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Doc Your Socks Off

Documentary Now! Returns September 14th for Its 51st Season

Bill and Fred are back September 14th at 10P on IFC.

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Nobody pays homage to the weird and wonderful world of documentary filmmaking quite like the team behind Documentary Now!. In the show’s first (and 50th) season, Fred Armisen, Bill Hader and Seth Meyers offered pitch-perfect satire that nodded to everything from Grey Gardens to The Thin Blue Line. And beginning September 14th at 10P on IFC, they’re back — along with acclaimed host Helen Mirren — for another round of non-fiction tributes

The second season kicks off with “The Bunker,” inspired by the 1993 political documentary The War Room featuring James Carville and George Stephanopoulos. In the episode, Hader and Armisen play two political campaign managers scheming to get their inexperienced candidate elected as Governor of Ohio through underhanded tactics that would make Karl Rove blush.

Take a look at a sneak peek of “The Bunker” below.

Other documentaries that inspired this season’s batch of episodes include the classic Talking Heads concert film Stop Making Sense, popular food doc Jiro Dreams of Sushi and, in a two-part episode, the colorful Hollywood history The Kid Stays in the Picture.

Here’s a look at what’s coming this season:

The premiere episode “The Bunker” is inspired by the heart-racing 1993 political documentary The War Room, with James Carville and George Stephanopoulos. It follows two scheming and cocky campaign managers (Hader and Armisen) working on the heated race for the Governor of Ohio. Lies will be told, death threats will be made, and questionable ’90s fashion choices will surface, all in the camcorder-documented fight to get their underdog candidate to the top.

Shot in Colombia, “Juan Likes Rice & Chicken” is a colorful food-centric homage to the 2011 documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi. Young chef Arturo (Armisen) and his brother learn the tricks of the trade from their stern, no-nonsense father Juan who runs a highly-acclaimed restaurant that only serves one dish made with painstaking precision — chicken and buttered rice. Who wouldn’t travel thousands of miles for the world’s best plate of rice?

“Parker Gail’s Location is Everything” is inspired by the 1987 documentary Swimming to Cambodia directed by Jonathan Demme. In the episode, Hader gives a tour-de-force performance as Parker Gail (lovingly inspired by playwright Spalding Gray), a monologist who shares a riveting tale with his audience –- a story on the tragic loss of his New York City apartment –- all while sitting behind a bare desk in an intimate black box theater.

Inspired by the groundbreaking 1984 Talking Heads concert documentary Stop Making Sense, “Final Transmission” features an eponymous hit band (Armisen, Hader and Maya Rudolph) performing a riveting, high-energy final concert to an eager audience of fans. The innovative episode includes a musically-diverse set list of songs written by Armisen himself. Outside of the concert, the episode will delve deep into the musicians’ interwoven backstories and reveal the inspirations behind their ’80s classics such as “Free David Ness” and “Indeng Indeng.”

A tribute to the 1968 Maysles documentary Salesman that followed a wearied quartet of door-to-door Bible salesmen, “Globesman” shares a similar story about four hard-working business men trying their best to sell globes to a community of people who find them too expensive and ultimately prefer atlases. Feeling pressure from their regional manager, and dealing with the constant rejection from customers, the salesmen do anything they can to reinvent the globe as a need-to-have household item.

“Mr. Runner Up: My Life as an Oscar Bridesmaid, Part 1 and Part 2” is inspired by The Kid Stays in the Picture, the 2002 documentary that traces the meteoric rise, fall and rise again of legendary Hollywood producer Robert Evans. The two-part episode will follow a similar aging producer in the cutthroat movie business (Hader) giving an account of his rocky Tinsletown career and his elusive quest for Hollywood’s top prize.

Stay tuned to IFC.com for more updates about the second season of Documentary Now!. You can also join the party on Facebook, TwitterInstagram and Snapchat using ifctvsnaps.

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Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

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He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

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GIFS via Giphy

On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

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Draught Pick

Sam Adams “Keeps It Brockmire”

All New Brockmire airs Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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From baseball to beer, Jim Brockmire calls ’em like he sees ’em.

via GIPHY

It’s no wonder at all, then, that Sam Adams would reach out to Brockmire to be their shockingly-honest (and inevitably short-term) new spokesperson. Unscripted and unrestrained, he’ll talk straight about Sam—and we’ll take his word. Check out this new testimonial for proof:

See more Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC, presented by Samuel Adams. Good f***** beer.

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