DVDs are the new Vinyl

In this crazy digital age, sometimes all we really want is to reach out and touch something. Maybe that’s why so many of us are still gung-ho about owning stuff on DVD. It’s tangible. It’s real. It’s tech from a bygone era that still feels relevant, yet also kitschy and retro. It’s basically vinyl for people born after 1990.

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Inevitably we all have that friend whose love of the disc is so absolutely repellent that he makes the technology less appealing. “The resolution, man. The colors. You can’t get latitude like that on a download.” Go to hell, Tim.

Yes, Tim sucks, and you don’t want to be like Tim, but maybe he’s onto something and DVD is still the future. Here are some benefits that go beyond touch.

It’s Decor and Decorum

With DVDs and a handsome bookshelf you can show off your great taste in film and television without showing off your search history. Good for first dates, dinner parties, family reunions, etc.

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Forget Public Wifi

Warm up that optical drive. No more awkwardly streaming episodes on shady free wifi!

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Internet service goes down. It happens all the time. It could happen right now. Then what? Without a DVD on hand you’ll be forced to make eye contact with your friends and family. Or worse – conversation.

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Self Defense

You can’t throw a download like a ninja star. Think about it.

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If you’d like to experience the benefits DVD ownership yourself, Portlandia Season 7 is now available on DVD and Blue-Ray.

Portlandia Season 6 Now Available On DVD

End of summer got you feeling like:

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Ease into fall with Portlandia‘s sixth season. Relive the latest exploits of Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein’s cast of characters, including Doug and Claire’s poignant breakup, Lance’s foray into intellectual society, and the terrifying rampage of a tsukemen Noodle Monster! Plus, guest stars The Flaming Lips, Glenn Danzig, Louis C.K., Kevin Corrigan, Zoë Kravitz, and more stop by to experience what Portlandia is all about.

Pick up a copy of the DVD today, or watch full episodes and series extras now on IFC.com and the IFC app.

Have a Booze and Pills Party With The Spoils Before Dying DVD

Fans of Will Ferrell, Kristen Wiig, Michael K. Williams, Maya Rudolph, and jazzy songs about booze and pills are in for a treat: today marks the DVD release of the six-part IFC series The Spoils Before Dying, the follow-up to Matt Piedmont and Andrew Steele’s critically acclaimed (and equally hilariously over-the-top) miniseries, The Spoils of Babylon.

The Spoils Before Dying follows a pianist-turned-detective (Williams) who investigates a murder in the 1950s underground jazz scene. The series features a bevy of funny folks in a pitch perfect film noir satire, complete with author/raconteur Eric Jonrosh‘s (Ferrell) signature musings about the making of his banned novel/television masterpiece.

Check out the trailer below, and order the DVD here. You’ll have to supply your own moody lighting and swinging jazz band.

 

 

Get Your Eric Jonrosh Fix With the Spoils of Babylon DVD

Feeling a lack of Eric Jonrosh in your life? In the mood for a heavy dose of melodrama and wonderfully awful wigs? Have we got good news for you. This week, Anchorbay Entertainment is releasing all six parts of Matt Piedmont and Andrew Steele’s 2014 faux miniseries The Spoils of Babylon on DVD on March 8th. Revel in the gorgeously shot, spot-on parody of ’70s and ’80s adapted-for-TV movies starring Tobey Maguire, Kristen Wiig, Tim Robbins, Jessica Alba, Val Kilmer, Haley Joel Osment, Will Ferrell and many more.

Check out the trailer for the Spoils of Babylon DVD release below. Pick up the DVD now and for more Eric Jonrosh, be sure to check out The Spoils Before Dying.

Grab Some Celery and Watch Portlandia Season 4 on DVD Today

Everybody grab your beavers, some celery and two bananas for the perfect daiquiri and get ready to relive all your favorite moments from the 4th season of Portlandia because it comes out on DVD on Aug 26th.

Take a trip down Portlandia memory lane or watch it for the very first time and discover why everyone took up putting hot tubs in their front yards, treating their lovers like dogs, finding date fact checkers, getting tips from the Pull-Out King hunting for fleecy bargains and, of course, worshipping the beaver. Watch guest stars like Steve Buscemi, Kirsten Dunst, Olivia Wilde, Maya Rudolph, k.d. lang, and many more as they take a trip to the wonderful world of Portlandia. Pick up a copy of the DVD today.

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Want the latest news from Portlandia? Like them on Facebook and follow them on Twitter @Portlandia and use the hashtag #portlandia.

