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Miguel Arteta’s Wild Ride to “Cedar Rapids”

Miguel Arteta’s Wild Ride to “Cedar Rapids” (photo)

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Making a dick joke is rarely poignantly commemorated in a film, let alone the foundation for one for its most tender moments. Yet in “Cedar Rapids” when the sheltered insurance agent Tim Lippe (Ed Helms) fumbles upon a phallic observation during a hot dog eating contest and awaits approval like a puppy from his newfound colleagues and potential friends (John C. Reilly, “The Wire”‘s Isiah Whitlock Jr. and Anne Heche, the woman with the wiener in her mouth at the time), it’s a crucial part in what director Miguel Arteta says drew him to his latest film, “that heartwarming feeling that you get when those four people fall in love with each other.”

Love has been a complicated thing in Arteta’s films to date, sending Michael Cera off to create a confidence-boosting alter ego of himself in the adaptation of C.D. Payne’s “Youth in Revolt,” a neglected Jennifer Aniston into the arms of a Holden Caulfield-obsessed loner in “The Good Girl” and Mike White on a trip out to California to create a play to win over his childhood friend who’s since moved on in “Chuck & Buck.” In each case, the director has found the humanity and all of its attendant eccentricity and warmth that burst through when dealing with matters of the heart, which is why “Cedar Rapids” feels like a sly, fresh variation on the fish-out-of-water story since that same romantic sensation that overwhelms Tim Lippe is actually one of camaraderie. No wonder then that Arteta considers what he does to be “flirting with the audience,” as he mentions below, along with how his own fish-out-of-water status helped him adapt first-time feature screenwriter Phil Johnston’s Black List-approved script set in the Midwest, why he’s not drawn to “overtly hip” comedies and the pride of “Chuck & Buck” 10 years later. [Mild “Cedar Rapids” spoilers ahead.]

You’ve said a goal of yours is to make comedies without cynicism. Has that vision been easier or harder to sell to people over the years?

It depends on how you coded it. “Cedar Rapids,” it’s a very wholesome and sweet comedy, but it also has a lot of foul language in it. But unlike a movie that just shocks you for shock’s value, the foul language just comes with the territory. John C. Reilly’s character has to be that way. But I do think it’s harder. I think there’s a lot of hip comedies nowadays that seem to work from a shock value point of view and don’t seem as grounded as they claim to be, in my opinion. So I think this is a bit of a throwback to the Jimmy Stewart movies and the Jack Lemmon movies, sort of everyday guys who get out of where they come from and do something extraordinary.

Ed Helms reminds me of Jack Lemmon a lot. He has this great ability to look like an everyday man, like really disappear. You could believe him as an insurance salesman at an All-State office, but at the same time, he has that ability to be sweet, but have a comic edge, which is truly hard. Truly hard. It’s a lot easier to be sarcastic or mean with comedy, but to come from a sweet place, it’s rare when that really happens.

02092011_CedarRapids3.jpgDo you take into account what they’ve done before and consciously try to employ them for a different purpose?

Well, definitely. All storytelling is a way of flirting with an audience and when you’re making movies, the baggage that comes with a star is part of how you’re flirting with an audience. You think you’ve seen Anne Heche, but you haven’t seen her as a redhead who can make such a compassionate case for why she cheats once a year. And I think what stars bring is something that as a filmmaker you have to have in mind because it’s all flirting. You’re flirting with a bunch of strangers in the dark.

Having Alexander Payne as a producer will obviously draw some comparisons between your styles. What was it like having him as a creative partner?

It was great. Alexander and his partner Jim Taylor and their producing partner Jim Burke, all from the Midwest, helped an awful lot. Alexander kept an eye on making sure that we didn’t cross that line of making fun of characters ever. Like we had our two main characters meet at an Olive Garden and he was like, “no, no, no. Make it a sushi restaurant. Don’t stereotype the Midwest, please.” And Jim Taylor helped write a lot of Sigourney [Weaver]’s dialogue. He got really involved with Phil Johnston, how to tweak the story. They were very hands on and the three of them fought the studio for my casting choices and then they were very involved with the cuts. It was a really wonderful team and Ed and Phil had a really strong connection and they also had a wonderful voice, so I felt really well-supported on this film.

02082011_CedarRapids3.jpgSince all those guys come from the Midwest, did you feel that you had something valuable to offer coming from a different perspective?

