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DID YOU READ

“The Social Network,” Reviewed

“The Social Network,” Reviewed (photo)

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Reviewed at the 2010 New York Film Festival.

When I was intern at Wired in 2002, I haphazardly pitched an editor on a recently launched website called Friendster, on which you could create a profile and then link it to those of your, you know, friends. “I’m sorry,” he said. “I just can’t imagine people ever actually wanting to use something like that.” In “The Social Network,” a similar sentiment’s expressed by the president of Harvard when confronted in 2004 by two students claiming that Mark Zuckerberg stole their site idea, one they say could be worth millions of dollars: “You might be letting your imagination run away with you.”

Now it’s 2010, and time has proved them both wrong — many people want to use a site like that, though it didn’t turn out to be Friendster, and it’s worth more than millions. It’s confounding, but also seems to sum up our time, that a billion dollar business worth more (at least on paper) than Starbucks can be built on such a seemingly frivolous concept with no initial monetization plan. And it’s incredibly appropriate that “The Social Network,” a film about that business, is a great, zeitgeisty thing built, improbably, on the squabbles of undergraduates turned entrepreneurs who talk big but are really just driven by spite, competition and a desire to be popular.

Just how much director David Fincher and screenwriter Aaron Sorkin are able to wring out of the story of the founding of Facebook is astounding. In this tale of asthmatic overachievers and entitled princelings trying to litigate each other to the death over a site based on showing off how many people you know is a microcosm of class, of ethics, and of the warped, weird thing that’s become of the American Dream. The film rings like a boxing bell, but it’s also uncommonly entertaining.

09212010_socialnetwork3.jpgOur story begins in the hallowed halls of Harvard University, where 19-year-old Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg), just dumped, drunk and curled over a laptop, is consoling himself by downloading pictures of girls and… coding them into a novelty website. With the help of a friend’s algorithm, he whips up Facemash.com, which pulls photos of coeds hacked from the sites of the school’s various individual residential houses and places two side by side. You click on the one you think is better looking, and it adds the results toward an overall ranking and offers you a new pair to choose between. It enrages much of the female undergrad population. It’s so popular it crashes Harvard’s network. And from that embittered evening of romantic rejection and online revenge, a multibillion dollar company was born.

But on the way, there are hearts to be broken. There’s that of Zuckerberg’s best friend and Facebook’s first CFO Eduardo Saverin (Andrew Garfield), who lends first that algorithm, then start-up funds to the nascent company, only to get pushed out as things picked up. There are those of Divya Narendra (Max Minghella) and identical twins Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss (played primarily by Armie Hammer, with digitally altered help from Josh Pence), moneyed upperclassmen who hire Zuckerberg to code a Harvard-only dating site that he deems mostly unworthy of his time and talent. Then there’s Sean Parker (Justin Timberlake), the wheeling, dealing Napster cofounder who doesn’t seem to have a heart to break, who latches onto the company as it rises, and who’s the only one who doesn’t end up suing Zuckerberg, though he might have also gotten the boot from him indirectly.

09212010_socialnetwork6.jpgAnd there’s Erica Albright (Rooney Mara), the one who got away, or rather did the relationship equivalent of a jump and roll out of a moving car. The role that girls play in the film is apparently one of the points of contention from the real life Zuckerberg and others who’ve protested how their story is portrayed. But sex and love, like popularity, like friends, come across as intangibles that Zuckerberg the character wants but has no idea has to obtain except as some inevitable consequence of success and power. If he can’t make people gravitate to him, at least he can get them all to use his website.

Played by Eisenberg as a perpetually hoodied, tightly wound prodigy most comfortable, despite his final club aspirations, in a room full of fellow nerds, Zuckerberg comes across as a dick, there is no question — he’s arrogant, impatient with and intolerant of anyone who doesn’t share his vision or can’t keep up with up. But there’s also something twistingly tragic in the sacrifices he feels he needs to make, the relationships he ends up shedding in favor of counting down to Facebook’s one millionth user. At Harvard, which “The Social Network” portrays as a claustrophobic, wintry environment of dark wood paneling and harsh fluorescent classroom lighting, there are always reminders that no matter how smart you are, it won’t open the same doors that being rich (like Saverin) or being from a prominent background (the Winklevoss twins) will. In the sunny, white-walled suburbs of Palo Alto, Zuckerberg is free to concoct a geek paradise in which he sets the rules, with Parker at his side like a devil on his shoulder.