Good News: The Birthday Boys Season 1 Is Now on DVD

The Birthday Boys are coming to your living room (or bedroom, or den, or mini-van entertainment system). The silly-yet-smart sketch comedy show from the troupe of the same name is now out on DVD, so you can catch up before Season 2 premieres on Friday, October 17 at 11:30p. The 10-episodes in the series offer hilarious takes on hot topics like Steve Jobs and the rise of the personal computer, Lance Armstrong and the prevalence of performance-enhancing drugs, to the hardships of trying to keep up with too many shows on your DVR all in the same vein of classic sketch shows like Monty Python, Mr. Show and Kids in the Hall. Special features include: audio commentaries, “The Making of Season One,” “From Stage to Screen,” and more.

Want the latest news from The Birthday Boys? Like them on Facebook and follow them on Twitter @BirthdayBoysIFC.

Roman Coppola on “A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III,” Bill Murray and wanting to work with Kristen Stewart

Roman Coppola has been involved in the Hollywood scene for decades, but he rarely is found directly behind the camera. After helming his directorial debut “GQ” in 2001, he has acted primarily as a co-writer, music video director and producer on projects for people like Wes Anderson and his sister Sophia Coppola instead of directing his own features. That changed in 2011 when it was announced that he would tackle the independent movie “A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III,” which he also wrote and was producing.

Years have passed and, after making its premiere at the Rome Film Festival and having a limited run in theaters, “A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III” was released on Blu-ray on May 14. IFC had a chance to talk with Coppola about the movie, the actors he chose to work with and what he plans on working on next.

IFC: Why is this the story that you wanted to tell?

RC: What can I say? Projects sort of choose you. People ask, “Oh, why’d you do this?” “Why’d you choose that?” I find it hard to really answer genuinely because you get something kind of in your mind and it’s an intuitive feeling. In this case, there was a character. I had a sense of this guy that I thought would be a fun to see portrayed. And then he got dumped and how does he react to that? He is kind of a very imaginative kind of character in how he sees things and to use to that as an opportunity to have these kinds of flights of fancy and have the experience of the movie reflect the feeling of what it’s like to be dumped and how your mind is kind of crazed and kaleidoscopic, fractured thoughts. It’s not really an answer I can give, why I chose that. It just sort of chose me. It’s just the character interested me in that world, but it did start with the character and the feeling, this vibe of this kind of cool guy who can’t keep it together when he got dumped.

IFC: What led you to casting Charlie Sheen in that lead role? Did you always know you wanted him, or was there someone else you were considering?

RC: I wrote it without really anyone in mind. As you’re writing, you always think, “Oh, it could be this person or that person,” and you’re sort of open to thinking of people, but I didn’t really have an actor in mind. It wasn’t until I kind of got into the casting process — who could I get to portray this? — that I thought of Charlie. To me, it was sort of a no-brainer in that I needed someone who was the right age, so mid-40s. I needed someone who is handsome and is charming, someone who had wit and this kind of sense of humor, and someone who’s a fine actor, and someone that, to me and maybe people won’t agree with me, but a freshness that you hadn’t really seen on the screen. There’s something fun about presenting someone that has a freshness in a way, and I just thought Charlie had all those qualities in terms of being, as I said, a very good actor, very charming, the right age.

The fact that I knew him personally — I haven’t seen him in many years, but we as kids we were pals during “Apocalypse Now” — that’s also something that means something to me. When you’re trying to make a movie, to reach out to people you have a rapport with and you know, you have sense of who they are, [is nice]. Obviously Jason [Schwartzman] is in the movie, and Patricia Arquette is someone who was part of our family; she was married to my cousin [Nicolas Cage]. Bill Murray is someone who I’ve worked with over the years, so there was a comfort and I think an asset of working with someone who I had this connection to.

IFC: It’s interesting that you call it a “freshness,” because I definitely do feel like we’ve seen a new side of Charlie Sheen since he came out of this difficult time in his life.

RC: I wouldn’t want to make any proclamations, but I think it’s great that you see it that way. It’s interesting because, to me, I think he gives a very good performance in the movie. I think he’s very charming. He’s just a witty guy. I think he’s fun to watch. I think that one of the challenges to the movie — and to me, I see him as the character. He’s Charles Swan III. You know, he’s embodying this character, but I think a lot of people seem, my impression, to have a hard time kind of divorcing all their kind of Internet kind of notions about someone. It’s hard for people to let go of that, so I sort of invite people to say, “Hey look, this is an actor portraying the role.” I think a lot has been made, at least presented to me, like, “Oh Charlie, that’s an odd choice,” or, “Why him?” To me it’s like, he’s so obvious. He’s a great talent. He’s got such charm and wit. It’s so obvious to me, but I guess that’s kind of why I’m just a different person than everyone else.

