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DID YOU READ

Michael Haneke Makes It Hurt So Good

Michael Haneke Makes It Hurt So Good (photo)

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I love black and white, and I use it every chance I can, but there were a number of technical difficulties. We had to start from scratch because no one has any experience working with it anymore. On top of that, we had to shoot using color film stock because black and white stock isn’t sensitive enough to film by candlelight and gaslight. We shot in color, and then transferred it to digital. There was an incredible amount of work involved, but I think the results made it worth it. In terms of visual models, we used as references the photographs of August Sander, who was the photographer in Germany during this period.

Were you pressured by investors or distributors to shoot in color?

Of course. [laughs] Our co-financiers in television demanded that we provide them with a color print. They didn’t want to show the film in black and white. It was only after we won the Palme d’Or that they finally reneged on their demand.

At the New York Film Festival press conference last fall, you said that the old cursive subtitle below the title translates to “A German children’s tale,” but you left it untranslated because it made the film too specific to German audiences.

We say that, in Germany, the audiences should see the film as about Germany. Whereas in America, people should see the film as about America, and in France, people should see it as about France. That’s why we didn’t translate that subtitle. It was meant as an ironic nudge at the German audience. Interestingly, even in Germany, over half the spectators won’t be able to understand it because it’s written in an old form of handwriting that my grandmother used, but even my parents can’t read.

What about the other part of the subtitle. Did you think the tongue-in-cheekiness of “a children’s tale” couldn’t be appreciated in other cultures?

The title is always the last thing you determine about a film. There were a number of titles that we were playing with through the years while I was working on this script. Until we made that decision, the film was called “A Children’s Tale.” It’s not so ironic. In both German and English, the title has an ambiguous meaning. It could mean both a tale about children, and a tale for children.

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I like that the film is narrated after the fact by a minor character who only appears in the margins of the story.

For dramaturgical reasons, the teacher and the nanny Eva are the only people who come from outside. An external viewpoint allowed me an objectifying perspective.

Since he’s an unreliable narrator, you’re able to play with the ideas of memory and mythology, by depicting exchanges between characters that he’d never have been privy to.

That’s the narrative irony. It’s also present in the classic novels, where the novelist claims to describe things that there’s no way he or she could know. That’s why the narrator begins the tale as he does. He says, “I’m not sure if the tale I’m about to describe to you actually took place in this way. My memory is vague and a lot of things I’ve heard only from hearsay.” The beginning is meant to stress for the audience that the reality they’re seeing onscreen shouldn’t be taken as reality, but as memories and artifact. The black and white stresses this artificial aspect, too.

This is your first film shot in Germany in a decade. How different is it working in other countries, especially outside of your native language?

It’s easier in Germany because I understand everything. [laughs] It’s not a question of how to explain myself. Even when I explain in a very childish way, the actors are forced to listen to me, so it’s not so terrible. I’m a control freak. I have to know what’s going on. If it’s in another country — even in France, I speak not-too-bad French — I’m a little bit out of control because they’re talking and I don’t understand everything. There’s more stress.

There are wonderful actors all around the world. By shooting in different languages, you have the opportunity to work with them as well. What’s important is, when you’re listening to your actors, to be able to tell whether the emotions are true or not. When it’s not my mother tongue, I can see if a reading is correct or not. The advantages outweigh the disadvantages. Working in different languages has allowed me to be able to shoot continuously without long pauses in between because I’ve been in different territories.

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There are a quite a few roles for children in all your films, and you always snag great performances out of them. Good child actors are hard to come by, as is. What’s your trick?

There’s no trick! You have to find the right casting, that’s all. If you have talented children, it’s better than an actor because they’re not playing. Actors are always playing another person. With a child, if it’s a lion, he is a lion.

Speaking of casting, I noticed “Everyone Else” co-star Birgit Minichmayr in a blink-and-you’ll-miss-her cameo. That other film is a part of the “Berlin School” filmmaking scene, and I’m curious what you think of it.