09212010_socialnetwork4.jpg“The Social Network” is less showily Fincheresque than the director’s other work, though montages like the one juxtaposing Zuckerberg’s creation of Facemash.com with an exclusive Phoenix S.K. party to which a bus full of pretty girls is delivered are rich enough to eat with a spoon. Instead, the film wisely lets Sorkin’s clever, clever script, which bounces from the litigation hearings back to the past and around to different characters’ experiences, take the lead, along with the fine performances. Eisenberg makes Zuckerberg an aspiring android trying to shed his human heart, while Timberlake plays Parker as a glorious douchebag who when the going gets tough still needs to reach for his inhaler. Hammer is infinitely amusing in his dual role, exuding privilege and looking like something grown in a vat of J. Crew catalogs and Aryan race propaganda. And Garfield is here, as in “Never Let Me Go,” an affecting vulnerable sacrificial lamb.

For all that it’s “the Facebook movie,” “The Social Network” isn’t terribly concerned with the mechanics of the site itself — the addition of the field of relationship status and the creation of the Wall take place in the background of the personal maneuvers that are the focus. But that ends up emphasizing the odd, only semi-meaningful signifier that connecting with someone on Facebook has. Real life relationships are messy, complicated and sometimes hurtful. On Facebook, everyone’s your friend, and your life is as neat as the details you choose to reveal. And for Zuckerberg, allowing people that makes him the world’s youngest billionaire, which is entry into a very exclusive club indeed. But that doesn’t change the fact that he’s still just a guy sitting by himself with his laptop.

“The Social Network” opens on October 1st.

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Final Countdown

The Best Of The Last

Portlandia Goes Out With A Bang

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The end is near. In mere days Portlandia wraps up its final season, and oh what a season it’s been. Lucky for you, you can watch the entire season right now right here and on the IFC app, including this free episode courtesy of Subaru.

But now, let’s take a moment to look back at some of the new classics Fred and Carrie have so thoughtfully bestowed upon us. (We’ll be looking back through tear-blurred eyes, but you do you.)

Couples Dinner

It’s not that being single sucks, it’s that you suck if you’re single.

Cancel it!

A sketch for anyone who has cancelled more appointments than they’ve kept. Which is everyone.

Forgotten America

This one’s a “Serial” killer…everything both right and wrong about true crime podcasts.

Wedding Planners

The only bad wedding is a boring wedding.

Disaster Hut

It’s only the end of the world if your doomsday kit doesn’t include rosé.

Catch up on Portlandia’s final episodes on demand and at IFC.com

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Rev Up

Your Portlandia Personality Test

The New Portlandia Webseries Is Going Your Way

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Carrie and Fred understand that although we have so much in common, we’re each so beautifully unique and different. To help us navigate those differences, Portlandia has found an easy and honest way to embrace our special selves in the form of a progressive new traffic system: a specific lane for every kind of driver. It’s all in honor of the show’s 8th and final season, and it’s all presented by Subaru.

Ready to find out who you really are? Match your personality to a lane and hop on the expressway to self-understanding.

Lane 10: Trucks Piled With Junk

Your junk is falling out of your trunk. Shake a tail light, people — this lane is for you.

Lane 33: Twins

You’re like a Gemini, but waaaay more pedestrian. Maybe you and a friend just wear the same outfits a lot. Who cares, it’s just twinning enough to make you feel special.

Lane 27: Broken Windows

Bad luck follows you around and everyone knows it. Your proverbial seat is always damp from proverbial rain. Is this the universe telling you to swallow your pride? Yes.

Lane 69: Filthy Cars

You’re all about convenience. Getting your car washed while you drive is a no-brainer.

Lane 43: Newly Divorced Singles

It’s been a while since you’ve driven alone, and you don’t know the rules of the road anymore. What’s too fast? What’s too slow? Are you sending the right signals? Don’t worry, the breakdown lane is nearby if you need it.

Still can’t find a lane to match your personality? Check out all the videos here. And see the final season of Portlandia this spring on IFC.

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Give Back

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

Hits from the '80s are on repeat all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC.

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GIFs via Giphy, Photos via The Everett Collection

It’s the final countdown to Christmas and thanks to IFC’s movie marathon all Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, you can revel in classic ’80s films AND find inspiration for your last-minute gifts. Here are our recommendations, if you need a head start:

Musical Instrument

Great analog entertainment substitute when you refuse to give your kid the Nintendo Switch they’ve been drooling over.

Breakfast In Bed

Any significant other or child would appreciate these Uncle Buck-approved flapjacks. Just make sure you’re not stuck on clean up duty.

Cocktail Supplies

You’ll need them to get through the holidays.

Dance Lessons

So you can learn to shake-shake-shake (unless you know ghosts willing to lend a hand).

Comfy Clothes

With all the holiday meals, there may be some…embigenning.



Get even more great inspiration all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC, and remember…