IFC: Well the parallel obviously is in the name, too. It’s weird seeing him onscreen being called “Charlie” or “Charles” and having to disconnect that.

RC: It’s funny because in “Two and a Half Men” he also plays “Charlie,” in his new show [“Anger Management”] he plays “Charlie,” and I wrote the character “Charlie” as just a name, so that’s a weird interesting coincidence.

Tommy Chong and Cheech Marin talk “Cheech & Chong’s Animated Movie”

Cheech Marin and Tommy Chong have teamed up again in a movie for the first time since their 1984 film “The Corsican Brothers.” The comedy duo are starring in animated comedy “Cheech & Chong’s Animated Movie,” which hit theaters on March 18 and is due on DVD and Blu-ray April 23.

In anticipation of the film’s home video release, IFC caught up with Cheech and Chong to talk about their newest collaboration. The duo, who is gearing up for a tour, also opened up about their career together, their love of marijuana and the two comedians they think are the most progressive right now: Louis CK and Lena Dunham. Read the full interview below.

IFC: Where did the inspiration for this animated movie come from?

Chong: Well, the Chambers brothers, who created the characters and produced the animation movie, it was their brand child. They got our permission to do the characters and of course we had to okay all the characters and the story and stuff like that. We helped them with running it together with Buster the body crab. I was really excited about it because I’ve wanted to get into animation with “Cheech & Chong,” to make us immortal, because we’re already immoral.

IFC: Well you guys already are immortal with your comedy and your other movies.

Chong: No, we want that paycheck to be immortal. Yeah, we want that mailbox going, “Oh, another residual check.” We like that. It really all goes towards golf. We’re supporting golf in this world.

IFC: Do you think this could mean future “Cheech & Chong” animated movies?

Cheech: This is the first of 47 movies we have planned. I hope Fox turns us into “The Simpsons” replacement. I want to be able to come down to the studio once a week and say hi to everybody and maybe do a few hours of voiceover, walk out with a million bucks.

IFC: You worked with the Chambers brothers before on the animated game, right? Do you guys think you’ll continue doing video games as well?

Chong: Yeah we did, the “Cheech & Chong” game.

Cheech: We’re into everything. We’ve got “Cheech & Chong” apps. We’re looking at a line of “Cheech & Chong” condoms.

IFC: I feel like there’s a lot you guys can branch out into.

Chong: I had a girl the other night tell me about vibrating panties.

Cheech: Really?

Chong: Yeah. With a remote control. Yeah. Cheech & Chong vibrating girly panties. Your wife or your girlfriend can be sitting across from you and you hit the button and all of the sudden she’ll get a real look of pleasure on her face.

Cheech: We’d like to do a video game. We’re developing a couple video games through our app, which is called “The Fatty.” You can have access to all the fun games we have in there. We’re adding to that app all the time.

IFC: You guys have been working together for decades and clearly you both still like each other — or at least it seems like you both like each other. How has your relationship evolved over the years?

Chong: Well I’m deaf, so I don’t understand half the things he’s saying. And Cheech’s memory it’s, well, it’s okay. I just recently have been diagnosed with CRS: “Can’t remember shit.” And he’s got this habit of getting married every once in a while.

Cheech: For every marriage you’ve got to have a different fortune, that’s what I’ve been told.

Chong: And we both get hungry around the same time. At the beginning we were like best friends. We’ve never been best friends but we’re brothers. We can love or hate each other, but we’re brothers. There’s a blood link there. You always defend your brother. You can fight with him, but you’re brothers. You can’t ever sever that tie.

Cheech: It’s true.

Clea DuVall talks “Argo”, Ben Affleck, and her favorite project ever

If you don’t immediately recognize the name Clea DuVall, it’s not for lack of a lengthy roster of popular film and television appearances on her resume. She’s had parts in everything from “Can’t Hardly Wait” and “The Faculty” to “Girl, Interrupted” and “Zodiac”. It’s just that she’s not often been at the forefront of those films. DuVall has existed as the sharp, talented character actor that, when you see her, you think, “I’ve seen her before!” That dynamic, however, may be about to change. After excellent performances in 2012’s “Argo” (available on Blu-ray and DVD February 19), the young actress is poised to become one of Hollywood’s hottest properties.