I know and admire the Berlin School of filmmakers, but Birgit really doesn’t belong to them. She’s an Austrian who works in Vienna, but I know her personally. That was as a favor to me that this huge theater star accepted this small role.

Your films are always so depressing and intense. Have you ever thought about directing something lighter, warmer, maybe a comedy?

Even my aunt would chide me and ask, “You’re such a nice young man. Why don’t you ever make comedies?” My answer to her was that you can’t ask a cobbler to make a hat.

“The White Ribbon” is now open in New York and Los Angeles before expanding into limited release on January 15th.

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Rev Up

Your Portlandia Personality Test

The New Portlandia Webseries Is Going Your Way

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Carrie and Fred understand that although we have so much in common, we’re each so beautifully unique and different. To help us navigate those differences, Portlandia has found an easy and honest way to embrace our special selves in the form of a progressive new traffic system: a specific lane for every kind of driver. It’s all in honor of the show’s 8th and final season, and it’s all presented by Subaru.

Ready to find out who you really are? Match your personality to a lane and hop on the expressway to self-understanding.

Lane 10: Trucks Piled With Junk

Your junk is falling out of your trunk. Shake a tail light, people — this lane is for you.

Lane 33: Twins

You’re like a Gemini, but waaaay more pedestrian. Maybe you and a friend just wear the same outfits a lot. Who cares, it’s just twinning enough to make you feel special.

Lane 27: Broken Windows

Bad luck follows you around and everyone knows it. Your proverbial seat is always damp from proverbial rain. Is this the universe telling you to swallow your pride? Yes.

Lane 69: Filthy Cars

You’re all about convenience. Getting your car washed while you drive is a no-brainer.

Lane 43: Newly Divorced Singles

It’s been a while since you’ve driven alone, and you don’t know the rules of the road anymore. What’s too fast? What’s too slow? Are you sending the right signals? Don’t worry, the breakdown lane is nearby if you need it.

Still can’t find a lane to match your personality? Check out all the videos here. And see the final season of Portlandia this spring on IFC.

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Give Back

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

Hits from the '80s are on repeat all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC.

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GIFs via Giphy, Photos via The Everett Collection

It’s the final countdown to Christmas and thanks to IFC’s movie marathon all Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, you can revel in classic ’80s films AND find inspiration for your last-minute gifts. Here are our recommendations, if you need a head start:

Musical Instrument

Great analog entertainment substitute when you refuse to give your kid the Nintendo Switch they’ve been drooling over.

Breakfast In Bed

Any significant other or child would appreciate these Uncle Buck-approved flapjacks. Just make sure you’re not stuck on clean up duty.

Cocktail Supplies

You’ll need them to get through the holidays.

Dance Lessons

So you can learn to shake-shake-shake (unless you know ghosts willing to lend a hand).

Comfy Clothes

With all the holiday meals, there may be some…embigenning.



Get even more great inspiration all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC, and remember…

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A-O Rewind

Celebrating Portlandia One Sketch at a Time

The final season of Portlandia approaches.

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GIFs via Giphy

Most people measure time in minutes, hours, days, years…At IFC, we measure it in sketches. And nothing takes us way (waaaaaay) back like Portlandia sketches. Yes, there’s a Portlandia milepost from every season that changed the way we think, behave, and pickle things. In honor of Portlandia’s 8th and final season, Subaru presents a few of our favorites.

via GIPHY

Put A Bird On It

Portlandia enters the pop-culture lexicon and inspires us to put birds on literally everything.

Colin the Chicken

Who’s your chicken, really? Behold the emerging locavore trend captured perfectly to the nth degree.

Dream Of The ’90s

This treatise on Portland made it clear that “the dream” was alive and well.

No You Go

We Americans spend most of our lives in cars. Fortunately, there’s a Portlandia sketch for every automotive situation.

A-O River!

We learned all our outdoor survival skills from Kath and Dave.

One More Episode

The true birth of binge watching, pre-Netflix. And what you’ll do once Season 8 premieres.

Catch up on Portlandia’s best moments before the 8th season premieres January 18th on IFC.

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