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Kid Cudi Reggie Watts Comedy Bang Bang

Reggie's Back!

10 Hilarious Late Night Bandleader Moments

Reggie Watts stops by Comedy Bang! Bang! Thursday starting at 11P on IFC.

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There’s no job quite like that of a late night bandleader. Being proficient in every type of music imaginable — from hip hop to K-Pop to Opera — isn’t enough. You also have to be able to land a comedy bit, keep the show moving, and always know when to laugh at the host’s jokes. With Reggie Watts returning to Comedy Bang! Bang! this week to offer Kid Cudi some late night comedy show bandleader tips, here are a few supremely talented musicians being drop dead hysterical.


10. Cleto Escobedo III, Jimmy Kimmel Live!

When Jimmy Kimmel was given the keys to his own late night outpost, his first thought was “how can I get Cleto in on this?” Jimmy and Escobedo had grown up together in Vegas, and he’d always considered his longtime friend to be a musical savant. He was worried that ABC wouldn’t sign off on him picking his unknown, childhood friend as bandleader. Thankfully, after taking some execs to a performance, they immediately agreed. Escobedo has gone on to have a well received career fronting Cleto and the Cletones.


9. Doc Severinsen, The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson

Doc first joined the The Tonight Show in the ’50s, during the Steve Allen era. He wouldn’t become the bandleader until 1967. His outrageous fashion sense soon trumped his incredible trumpet playing, becoming a staple of Carson’s nightly monologues. While never a huge part of the comedy, Severson proved he could be a natural when given the chance.


8. Bobby Rosengarden, The Dick Cavett Show

A one of a kind studio musician, Rosengarden played on The Steve Allen Show, The Ernie Kovacs Show and Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show before being given his own band on The Dick Cavett Show. While he wasn’t known for his comedy chops, Bobby and his band could jump in on virtually any song, at a moment’s notice. And because Cavett created such a casual environment — where musicians, actors and newsmakers could show a different side of themselves — it wasn’t rare to see comedians jump in with the band. Granted, Jerry Lewis’ reputation has taken a hit in the last few years. Maybe there’s a better clip.

Hmmm, Woody might be a bit too controversial too.

Oooookay, maybe we should just move on…


7. Jon Batiste, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert

Colbert has said he chose Batiste as the leader of the Late Show band because he enjoyed improvising with him during his Colbert Report appearance. So far the pair have displayed a natural on-air chemistry, whether it’s in a comedy sketch or while grooving to the funky opening theme music.


6. Max Weinberg, Late Night with Conan O’Brien and The Tonight Show with Conan O’Brien

It’s easy to go down a rabbit hole of classic Max bits from the glory days of Late Night. The drummer for Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, Conan gives Max credit for helping the show survive its turbulent, early days. Not a natural comedian, Weinberg carved out a niche for himself by being unfraid to go dark, especially with his sleazy persona. The Max of Late Night fame never met a hooker he didn’t like…at least until they ripped him off.


5. Fred Armisen, Late Night with Seth Meyers

Fred Armisen was a natural to assume the helm of the Late Night band when Seth Meyers took over as host. The duo had long been collaborators and friends on Saturday Night Live. Armisen, who began his career in music, could ably handle the various responsibilities of the job. The only problem is Armisen’s schedule with IFC’s Portlandia and Documentary Now!(Not that we’re complaining.) Still, Fred has created some memorable moments during his time on Late Night.


4. Questlove, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon and The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon

It was quite the coup when Fallon first convinced Questlove and The Roots to be his house band on Late Night. What was a surprise was how adept Questlove proved to be at comedy. Quick with a laugh, he had plenty of personality to provide a counter balance to the show’s antic host. Fallon has excelled at putting his guests in positions where they can be silly and real. The above clip is a perfect example of how that bleeds over to the band as well. Jason Sudeikis was right — when it comes to the North and this video, the Internet never forgets.


3. Paul Shaffer, Late Night w/ David Letterman, The Late Show w/ David Letterman

Paul Shaffer must have been grown in a lab for the express purpose of being a late night bandleader. Few combine the music genius, comedy chops, and outrageous personality of the longtime Letterman sidekick. But Shaffer made a name for himself in the weird nexus of comedy and music long before Letterman came calling. A key part of the Toronto comedy scene that birthed Gilda Radner, Dan Aykroyd and Martin Short, he soon became the keyboard player for Bill Murray’s lounge singer act, an actor in Spinal Tap, a member of the SNL house band and the musical director for none other than The Blues Brothers. It was only a matter of time before he found his way to Late Night and the “World’s Most Dangerous Band.”


2. Reggie Watts, Comedy Bang! Bang!, The Late Late Show with James Corden

Reggie Watts built a career on his unique talent for combining improvisational music genius and downright silliness. As bandleader for Comedy Bang! Bang!, he got to be a much larger part of the action than most musical sidekicks do. While he’s moved on to Corden’s Late Late Show, we’re happy to see him back to his old tricks in his ’80s-themed “How to (Band) Lead” video.