DuVall recently sat down with IFC.com to discuss working with Ben Affleck, holing up with six other actors, and what’s next for her.

IFC: “Argo” is a great film and, I think, rightfully deserves all the awards it’s receiving. Can you tell me how you got involved in the film?

CLEA DUVALL: I had known Ben [Affleck] for a really long time and about a year-and-a-half ago we saw each other. He said, “I’m making this movie and there’s a part I think you’d be really good for. You should come in and talk to me about it.” A few weeks later, I went in and met with Ben and [casting director] Lora Kennedy. He told me about the movie and what would be required of us, which was to live in a house together for a week with nothing from the outside world, and also a lot of improv and things like that. Of course I was like, “Totally!” And then I felt really afraid. [Laughs]

IFC: Were you nervous about taking on such a heavy subject or were those nerves calmed a little because you had already known Ben?

CD: I was definitely nervous, especially because he was asking us to improvise around Iranian politics in 1979. It can be a little daunting, but all it meant is that we really had to know our shit and do the work. I was really excited for the challenge because you don’t always get that kind of opportunity in a film to go that deep.

IFC: You and I were both really young when this whole real-life situation was happening. Did you do a lot of research into the conflict, and the story of these hostages, to prepare for the role?

CD: I did, yeah. I read a lot of books about it and, for each of us, they put together a research packet detailing the people we were playing. I was fortunate enough, as well, to speak with Cora before we started filming, so I was able to sort of pick her brain and see what it was like for her. More the day-to-day of it rather than the high-intensity drama. That was really, really helpful.

IFC: You have this great part in the film that actually feels a lot like an ensemble – the six of you holed up in this house. Tell me a little bit about the dynamic that the six of you had together.

CD: I think Ben was so smart to have us all live together because it really did give the effect that he wanted, which was that we were all people that knew each other very intimately because, by that time, we actually did. We all kind of moved around as this unit. The six of us were always keeping tabs on each other. We were very aware of each other and, I think, that was very important, especially when we got into the scenes that we shot at the bazaar for the location scouting.

You have these people who have been inside for three months terrified for their lives and then, all of a sudden, are thrust into this environment with thousands and thousands of people who, ultimately, want them dead. Creating the authenticity of that experience and having these people around was a little bit of a security blanket effect. It was such a brilliant idea that Ben had. I don’t think that we would have started day one with that dynamic had we not done that.

IFC: Do you think it helped, as well, to create this really claustrophobic, enclosed feeling of those scenes?

CD: Yeah, absolutely. And that cabin fever, stir crazy, high tension feeling was heightened by the experience. It helped to add very subtle layers to all of it. It subconsciously gave us these layers that we definitely would not have had otherwise.

IFC: How was it working with Ben, as he was both directing and starring in the film?

CD: He was amazing. I really was so impressed with how he handled it. I’ve worked with a couple other director/actors who did not handle it with the ease and grace with which he does.

IFC: Are you surprised that he didn’t get the Oscar nomination or is that just sort of par for the course with these types of things?

CD: I was definitely surprised, as everyone else was, but I also think that Ben is the real thing. He’s an amazing filmmaker and he’s probably going to run out of shelf space with all of the awards he’s going to get. I’m sure he’ll have a very long directing career, so I’m not worried about him.

IFC: You’ve done a good amount of TV in the past as well. Do you prefer one medium to the other?

CD: No, not really. I did a show for HBO called “Carnivale” and that was my favorite job I’ve ever had, and what I liked about it was being able to build the character and have her change and evolve.

I think I’ve been really fortunate in the TV that I have done to be able to really explore a character in a way that you can’t really do in film. But I also like film because it is this short window of time and the appreciation for that time is heightened because you know it’s going to end. Your pace is different as an actor working in film rather than TV.

IFC: What’s next for you? I see you have “In Security” coming up. Can you tell me a bit about that film?

CD: That is a little independent film that I was shooting on the weekends while I was making “Argo”. It’s just this cute little movie. I don’t really know what’s happening with it right now. I think they’re trying to go to festivals with it. The indie film world is tough.

I’ve also been working on some behind-the-camera things that I don’t really want to talk about just yet, but it’s looking very promising.

Otherwise, I don’t know. Hopefully something amazing.

IFC: What is the one project in your career that you wish had gotten more recognition or attention?

CD: “Carnivale”, for sure. I think it was just a little bit ahead of its time. I think if it was on now, people would love it. It was the one of the first of what basically ever cable show is now. It was really interesting and different and people couldn’t handle it.