A tropical one. [laughs] I did not know why they picked a Puerto Rican to make their love letter to Midwestern insurance, but God bless them because I had such a good time doing it. I relate to the story “Cedar Rapids,” coming from a different culture, coming to the big country of America, being in culture shock, not knowing who to trust, who the good guys and the bad guys are. There’s a correlation there to what it’s like for Tim Lippe to go to Cedar Rapids to this convention and not knowing who the people who share his values are. The whole thing to me is like “The Wizard of Oz” of insurance. Ed Helms is Dorothy going to the big Emerald City –he thinks he has a goal, but along the way, he meets the three motley crew characters who help him and in turn, he helps them. In some ways, the whole movie is a love letter to friendship and what a delight and a surprise it is that any moment, you might make a lifelong friend and I wanted to capture what it’s like in those first few days when you connect with somebody who’s going to be your friend for life, they’re just magical. They’re just so much fun and memorable. So I think the script and the film captures that and I’m most proud of that.

Is it just coincidence or is there something attractive to you about setting your films in small-town America, as your last three films have been?

I’m not interested in making movies that feel overtly hip and I’m pretty put off by that. So I think it just helps right off the bat if you set your film in a smaller town.


Final Countdown

The Best Of The Last

Portlandia Goes Out With A Bang

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The end is near. In mere days Portlandia wraps up its final season, and oh what a season it’s been. Lucky for you, you can watch the entire season right now right here and on the IFC app, including this free episode courtesy of Subaru.

But now, let’s take a moment to look back at some of the new classics Fred and Carrie have so thoughtfully bestowed upon us. (We’ll be looking back through tear-blurred eyes, but you do you.)

Couples Dinner

It’s not that being single sucks, it’s that you suck if you’re single.

Cancel it!

A sketch for anyone who has cancelled more appointments than they’ve kept. Which is everyone.

Forgotten America

This one’s a “Serial” killer…everything both right and wrong about true crime podcasts.

Wedding Planners

The only bad wedding is a boring wedding.

Disaster Hut

It’s only the end of the world if your doomsday kit doesn’t include rosé.

Catch up on Portlandia’s final episodes on demand and at


Rev Up

Your Portlandia Personality Test

The New Portlandia Webseries Is Going Your Way

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Carrie and Fred understand that although we have so much in common, we’re each so beautifully unique and different. To help us navigate those differences, Portlandia has found an easy and honest way to embrace our special selves in the form of a progressive new traffic system: a specific lane for every kind of driver. It’s all in honor of the show’s 8th and final season, and it’s all presented by Subaru.

Ready to find out who you really are? Match your personality to a lane and hop on the expressway to self-understanding.

Lane 10: Trucks Piled With Junk

Your junk is falling out of your trunk. Shake a tail light, people — this lane is for you.

Lane 33: Twins

You’re like a Gemini, but waaaay more pedestrian. Maybe you and a friend just wear the same outfits a lot. Who cares, it’s just twinning enough to make you feel special.

Lane 27: Broken Windows

Bad luck follows you around and everyone knows it. Your proverbial seat is always damp from proverbial rain. Is this the universe telling you to swallow your pride? Yes.

Lane 69: Filthy Cars

You’re all about convenience. Getting your car washed while you drive is a no-brainer.

Lane 43: Newly Divorced Singles

It’s been a while since you’ve driven alone, and you don’t know the rules of the road anymore. What’s too fast? What’s too slow? Are you sending the right signals? Don’t worry, the breakdown lane is nearby if you need it.

Still can’t find a lane to match your personality? Check out all the videos here. And see the final season of Portlandia this spring on IFC.


Give Back

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

Hits from the '80s are on repeat all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC.

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GIFs via Giphy, Photos via The Everett Collection

It’s the final countdown to Christmas and thanks to IFC’s movie marathon all Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, you can revel in classic ’80s films AND find inspiration for your last-minute gifts. Here are our recommendations, if you need a head start:

Musical Instrument

Great analog entertainment substitute when you refuse to give your kid the Nintendo Switch they’ve been drooling over.

Breakfast In Bed

Any significant other or child would appreciate these Uncle Buck-approved flapjacks. Just make sure you’re not stuck on clean up duty.

Cocktail Supplies

You’ll need them to get through the holidays.

Dance Lessons

So you can learn to shake-shake-shake (unless you know ghosts willing to lend a hand).

Comfy Clothes

With all the holiday meals, there may be some…embigenning.

Get even more great inspiration all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC, and remember…