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DID YOU READ

Carrie Brownstein tells us all about the third season of Portlandia

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As you have probably heard, the new season of Portlandia kicks off tonight at 10/9c with back-to-back episodes. We talked to Portlandia star, writer and creator Carrie Brownstein about what to expect this season:

Hi Carrie, as you embark on season three, did you ever think Portlandia would make it this far?

We didn’t go into season one with any expectations for the show We made one episode, one season at a time. It’s a pleasant surprise that people are responding positively to our creative effort.

Does the show get easier to write?

It’s just as challenging if not more challenging and, honestly, we never want it to feel easy. I’m always skeptical of things that feel too facile.

This time we were interested in season long narrative arcs, like what we were seeing in our favorite shows like Homeland and Game of Thrones. We wanted more conceptual entities, more story based ideas, more about ‘Who are these people?’ and then ‘Which of these scenarios do they lend themselves to?’ We spend a lot of more time being deliberate about endings and really making sure that there is a story. Those are all basic tenets of good story writing, but when you’re doing a sketch you can get wrapped up in improvising, so this season we really worked on having story arcs and endings in place. We focused on building an infrastructure in which we could improvise because the dialog is mostly improvised. There were some growing pains, but we all feel like it paid off. There’s more opening for the audience to relate.

Who else is in your writers’ room?

Along with Fred and Jonathan, there’s Bill Oakley, who writes and also produces. Last season we worked with Karey Dornetto who was at Community, but now she is writing for The New Normal. So then Chelsea Peretti came in as a consulting writer. We would love to have her as a regular contributors.

What’s the Portlandia writers’ room like?

It’s pretty traditional. There’s a bulletin board with index cards and we put everything up on it. Sometimes an idea will become a line in a different episode or show up as a character trait. Sometimes will come up with full-fledged sketches and have to determine which character that sketch is for. The room ends up covered in index cards and you think the season is written, but then you realize there are no endings, nothing is fleshed out. There are just momentary rewards. Then we start organizing things by episode, get wraparounds, going off and writing individual scripts. It’s very collaborative.

As someone who hasn’t written for other television shows before, what was the learning curve like for you?

The first year I was nervous. I knew what the process would involve pitching.
Being in a band and writing a riff has a some of that. The first year we had Alison Silverman working with us, she was a writer for The Daily Show and The Colbert Report, and I kind of operated under her tutelage that year and she was wonderful and supportive and Fred and I had a great rapport. Jonathan had done some writing but neither he nor Fred had really written for their own shows before, so while there was a learning curve, we were all on a similar kind of starting point. We weren’t trying to emulate another show we had worked on, because none of us had really done that before. There was no other set of rules or infrastructure.

What’s the difference in the creative process between being in a band vs writing for Portlandia?

It’s easier to describe the ways that they are analogous. One person comes up with an idea and someone says, “What if instead of …” and it goes from there. It’s like you have a song and you come up with an album. There really are more similarities than differences. The way you add on ideas is kind of similar. The main difference with Portlandia is that we don’t finish something until it’s shot. There’s so much improvisation that the sketch isn’t finalized until it’s shot.

You don’t write dialogue?

We write some as placeholders, but 90% of the show is improvised. When Fred and I go into a scheme we climb this scaffolding, we know where to end up in the scene. The first season we didn’t have that and we would get lost in the scene and they would build a story out of what was essentially us throwing words at the wall. Now there’s improvisation, but we have a goal in every scene. We spend a lot more time writing and being very deliberate about endings and really making sure that there is a story. What we have learned from each season to season is that the characters have to have a relationship within their setting. We can’t just be a situation or a concept. We have to have a goal. There has to be stakes.

After season one’s now ubiquitous Put A Bird On It! and season two produced “We Can Pickle That!” did you feel any pressure to come up with a catch phrase for season three?

Absolutely not. We are a television show not a marketing company. We leave that to the audience to use their imagination. Everybody has a different relationship to the show and it’s such an individual experience. You can’t try to guess or determine what people will be drawn to beforehand. To do that is to limit yourself and take less risks. It’s not our job to push an idea or a phrase onto the audience. I don’t know if this season has a catchphrase, but it’s always surprising what people relate to. We’ve really worked on that scaffolding within the scenes and within the story, so that we know where to go as we improvise.

What character do you most enjoy playing?

Nance, who was in the first season at the cult farm and in the motorcycle sketch in the second season with Peter. This season they open up a bed and breakfast. They are very syrupy unctuous couple. Everything is very comfortable and cozy with them, but there is always a small vibration of tension and underlying acrimony and every once in a while it oscillates so quickly. I like vacillating between those two extremes. They are a fun couple to play. You see so many couples like that, who are so benign on the surface. Then Fred came up with this very strange stutter. We love writing for them. We spend a lot of time as Peter and Nance.

Which costume do you enjoy wearing the most?

Toni from the feminist bookstore. I don’t understand clothes that feel like a small apartment. There’s so roomy and ridiculous and strange. As unattractive as they are, they are a much bolder sartorial choices than I make on my own.

Do you have a favorite sketch from this upcoming season?

The birthday episode. It’s one single sketch, one theme, one event. I don’t love playing Lance, but I love Fred as Nina. I loved exploring the adult birthday and how gratuitous and strange that is. Riding in on a horse was weird. There were balloons. Just a stream of ridiculousness that I liked.

Back in season one when Kumail Nanjiani came on the show for the first time as a clerk, did you immediately know you wanted to make him a permanent resident of Portlandia?

