Brewsters Millions John Candy Richard Pryor

Comedy Flashback

10 Underrated ’80s Comedies

Catch Footloose, The Breakfast Club and more during IFC's '80s Weekend.

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Photo Credit: Universal/Everett Collection

The 1980s gave us some of the biggest comedy blockbusters in the history of cinema. Even if you didn’t grow up in the Pac-Man and E.T. decade, chances are you can quote a line or two from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off or Ghostbusters. But there are plenty of great comedies from the ’80s that you may have missed on your video store trips. (Remember video stores?) Put on your vintage Vuarnet sunglasses, pop your collar and discover some underrated ’80s comedies. For more great comedy, be sure to catch IFC’s ’80s weekend starting July 29th with a Friday the 13th movie marathon.

10. Max Dugan Returns

Many a teenager in the ’80s most likely first saw Max Dugan Returns after a trip to the mall and a meal at Sizzler with their divorced dad. Marsha Mason reteamed with The Goodbye Girl director Herbert Ross and screenwriter Neil Simon to play a single mom struggling with financial issues, dating and raising her teenage son, played by a pre-Ferris Mathew Broderick. Jason Robards is her estranged but extremely likeable deadbeat dad who returns in hilarious fashion to make good for missing out on his daughter’s life. Broderick’s character, Michael, learns some valuable life lessons from his grandfather, who uses a few aliases, including Gus Lichtenstein. While Ross’ follow-up film, the Kevin Bacon dance classic Footloose, is better remembered, Max Dugan Returns has developed a cult following over the years thanks to its smart script and winning performances.


9. Brewster’s Millions

What better time than during this election year to watch Brewster’s Millions, a movie about a man who became a millionaire and then ran for public office and told people not to vote for him or anyone else? Richard Pryor shines as Monty Brewster, a washed-up pitcher for the Hackensack Bulls who gets the opportunity of a lifetime when he finds out he had a crotchety old tycoon for an uncle (Hume Cronyn in a hilarious cameo) who had nobody else to leave his money to. But, there’s a catch — he has to spend $30 million dollars in 30 days in order to inherit the $300 million dollar fortune. If he fails, all he’ll end up with is the Cubs shirt on his back. Along the way, Brewster becomes a celeb and confounds his friend (played by John Candy) and a possible love interest who thinks the money has driven him mad. Directed by Walter Hill (48 Hrs.), Brewster’s Millions is a still topical satire of the haves and have nots that would make for a great double feature with Trading Places.


8. Top Secret!

Top Secret! is a comedy from the guys who brought you Airplane!, the movie that redefined comedy films and spoof movies. This time spoofing World War II movies and the ridiculous Elvis rock music films of the ‘60s, the Zucker Brothers and Jim Abrahams fill Top Secret! with a plethora of jokes and funny sight gags. A then unknown Val Kilmer provides just the right amount of charm as the cocky, yet innocently dumb rock n’ roll star that gets mixed up with the French Resistance in order to defeat those pesky Nazis. You have to love a movie that has an underwater Old West-style bar fight scene and a scene filmed completely in reverse, just for the hell of it.


7. Midnight Madness

Midnight Madness is sort of like an ’80s remake of It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World that also is quite possibly the inspiration for The Amazing Race. Featuring a young Michael J. Fox and a cameo from a pre-Pee-wee Paul Reubens, Midnight Madness taps into every kid’s dream of taking part in a massive scavenger hunt. Each team represents high school groups like the jocks, nerds, sorority girls and a motley team of cheating idiots led by Stephen Furst, aka Flounder in Animal House. A goofy, kid-friendly gem, Midnight Madness has stuck with anyone who saw it as a child.


6. Lost In America

In the past few years with his work in films like Drive and Finding Dory, Albert Brooks has been riding a wave of success with a younger generation of moviegoers. But in the ’70s and ’80s, Brooks was also making a neurotic name for himself as a writer/actor/director in films like Real Life, Modern Romance and the classic comedy Lost in America. In Lost in America, Albert Brooks and Julie Hagerty (of Airplane! fame) play a L.A. couple who decide to give up their yuppie life and travel the country in a Winnebago. They soon discover that it’s not easy to replace a six figure salary in the middle-of-nowhere Arizona. Brooks’ neurotic everyman hilariously goes from ad exec to school crossing guard and the couple hit rock bottom as they head towards a breakdown in this pitch perfect satire of the baby boomer decade.


