This browser is supported only in Windows 10 and above.

DID YOU READ

Stranger than Fiction

12 Bizarre True Stories that Became Must See Documentaries

Grizzly Man

Posted by on

By Bruce Cherry

Documentaries chronicle the entire gamut of human experience, from the stirringly inspirational to the heartbreaking, the tragic, and the hauntingly beautiful. And just like life, some of the best documentaries are just downright weird. To get you ready for the uniquely hilarious documentaries that the 50th season of Documentary Now! has to offer, here are 12 docs that put the “strange” in “stranger than fiction.” If you’d like to experience the oddness first hand, head over to the SundanceNow Doc Club and check out some great documentary filmmaking.

12. Crazy Love

It’s the same old story — guy meets girl, they fall in love, complications ensue, guy has lye thrown in girl’s face permanently blinding her, does 14 years for the crime, gets out, and then they get married and live happily ever after. And you thought you had some dysfunctional relationships! Burt Pugach and Linda Riss give new meaning to the phrase “You crazy kids deserve each other.” It’s the perfect film for a truly weird date night.


11. In the Realms of the Unreal

The longest work of fiction ever written in human history is a 15,000-plus page work by a reclusive janitor in Chicago without friends or family. Henry Darger typed his work on an old manual typewriter alone in his apartment over the course of 60 years. Filmmaker Jessica Yu’s documentary tells the story of Darger, a man so socially isolated that only a handful of photos of him exist. The documentary focuses on Darger’s work, which was found by his landlord after his death. It was titled The Story of the Vivian Girls, in What is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinnian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion…and the title is the least odd thing about Darger’s sprawling and bizarre opus. But this doc uses its haunting strangeness to make people think about the human urge to create.


10. Cat Dancers

If this doc were a work of fiction, the pitch would be “Deadly jungle cats being trained by people engaged in a threesome” or simply “Menagerie and Menage-a-trois!” Husband and wife entertainers Ron and Joy Holiday worked exotic jungle cats into their act, and then worked fellow cat-trainer Chuck Lizza into their relationship, and their bedroom. With those kinds of complicated dynamics at work, you know that somebody is going to end up getting hurt—and we’re not just talking heartbreak.


9. Crumb

You have to figure that the underground cartoonist who gave the world Fritz the Cat would have a few quirky kinks in him. And yes, we learn in this brilliant documentary that as a child, Robert Crumb felt a sexual attraction to Bugs Bunny. What you don’t expect is that he seems to be by far the most normal member of his family. Crumb’s two brothers, who appear extensively in the film, are even more tormented than he is. Artists in their own right, their respective issues kept them from achieving the sort of fame that their brother Robert did. Filmmaker Terry Zwigoff (Ghost World) spent the nine years it took to make this film in poverty and suffering back pain that left him suicidal. What he got for all that suffering is a finished product that is one of the greatest documentaries ever made.


8. Air Guitar Nation

Yes, there is a world championship of Air Guitar. And yes, somebody made a documentary about it. And yes, yes, yes, it ROCKS! Director Alexandra Lipsitz’s feature-length doc focuses on the rivalry between aspiring air guitar greats C-Diddy and Bjorn Turoque (say it out loud). They battle it out for the first-ever title of US Air Guitar Champion before heading to the world championships which are held every year in Oulu, Finland. This doc is more funny-strange than disturbing-strange, though that depends on just how disturbing you find the thought of grown people playing air guitar on stage is.


7. Grizzly Man

If there is a sub-genre of weird documentaries, then it’s documentaries about people being eaten by things they should really leave alone (see Cat Dancing). That genre was pioneered by Werner Herzog’s brilliant Grizzly Man. It’s about bear aficionado Timothy Treadwell who spent years filming grizzlies in Alaska—way, way too closely. Much of the footage is Treadwell’s own, including an audio recording of the bear attack that killed him and his girlfriend. The concept is so harrowing that the film just shows us a shot of someone watching Werner Herzog listening to the recording on headphones—and even that is spine-chilling!


6. I Think We’re Alone Now

This is the story of not one, but two individuals who have an obsession with ’80s teen-pop singer Tiffany. Jeff is a 50-year-old man diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome who has never been in a relationship. Kelly is a 38-year-old “intersex” person from Colorado who claims to have seen a vision of Tiffany while in a coma and now believes that they have a special relationship. Director Sean Donnelly takes us inside the lives of these two people on a journey that is at times amusing, sad, and oddly hopeful. In the end we see them as human beings. Oh, and Tiffany comes off pretty well too.


5. Married to the Eiffel Tower

Here we have a documentary about women with a sexual fetish that sounds more like an idea for a digital short on SNL— they form intimate attachments to large objects like the Eiffel Tower or the Golden Gate Bridge. I don’t know if you’ve seen the lines for getting onto the Golden Gate Bridge or going up the Eiffel Tower, but if you’re going to have a relationship with them, it’s sure not going to be exclusive. People with the condition are called Objectum Sexuals, or OS people. Kudos to the women in the documentary for going public with their condition…though it’s kind of hard to hide it when you’re fondling the Golden Gate Bridge in front of confused tourists.