He was just so awesome we kept inviting him back. He’s brilliant and he’s an amazing improviser and we were completely fine with him playing these characters who have the same objective, which is to flummox and confound whoever he is up against. We want him back all the time. He crops up a few more times this season.

Do you consider yourself a comedian?

No, no I don’t. I consider myself a writer.

Want the latest news from Portlandia? Like them on Facebook and follow them on Twitter@ifcPortlandia and use the hashtag #portlandia.

Portlandia returns to IFC tonight at 10/9c

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Hacked In

Funny or Die Is Taking Over

FOD TV comes to IFC every Saturday night.

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We’ve been fans of Funny or Die since we first met The Landlord. That enduring love makes it more than logical, then, that IFC is totally cool with FOD hijacking the airwaves every Saturday night. Yes, that’s happening.

The appropriately titled FOD TV looks like something pulled from public access television in the nineties. Like lo-fi broken-antenna reception and warped VHS tapes. Equal parts WTF and UHF.

Get ready for characters including The Shirtless Painter, Long-Haired Businessmen, and Pigeon Man. They’re aptly named, but for a better sense of what’s in store, here’s a taste of ASMR with Kelly Whispers:

Watch FOD TV every Saturday night during IFC’s regularly scheduled movies.

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Wicked Good

See More Evil

Stan Against Evil Season 1 is on Hulu.

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Okay, so you missed the entire first season of Stan Against Evil. There’s no shame in that, per se. But here’s the thing: Season 2 is just around the corner and you don’t want to lag behind. After all, Season 1 had some critical character development, not to mention countless plot twists, and a breathless finale cliffhanger that’s been begging for resolution since last fall. It also had this:

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The good news is that you can catch up right now on Hulu. Phew. But if you aren’t streaming yet, here’s a basic primer…

Willards Mill Is Evil

Stan spent his whole career as sheriff oblivious to the fact that his town has a nasty curse. Mostly because his recently-deceased wife was secretly killing demons and keeping Stan alive.

Demons Really Want To Kill Stan

The curse on Willards Mill stipulates that damned souls must hunt and kill each and every town sheriff, or “constable.” Oh, and these demons are shockingly creative.

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They Also Want To Kill Evie

Why? Because Evie’s a sheriff too, and the curse on Willard’s Mill doesn’t have a “one at a time” clause. Bummer, Evie.

Stan and Evie Must Work Together

Beating the curse will take two, baby, but that’s easier said than done because Stan doesn’t always seem to give a damn. Damn!

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Beware of Goats

It goes without saying for anyone who’s seen the show: If you know that ancient evil wants to kill you, be wary of anything that has cloven feet.

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Season 2 Is Lurking

Scary new things are slouching towards Willards Mill. An impending darkness descending on Stan, Evie and their cohort – eviler evil, more demony demons, and whatnot. And if Stan wants to survive, he’ll have to get even Stanlier.

Stan Against Evil Season 1 is now streaming right now on Hulu.

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SO EXCITED!!!

Reminders that the ’90s were a thing

"The Place We Live" is available for a Jessie Spano-level binge on Comedy Crib.

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Unless you stopped paying attention to the world at large in 1989, you are of course aware that the ’90s are having their pop cultural second coming. Nobody is more acutely aware of this than Dara Katz and Betsy Kenney, two comedians who met doing improv comedy and have just made their Comedy Crib debut with the hilarious ’90s TV throwback series, The Place We Live.

IFC: How would you describe “The Place We Live” to a fancy network executive you just met in an elevator?

Dara: It’s everything you loved–or loved to hate—from Melrose Place and 90210 but condensed to five minutes, funny (on purpose) and totally absurd.

IFC: How would you describe “The Place We Live” to a drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?

Betsy: “Hey Todd, why don’t you have a sip of water. Also, I think you’ll love The Place We Live because everyone has issues…just like you, Todd.”

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IFC: When you were living through the ’90s, did you think it was television’s golden age or the pop culture apocalypse?


Betsy: I wasn’t sure I knew what it was, I just knew I loved it!


Dara: Same. Was just happy that my parents let me watch. But looking back, the ’90s honored The Teen. And for that, it’s the golden age of pop culture. 

IFC: Which ’90s shows did you mine for the series, and why?

Betsy: Melrose and 90210 for the most part. If you watch an episode of either of those shows you’ll see they’re a comedic gold mine. In one single episode, they cover serious crimes, drug problems, sex and working in a law firm and/or gallery, all while being young, hot and skinny.


Dara: And almost any series we were watching in the ’90s, Full House, Saved By the Bell, My So Called Life has very similar themes, archetypes and really stupid-intense drama. We took from a lot of places. 

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IFC: How would you describe each of the show’s characters in terms of their ’90s TV stereotype?

Dara: Autumn (Sunita Mani) is the femme fatale. Robin (Dara Katz) is the book worm (because she wears glasses). Candace (Betsy Kenney) is Corey’s twin and gives great advice and has really great hair. Corey (Casey Jost) is the boy next door/popular guy. Candace and Corey’s parents decided to live in a car so the gang can live in their house. 
Lee (Jonathan Braylock) is the jock.

IFC: Why do you think the world is ready for this series?

Dara: Because everyone’s feeling major ’90s nostalgia right now, and this is that, on steroids while also being a totally new, silly thing.

Delight in the whole season of The Place We Live right now on IFC’s Comedy Crib. It’ll take you back in all the right ways.