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DID YOU READ

The secret history.

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"I want to reveal how the military deprived us of our rational nature."
At the Christian Science Monitor, Takehiko Kambayashi surveys Kaoru Ikeya’s "Ari no Heitai (The Ants)," a documentary that follows former Japanese soldier Waichi Okumura on a trip to China. Okumura and other soldiers were ordered to continue fighting in China after the war’s end.

But Okumura’s commander, General Raishiro Sumita, came home even as his soldiers remained. A secret deal existed between Mr. Sumita and Nationalist Army Gen. Yan Xishan, according to testimony from survivors of both sides in the film.

General Yan asked Mr. Sumita to leave Japanese troops to help fight Mao. According to the film and studies of the subject, Yan promised to protect the Japanese military commander, who was a Class-A war criminal.

The film’s apparently been a success in very limited release in Japan, an interesting fact on this 61st anniversary of Japan’s defeat in World War II, as Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi angered many today by visiting the Yasukuni Shrine, which honors Japan’s 2.5 million war dead, including executed war criminals. China yesterday announced plans to make a film about 1937 Nanking massacre.

In the Independent, Tony Paterson writes that "Germany’s most celebrated living author, Günter Grass faces growing public outrage and demands that he should hand back his Nobel Prize for Literature after his admission he once served in Adolf Hitler’s notorious Waffen SS force." Grass made his shocking announcement over the weekend; his best known work, novel "The Tin Drum," was made into a Palme d’Or- and Oscar-winning film. Over at the New York Times, Anthony Tommasini reports on a tiff that’s sprung up between the American Friends of the Salzburg Festival and the festival itself over Tony Palmer’s documentary "The Salzburg Festival: A Short History" (PDF) "because of what festival directors consider Mr. Palmer’s overemphasized and sometimes inaccurate account of the festival’s intertwined relationship with the Nazis."

The film includes scenes of Hitler and German troops sweeping into Salzburg in 1938, as cheering throngs wave flags emblazoned with swastikas. There are rare film clips of German officers enjoying festival performances. Yet, as some critics have pointed out, Hitler personally attended the festival only once. His summer festival of choice was in Bayreuth, Germany, at Wagner’s opera house, which Hitler considered a sacred temple of German culture.

At US Military paper Stars and Stripes, Teri Weaver notes that Bong Joon-ho‘s Korean blockbuster "The Host" (which we’ve probably already reduced you to tears of boredom about) was inspired by an actual court case "that pitted the morgue director for the U.S. military in South Korea against the nation’s courts and environmental groups."

In early 2005, Albert McFarland was sentenced to two years’ probation and a suspended jail sentence after being tried in absentia on charges that in 2000, he ordered two morgue workers to dump about 192 16-ounce bottles containing a formaldehyde mixture.

The film’s director, Bong Joon-bo, has said he relied on the McFarland case as a plot device but he declined to call “The Host” a political satire, according to Yonhap. Bong declined an interview with Stars and Stripes through the movie’s production company, Chungeorham Film.

But Americans figure prominently as the movie’s plot develops and in the end, it’s the Americans who drive home the movie’s philosophical theme: All monsters and monstrous actions come from within…

Also last week, South Korea’s environmental minister cautioned that the film’s popularity may prompt more environmental protests against the U.S. military.

On a less national level, at the Sydney Morning Herald, Alexa Moses and Garry Maddox speak to young filmmaker Murali Thalluri, whose debut "2:37" was selection for Cannes’ Un Certain Regard program.

Murali Thalluri, 22, has repeatedly said his film, 2:37, which opens
in Sydney tomorrow, was inspired by his own suicide attempt and that of
a friend he refers to as Kelly.

But an anonymous email Thalluri says has been circulated to industry
associations and government film agencies alleges the Adelaide
writer-director invented parts of his life story, including Kelly’s
suicide and his own attempt to take his life when he was 19.

The contentious email also says Thalluri conned his way into the
movies after reading the novel Catch Me If You Can, which the director
Steven Spielberg turned into a movie starring Leonardo DiCaprio.

