordinator struggling to save her one night off after the cast of C-List celebrities she wrangles gets locked out of their hotel rooms.

IFC: How would you describe Celebrity All-Star to a drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?

Sisters Weekend: It’s this short we made for IFC where a talent coordinator named Karen babysits a bunch of weird c-list celebs who are stuck in a hotel bar. It’s everyone you hate from reality TV under one roof – and that roof leaks because it’s a 2-star hotel. There’s a magician, sexy cowboys, and a guy wearing a belt that sucks up his farts.

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IFC: What was the genesis of Celebrity All-Star?

Celebrity All-Star was born from our love of embarrassing celebrities. We love a good c-lister in need of a paycheck! We were really interested in the canned politeness people give off when forced to mingle with strangers. The backstory we created is that the cast of this reality show called “Celebrity All-Star” is in the middle of a mandatory round of “get to know each other” drinks in the hotel bar when the room keys stop working. Shows like Celebrity Ghost Hunters and of course The Surreal Life were of inspo, but we thought it
was funny to keep it really vague what kind of show they’re on, and just focus on everyone’s diva antics after the cameras stop rolling.

IFC: Every celebrity in Celebrity All-Star seems familiar. What real-life pop personalities did you look to for inspiration?

Sisters Weekend: Anyone who is trying to plug their branded merch that no one asked for. We love low-rent celebrity. We did, however, directly reference Kylie Jenner’s turd-raison lip color for our fictional teen celebutante Gibby Kyle (played by Mary Houlihan).

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IFC: Celebrity seems disgusting yet desirable. What’s your POV? Do you crave it, hate it, or both?

Sisters Weekend: A lot of people chase fame. If you’re practical, you’ll likely switch to chasing success and if you’re smart, you’ll hopefully switch to chasing happiness. But also, “We need money. We need hits. Hits bring money, money bring power, power bring fame, fame change the game,” Young Thug.

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IFC: Who are your comedy idols?

Sisters Weekend: Mike grew up renting “Monty Python” tapes from the library and staying up late to watch 2000’s SNL, Kat was super into Andy Kaufman and “Kids In The Hall” in high school, and Angelo was heavily influenced by “Strangers With Candy” and Anna Faris in the Scary Movie franchise, so, our comedy heroes mesh from all over. But, also we idolize a lot of the people we work with in NY-  Lorelei Ramirez, Erin Markey, Mary Houlihan, who are all in the film, Amy Zimmer, Ana Fabrega, Patti Harrison, Sam Taggart. Geniuses! All of Em!

IFC: What’s your favorite moment from the film?

Sisters Weekend: I mean…seeing Mary Houlihan scream at an insane Pomeranian on an iPad is pretty great.

See Sisters Weekend right now on IFC’s Comedy Crib

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