4. Marwencol

After a brutal beating outside of a bar left him with severe brain damage and very little memory of his prior life, Mark Hogancamp began his recovery in a highly unusual way: He built a 1/6-scale World War II-era Belgian town in his backyard and named it Marwencol. Then he populated it with dolls that represented the people in his life—family, friends, and even the men who attacked him—and he created scenarios to help him try and regain his memory and basic motor skills. He took photos to document his stories, and when they were published, Mark found his self-made therapy being celebrated as art. Like In the Realms of the Unreal, this documentary from Jeff Malmberg explores the intersection of fantasy and reality in art.


3. Zoo

OK, there is a second sub-genre of strange documentaries— the ones that deal with things that people have sex with that they probably shouldn’t (see Married to the Eiffel Tower). Zoo in this case refers to “zoophile,” or someone who likes to have sex with animals. Wait…it gets worse. This particular doc deals with a man who died of peritonitis after his colon was perforated during an, uh, “encounter” with a horse. Try taking that in—the concept, I mean. OK, even though I find it impossible to describe this doc with anything remotely resembling taste, the film itself was praised by reviewers. So it seems that filmmaker Robin Devore made some wise decisions, even if that’s more than you can say for the guy the documentary is about.


2. Vernon, Florida

An early (1981) film from master documentarian Errol Morris, Vernon, Florida proves that the search for strangeness doesn’t have to take you to the wilds of Alaska or the Realms of the Unreal. You can find weirdness in any old town, though it sure doesn’t hurt if the town is in Florida. Morris originally went to Vernon because the town had an extremely high rate of people cutting off their own limbs for insurance payouts. Vernon, Florida doesn’t even get to that, as Morris allows the oddball characters of the town to ramble on freely, resulting in an affectionate ode to small town eccentricity.


1. Grey Gardens

The mother of all strange documentaries, or more accurately, the eccentric mother and kooky daughter of all strange documentaries. Albert and David Maysles landmark 1975 doc tells the story of an elderly mother and grown daughter (relatives of Jackie Kennedy) who are now down and out, living in the decaying family mansion in the Hamptons along with various vermin and raccoons. Big Edie and Little Edie are the iconic strange documentary subjects— nutty, but full of personality and often animated and joyful. That goes a long way toward making a viewer feel better about peeking into an oddball private world like theirs. If there is a Goddess of Strange Documentaries, she looks just like Little Edie in the scene where she does her flag dance to the brass band music.

Missed the premiere of Documentary Now! and suffering from serious FOMO? Catch the first episode at any of the times below or check it out on demand.

8/22/2015 @ 12:30PM

8/23/2015 @ 11:00PM

8/23/2015 @ 05:30AM

8/30/2015 @ 11:30PM

8/26/15 @ 01:00PM

8/27/15 @ 04:30PM

8/28/15 @ 05:00AM

8/29/15 @ 11:45AM

See how Documentary Now‘s “Sandy Passages” compares to Grey Gardens below.

[brightcove video=”4432047410001″ og=”false”/]
IFC_ComedyCrib_ThePlaceWeLive_SeriesImage_web

SO EXCITED!!!

Reminders that the ’90s were a thing

"The Place We Live" is available for a Jessie Spano-level binge on Comedy Crib.

Posted by on
GIFs via Giphy

Unless you stopped paying attention to the world at large in 1989, you are of course aware that the ’90s are having their pop cultural second coming. Nobody is more acutely aware of this than Dara Katz and Betsy Kenney, two comedians who met doing improv comedy and have just made their Comedy Crib debut with the hilarious ’90s TV throwback series, The Place We Live.

IFC: How would you describe “The Place We Live” to a fancy network executive you just met in an elevator?

Dara: It’s everything you loved–or loved to hate—from Melrose Place and 90210 but condensed to five minutes, funny (on purpose) and totally absurd.

IFC: How would you describe “The Place We Live” to a drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?

Betsy: “Hey Todd, why don’t you have a sip of water. Also, I think you’ll love The Place We Live because everyone has issues…just like you, Todd.”

via GIPHY

IFC: When you were living through the ’90s, did you think it was television’s golden age or the pop culture apocalypse?


Betsy: I wasn’t sure I knew what it was, I just knew I loved it!


Dara: Same. Was just happy that my parents let me watch. But looking back, the ’90s honored The Teen. And for that, it’s the golden age of pop culture. 

IFC: Which ’90s shows did you mine for the series, and why?

Betsy: Melrose and 90210 for the most part. If you watch an episode of either of those shows you’ll see they’re a comedic gold mine. In one single episode, they cover serious crimes, drug problems, sex and working in a law firm and/or gallery, all while being young, hot and skinny.


Dara: And almost any series we were watching in the ’90s, Full House, Saved By the Bell, My So Called Life has very similar themes, archetypes and really stupid-intense drama. We took from a lot of places. 

via GIPHY

IFC: How would you describe each of the show’s characters in terms of their ’90s TV stereotype?