“Argo” arrives on Blu-ray and DVD February 19.

Stephen Chbosky talks “The Perks of Being a Wallflower”, Blu-ray extras, and his favorite teen films

Stephen Chbosky’s much beloved 1999 novel “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” took so long to make it to the silver screen that most fans had nearly given up hope. Little did they know, however, that Chbosky was just biding his time waiting for the right cast to come along to play the emotional roles he’s held so close to his vest for the past decade. More than ten years since the book’s release, 2012 finally saw Chbosky adapt and direct his own novel for the big screen as “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” (available now on Blu-ray and DVD) wowed critics with its unflinching and heartfelt look at teen life, its stellar cast, and its absolute refusal to disappoint the dedicated fans who have waited for so long to see Sam, Charlie, and Patrick come to life.

Chbosky recently sat down with IFC.com to discuss the process of adapting his blockbuster novel, working with his young, talented cast, and the coming-of-age films that inspire him.

IFC: On the Blu-ray bonus features, you mention that “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” took so long to make it to the big screen because you were waiting for this cast. How did you find and assemble this cast, and how did you know it was the right one?

STEPHEN CHBOSKY: Once I was done with the screenplay, I knew what I was looking for, not only in terms of finding great actors, but also finding great people, which was very important. I knew that if I was ever going to truly portray Sam, I couldn’t just find some diva that was going to “play” her. I needed someone who would embody it – somebody kind and generous like Emma [Watson].

We had wonderful casting directors, wonderful producers, and we all had ideas. I just did my work and I saw 500 or 600 kids. There’s always that moment when someone walks in the door, or you’re on Skype with somebody like Nina [Dobrev] in Atlanta or Ezra [Miller] in New York because you don’t have time to fly all these places. Little by little you assemble your cast. It’s a great, great thing.

IFC: What you’ve done on this film is basically the ultimate writer’s dream. You have this huge blockbuster book that’s meant so much to so many people for a very long time, and then you actually get to write the screenplay and direct it. Most writers have zero say in their movie adaptations. How did you pull it off?

SC: Those writers that have zero say in their movie adaptations have zero say because they sell it. If you don’t sell it, and you do it yourself, and you wait until the screenplay is ready, you don’t have to worry about that. I wrote that screenplay until I knew it was as good as it was ever going to be. Then I went and got my producers, and they had a couple of ideas that I didn’t have that made it a little better. Then I got Emma and Logan [Lerman], and they had some thoughts that made me consider some moments that made it better. Ultimately, I was always in charge of this train, and I was never going to give it up.

IFC: So you would have been fine with it if this film never came to be and you just had this great book to hold onto?

SC: I had to be. Listen, I would have been crushed had the movie not happened, but I had to be willing to have it not happen if I was going to do it right.

IFC: Ezra mentioned to me that he and Mae begged you to let their characters be chain smokers like they were in the book. Was there anything in the novel that you wish could have made it to the big screen?

SC: Well, I’m really happy now that the DVD and the Blu-ray is coming out so people can see some of the deleted scenes. I really wanted the subplot of Charlie’s sister. I just felt that, in the context of the movie – and, listen, it was my decision to cut it – that it just made the movie just a little bit edged on the side of too much.

Same with the poem. The poem is gorgeous. As a standalone piece, it’s amazing. There are these moments that, as standalone moments, I think are beautiful, but it’s just that the tree is great, but the forest didn’t work as well with it in there.

It would have been a lot more difficult to cut some things out in the era before the DVD extra because I knew that these things could still live on. I insisted with the studio that we be given a proper budget so that we could scan the negative and mix and score and color correct the deleted scenes. I wanted them to be as good a quality filmmaking as the film itself.

IFC: Were you nervous about how the book would translate to the screen or did all that start to fade away once you locked in your script and you started assembling this amazing cast?

SC: It’s a good question, but I wasn’t really nervous. I was terrified. [Laughs] But in a great way because I just decided early on that this was either going to be everything that I wanted it to be for the book, for myself, and for the fans of the book, or it was not going to exist. And when you put that standard on yourself it makes you work really hard because it’s not about just selling some screenplay or just making some movie. It was about doing it right. I thrived under the pressure, though, so I enjoyed it.

IFC: Teen films these days don’t exactly get the best rap. Are you surprised at all how well the film was received critically?