"That book, I think, is wonderful," Thalluri said. "The line that
has stuck with me is ‘You can get away with anything if you do it with
confidence’ … "Just because I read Catch Me If You Can and was inspired
by it doesn’t put me on the FBI’s Most Wanted…"

Thalluri does admit he faked his way into teaching an acting class
by inventing qualifications. The class helped him find 2:37’s young
cast.

+ Film confronts Japan on wartime past (CS Monitor)
+ Top writer admits to Nazi past (The Australian)
+ Grass ‘should give up Nobel Prize over SS past’ (Independent)
+ The Nazis and the Salzburg Festival: A Disputed Film History (NY Times)
+ USFK morgue incident inspired S. Korean horror movie (Stars and Stripes)
+ Filmmaker defends suicide story (Sydney Morning Herald)

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Final Countdown

The Best Of The Last

Portlandia Goes Out With A Bang

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The end is near. In mere days Portlandia wraps up its final season, and oh what a season it’s been. Lucky for you, you can watch the entire season right now right here and on the IFC app, including this free episode courtesy of Subaru.

But now, let’s take a moment to look back at some of the new classics Fred and Carrie have so thoughtfully bestowed upon us. (We’ll be looking back through tear-blurred eyes, but you do you.)

Couples Dinner

It’s not that being single sucks, it’s that you suck if you’re single.

Cancel it!

A sketch for anyone who has cancelled more appointments than they’ve kept. Which is everyone.

Forgotten America

This one’s a “Serial” killer…everything both right and wrong about true crime podcasts.

Wedding Planners

The only bad wedding is a boring wedding.

Disaster Hut

It’s only the end of the world if your doomsday kit doesn’t include rosé.

Catch up on Portlandia’s final episodes on demand and at IFC.com

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Rev Up

Your Portlandia Personality Test

The New Portlandia Webseries Is Going Your Way

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Carrie and Fred understand that although we have so much in common, we’re each so beautifully unique and different. To help us navigate those differences, Portlandia has found an easy and honest way to embrace our special selves in the form of a progressive new traffic system: a specific lane for every kind of driver. It’s all in honor of the show’s 8th and final season, and it’s all presented by Subaru.

Ready to find out who you really are? Match your personality to a lane and hop on the expressway to self-understanding.

Lane 10: Trucks Piled With Junk

Your junk is falling out of your trunk. Shake a tail light, people — this lane is for you.

Lane 33: Twins

You’re like a Gemini, but waaaay more pedestrian. Maybe you and a friend just wear the same outfits a lot. Who cares, it’s just twinning enough to make you feel special.

Lane 27: Broken Windows

Bad luck follows you around and everyone knows it. Your proverbial seat is always damp from proverbial rain. Is this the universe telling you to swallow your pride? Yes.

Lane 69: Filthy Cars

You’re all about convenience. Getting your car washed while you drive is a no-brainer.

Lane 43: Newly Divorced Singles

It’s been a while since you’ve driven alone, and you don’t know the rules of the road anymore. What’s too fast? What’s too slow? Are you sending the right signals? Don’t worry, the breakdown lane is nearby if you need it.

Still can’t find a lane to match your personality? Check out all the videos here. And see the final season of Portlandia this spring on IFC.

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Give Back

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

Hits from the '80s are on repeat all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC.

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GIFs via Giphy, Photos via The Everett Collection

It’s the final countdown to Christmas and thanks to IFC’s movie marathon all Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, you can revel in classic ’80s films AND find inspiration for your last-minute gifts. Here are our recommendations, if you need a head start:

Musical Instrument

Great analog entertainment substitute when you refuse to give your kid the Nintendo Switch they’ve been drooling over.

Breakfast In Bed

Any significant other or child would appreciate these Uncle Buck-approved flapjacks. Just make sure you’re not stuck on clean up duty.

Cocktail Supplies

You’ll need them to get through the holidays.

Dance Lessons

So you can learn to shake-shake-shake (unless you know ghosts willing to lend a hand).

Comfy Clothes

With all the holiday meals, there may be some…embigenning.



Get even more great inspiration all Christmas Eve and Day on IFC, and remember…