1. Kid Cudi, Comedy Bang! Bang!

Kudi, a rapper first discovered by Kanye West, originally found his fame thanks to a popular mixtape. No one would have suspected his future lay in comedy, but we’re glad he’s chosen Comedy Bang Bang as his new home. Having recently taken over as CBB‘s bandleader and Scott Aukermanck’s musical sidekick, he’s already carving out his own incredible voice, one hilarious song at a time.

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Hacked In

Funny or Die Is Taking Over

FOD TV comes to IFC every Saturday night.

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We’ve been fans of Funny or Die since we first met The Landlord. That enduring love makes it more than logical, then, that IFC is totally cool with FOD hijacking the airwaves every Saturday night. Yes, that’s happening.

The appropriately titled FOD TV looks like something pulled from public access television in the nineties. Like lo-fi broken-antenna reception and warped VHS tapes. Equal parts WTF and UHF.

Get ready for characters including The Shirtless Painter, Long-Haired Businessmen, and Pigeon Man. They’re aptly named, but for a better sense of what’s in store, here’s a taste of ASMR with Kelly Whispers:

Watch FOD TV every Saturday night during IFC’s regularly scheduled movies.

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Wicked Good

See More Evil

Stan Against Evil Season 1 is on Hulu.

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Okay, so you missed the entire first season of Stan Against Evil. There’s no shame in that, per se. But here’s the thing: Season 2 is just around the corner and you don’t want to lag behind. After all, Season 1 had some critical character development, not to mention countless plot twists, and a breathless finale cliffhanger that’s been begging for resolution since last fall. It also had this:

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The good news is that you can catch up right now on Hulu. Phew. But if you aren’t streaming yet, here’s a basic primer…

Willards Mill Is Evil

Stan spent his whole career as sheriff oblivious to the fact that his town has a nasty curse. Mostly because his recently-deceased wife was secretly killing demons and keeping Stan alive.

Demons Really Want To Kill Stan

The curse on Willards Mill stipulates that damned souls must hunt and kill each and every town sheriff, or “constable.” Oh, and these demons are shockingly creative.

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They Also Want To Kill Evie

Why? Because Evie’s a sheriff too, and the curse on Willard’s Mill doesn’t have a “one at a time” clause. Bummer, Evie.

Stan and Evie Must Work Together

Beating the curse will take two, baby, but that’s easier said than done because Stan doesn’t always seem to give a damn. Damn!

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Beware of Goats

It goes without saying for anyone who’s seen the show: If you know that ancient evil wants to kill you, be wary of anything that has cloven feet.

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Season 2 Is Lurking

Scary new things are slouching towards Willards Mill. An impending darkness descending on Stan, Evie and their cohort – eviler evil, more demony demons, and whatnot. And if Stan wants to survive, he’ll have to get even Stanlier.

Stan Against Evil Season 1 is now streaming right now on Hulu.

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SO EXCITED!!!

Reminders that the ’90s were a thing

"The Place We Live" is available for a Jessie Spano-level binge on Comedy Crib.

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Unless you stopped paying attention to the world at large in 1989, you are of course aware that the ’90s are having their pop cultural second coming. Nobody is more acutely aware of this than Dara Katz and Betsy Kenney, two comedians who met doing improv comedy and have just made their Comedy Crib debut with the hilarious ’90s TV throwback series, The Place We Live.

IFC: How would you describe “The Place We Live” to a fancy network executive you just met in an elevator?

Dara: It’s everything you loved–or loved to hate—from Melrose Place and 90210 but condensed to five minutes, funny (on purpose) and totally absurd.

IFC: How would you describe “The Place We Live” to a drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?

Betsy: “Hey Todd, why don’t you have a sip of water. Also, I think you’ll love The Place We Live because everyone has issues…just like you, Todd.”

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IFC: When you were living through the ’90s, did you think it was television’s golden age or the pop culture apocalypse?


Betsy: I wasn’t sure I knew what it was, I just knew I loved it!


Dara: Same. Was just happy that my parents let me watch. But looking back, the ’90s honored The Teen. And for that, it’s the golden age of pop culture. 

IFC: Which ’90s shows did you mine for the series, and why?

Betsy: Melrose and 90210 for the most part. If you watch an episode of either of those shows you’ll see they’re a comedic gold mine. In one single episode, they cover serious crimes, drug problems, sex and working in a law firm and/or gallery, all while being young, hot and skinny.


Dara: And almost any series we were watching in the ’90s, Full House, Saved By the Bell, My So Called Life has very similar themes, archetypes and really stupid-intense drama. We took from a lot of places. 

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IFC: How would you describe each of the show’s characters in terms of their ’90s TV stereotype?

Dara: Autumn (Sunita Mani) is the femme fatale. Robin (Dara Katz) is the book worm (because she wears glasses). Candace (Betsy Kenney) is Corey’s twin and gives great advice and has really great hair. Corey (Casey Jost) is the boy next door/popular guy. Candace and Corey’s parents decided to live in a car so the gang can live in their house. 
Lee (Jonathan Braylock) is the jock.

IFC: Why do you think the world is ready for this series?

Dara: Because everyone’s feeling major ’90s nostalgia right now, and this is that, on steroids while also being a totally new, silly thing.

Delight in the whole season of The Place We Live right now on IFC’s Comedy Crib. It’ll take you back in all the right ways.