SC: Yes and no. I knew that when you make an honest movie about what young people go through that you are risking enormous backlash. You know, very often people just want to dismiss what kids go through as trivial. When I was that age, I didn’t think it was trivial or young folly at all. So, in that respect, I was pleasantly surprised that the adult critics embraced it as much as they did.

IFC: The film is steeped in this 1990’s nostalgia, but it also feels really timeless to me. Was it a concern for you guys to make the film have this timeless feel?

SC: Yeah, that was my vision for it. There are a few touches of the 90’s with the music, the cars, a little bit of the fashion, and other things. Some things from the 80’s as well. So there’s enough in there if you want to seek it out.

When I did a study of all the coming-of-age movies that meant a lot to me, whether it was “The Graduate” or “Rebel Without a Cause” or “Dead Poet’s Society” they all had that timeless feel. None of them were completely married to the details of their age. They felt timeless in their treatment of it. That’s what made them resonate with me. That’s what makes those movies still among my absolute favorite movies, and I wanted to follow that tradition.

IFC: I was actually going to ask you what teen or coming-of-age films you enjoyed and may have served as some inspiration for your movie.

SC: There are so many. “Rebel Without a Cause” “The Graduate” “Harold and Maude” “Stand by Me” “Dead Poet’s Society” “The Breakfast Club” and “Juno” I would say those are the big seven.

There have been other great ones. “Election” was great. “Rushmore” was great.

IFC: I’m glad to see “Harold and Maude” in there!

SC: Me too. “Harold and Maude” was a seminal movie for me because it’s not only a beautiful love story, but it’s also about the moment when misfits find each other.

IFC: Can you tell me a little bit about what I thought was one of the best scenes in the film: Ezra, Emma, and Logan dancing to “Come On, Eileen”?

SC: It was in the script. I didn’t specify the song, but I always secretly wanted it to be that song. I picked the song and the first day that I got Ezra, Emma, and Logan together for lunch, I sent Ezra and Emma off with our choreographer to construct the dance. I had some of my own thoughts as well, but I thought, “What better way to bond two people who don’t know each other than to just make them dance together?”

The fact that they both love dancing and they both sing, they have that circus performer spirit in them. It bonded them very quickly.

And Logan just did his job. [Laughs] He knew exactly how to dance off that wall. So cute.

IFC: Do you have a favorite memory of the film, either on screen or off?

SC: I have two. One is certainly watching Emma Watson fly through the tunnel. That was extraordinary. And that’s why I included that entire silent take of her just going through that tunnel in the Blu-ray. There was something about watching her so happy and free going through. I’ll never forget it because I felt like that moment gave her something. Something for the character, yes, but much more importantly something for her life.

This is a young woman who grew up in the eye of a hurricane and who had enormous pressures on her from the time she was nine, ten, eleven years old. This is her just getting to be a kid. So I’ll always treasure that.

The other one is really funny to say because it’s such a small piece of the movie, but it’s prom. We had maybe half an hour to shoot going to the prom limo and the sun was going down and we were always up against it because we were a lower budget movie. I had it scripted, but I just had them do it. What was amazing was watching Emma, Logan, Ezra, and Mae – none of whom ever had prom – this was their prom. These four young people who I adore. They got to have prom, and that meant a lot to me. I’ll always remember that because I’ll always love these kids.

IFC: You actually wrote one of my favorite TV shows of the past decade or so: “Jericho”. There have been so many rumors of the show continuing on Netflix or there being a movie or something else entirely. Have you heard anything positive in that direction?

SC: All of the rumors that you hear? All those conversations? They’re real. Whether or not it’s ever going to happen, I have no idea. I have no control over that. I hope it does for the fans. I hope it does for the cast. I think we had a great ensemble and we have really devoted, terrific fans. So, I hope so, but I don’t know. If you asked me to bet on it, I wouldn’t. I just don’t know what the odds are, but these are real conversations that are happening.

IFC: After this film, you’re going to be a hot commodity in the director’s chair. What’s next for you?

SC: Right now I’m almost at the end of my second novel and I’m going to adapt that book as well.

IFC: It’s not going to take ten years this time, though, right? [Laughs]

SC: No no no. It won’t at all. I found, through the process of doing “The Perks of Being a Wallflower”, that I really love directing movies and I love writing books and so this will become the centerpiece of my career for the next ten or twenty years. Doing these adaptations.

Listen, if something came along that somebody else wrote or an adaptation of another book that I could just do, if I connected to the material, I would love to do that. So I’m always open to it.

In the meantime, I’m just going to keep doing what I do.

Stephen Chbosky’s “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” is available on Blu-ray and DVD now.