Dara: Autumn (Sunita Mani) is the femme fatale. Robin (Dara Katz) is the book worm (because she wears glasses). Candace (Betsy Kenney) is Corey’s twin and gives great advice and has really great hair. Corey (Casey Jost) is the boy next door/popular guy. Candace and Corey’s parents decided to live in a car so the gang can live in their house. 
Lee (Jonathan Braylock) is the jock.

IFC: Why do you think the world is ready for this series?

Dara: Because everyone’s feeling major ’90s nostalgia right now, and this is that, on steroids while also being a totally new, silly thing.

Delight in the whole season of The Place We Live right now on IFC’s Comedy Crib. It’ll take you back in all the right ways.

Neurotica_105_MPX-1920×1080

New Nasty

Whips, Chains and Hand Sanitizer

Turn On The Full Season Of Neurotica At IFC's Comedy Crib

Posted by on

Jenny Jaffe has a lot going on: She’s writing for Disney’s upcoming Big Hero 6: The Series, developing comedy projects with pals at Devastator Press, and she’s straddling the line between S&M and OCD as the creator and star of the sexyish new series Neurotica, which has just made its debut on IFC’s Comedy Crib. Jenny gave us some extremely intimate insight into what makes Neurotica (safely) sizzle…

IFC_CC_Neurotica_Series_Image4

IFC: How would you describe Neurotica to a fancy network executive you met in an elevator?

Jenny: Neurotica is about a plucky Dominatrix with OCD trying to save her small-town dungeon.

IFC: How would you describe Neurotica to a drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?

Jenny: Neurotica is about a plucky Dominatrix with OCD trying to save her small-town dungeon. You’re great. We should get coffee sometime. I’m not just saying that. I know other people just say that sometimes but I really feel like we’re going to be friends, you know? Here, what’s your number, I’ll call you so you can have my number!

IFC: What’s your comedy origin story?

Jenny: Since I was a kid I’ve dealt with severe OCD and anxiety. Comedy has always been one of the ways I’ve dealt with that. I honestly just want to help make people feel happy for a few minutes at a time.

IFC: What was the genesis of Neurotica?

Jenny: I’m pretty sure it was a title-first situation. I was coming up with ideas to pitch to a production company a million years ago (this isn’t hyperbole; I am VERY old) and just wrote down “Neurotica”; then it just sort of appeared fully formed. “Neurotica? Oh it’s an over-the-top romantic comedy about a Dominatrix with OCD, of course.” And that just happened to hit the buttons of everything I’m fascinated by.

Neurotica_series_image_1

IFC: How would you describe Ivy?

Jenny: Ivy is everything I love in a comedy character – she’s tenacious, she’s confident, she’s sweet, she’s a big wonderful weirdo.

IFC: How would Ivy’s clientele describe her?

Jenny:  Open-minded, caring, excellent aim.

IFC: Why don’t more small towns have local dungeons?

Jenny: How do you know they don’t?

IFC: What are the pros and cons of joining a chain mega dungeon?

Jenny: You can use any of their locations but you’ll always forget you have a membership and in a year you’ll be like “jeez why won’t they let me just cancel?”

IFC: Mouths are gross! Why is that?

Jenny: If you had never seen a mouth before and I was like “it’s a wet flesh cave with sharp parts that lives in your face”, it would sound like Cronenberg-ian body horror. All body parts are horrifying. I’m kind of rooting for the singularity, I’d feel way better if I was just a consciousness in a cloud.

See the whole season of Neurotica right now on IFC’s Comedy Crib.

The-Craft

The ’90s Are Back

The '90s live again during IFC's weekend marathon.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Everett Digital, Columbia Pictures

We know what you’re thinking: “Why on Earth would anyone want to reanimate the decade that gave us Haddaway, Los Del Rio, and Smash Mouth, not to mention Crystal Pepsi?”

via GIPHY

Thoughts like those are normal. After all, we tend to remember lasting psychological trauma more vividly than fleeting joy. But if you dig deep, you’ll rediscover that the ’90s gave us so much to fondly revisit. Consider the four pillars of true ’90s culture.

Boy Bands

We all pretended to hate them, but watch us come alive at a karaoke bar when “I Want It That Way” comes on. Arguably more influential than Brit Pop and Grunge put together, because hello – Justin Timberlake. He’s a legitimate cultural gem.

Man-Child Movies

Adam Sandler is just behind The Simpsons in terms of his influence on humor. Somehow his man-child schtick didn’t get old until the aughts, and his success in that arena ushered in a wave of other man-child movies from fellow ’90s comedians. RIP Chris Farley (and WTF Rob Schneider).

via GIPHY

via GIPHY

Teen Angst

In horror, dramas, comedies, and everything in between: Troubled teens! Getting into trouble! Who couldn’t relate to their First World problems, plaid flannels, and lose grasp of the internet?

Mainstream Nihilism

From the Coen Bros to Fincher to Tarantino, filmmakers on the verge of explosive popularity seemed interested in one thing: mind f*cking their audiences by putting characters in situations (and plot lines) beyond anyone’s control.

Feeling better about that walk down memory lane? Good. Enjoy the revival.

via GIPHY

And revisit some important ’90s classics all this weekend during IFC’s ’90s Marathon. Check out the full schedule here.