5. Vampire’s Kiss

Need a reminder of the days when Nicolas Cage starred in great quirky comedies? Take a bite out of Vampire’s Kiss, which is as close to a quintessential Nic Cage role as you can get. Cage sinks his teeth (pun intended) into the role of an unstable man who is convinced he’s becoming a vampire. The scenes in which Cage’s character embraces his dark side as he puts his secretary (Maria Conchita Alonzo) through hell are as gleefully entertaining as they are psychotically disturbing. If you’ve ever wanted to see Nic Cage eat a cockroach, then this is the movie for you.


4. The ‘Burbs

A twisted comedy from director Joe Dante (Gremlins), The ‘Burbs shows us that life in the suburbs is not really filled with “shiny, happy, people.” Tom Hanks leads a cast of nosy neighbors, including ex-Vietman Vet Lt. Mark Rumsfield (Bruce Dern) and comedian Rick Ducommun (Groundhog Day) as Art Weingartner. When the creepy and reclusive neighbors The Klopeks move next door to Hanks’ Ray Peterson, Art, Ray and Rumsfield begin to let their suspicions about the new neighbors get the best of them. The trio come to think that the Klopeks have killed their neighbor Walter Seznick and begin digging themselves a deeper hole of paranoia that may or may not be totally in their heads. Look for Corey Feldman in one of his last teenage roles as Ricky Butler and Carrie Fisher as Ray’s doubting wife, in a movie that makes the city look pretty appealing.


3. Used Cars

Before Back to the Future, Robert Zemeckis directed this uproarious look at sleazy used car salesmen. When the owner of a used car lot is killed, Kurt Russell and his ethically challenged crew do whatever they can to keep the lot from being taken by their boss’ sleazy brother, played by legendary character comic actor Jack Warden at his crotchety best. From burying their boss’ body in the lot, to interrupting the President’s speech with a live commercial, the guys at the used car lot hilariously wheel and deal. What’s not to love about a movie that shoots the s*** out of high prices??


2. After Hours

Not only is After Hours one of the most underrated comedies of the ’80s, it’s also one of the most underrated Martin Scorsese films. The Goodfellas guru opts for dark comedy here, as Griffin Dunne’s corporate drone encounters a bevy of bizarre characters on his quest to get back home over the course of one crazy night in the Big Apple. A surreal vision of the days when downtown Manhattan was actually seedy, After Hours has developed a cult following over the years thanks to hilarious turns from everyone from Catherine O’Hara to Cheech and Chong.


1. The Man with Two Brains

While The Jerk might be the best known of Carl Reiner and Steve Martin’s comedy collaborations, The Man with Two Brains has some of the most spit-take inducing moments of hilarity in a film from the ’80s or any decade. Martin plays Dr. Hfuhruhurr, (which sounds exactly as it is spelled), a lovesick widower who hits a woman with his car but luckily is a world renowned brain surgeon who can save her life. It’s a tale not quite as old as time, as he falls for his beautiful patient (Kathleen Turner), who then takes pleasure in driving her new husband crazy while withholding sex in hilarious ways until the doctor makes a citizen’s divorce on their trip to Europe. This is where Hfuhruhurr meets the love of his life, a woman named Ann Uumellmahaye (also spelled like it sounds), who happens to be the voice of a disembodied brain in a jar. The Man with Two Brains has everything you could want in a great comedy — Steve Martin at his wacky best, a hilariously difficult drunk test (watch it above) and other absurd gags like a four-year old who thinks she can diagnose an epidural hematoma.

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Bro and Tell

BFFs And Night Court For Sports

Bromance and Comeuppance On Two New Comedy Crib Series

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“Silicon Valley meets Girls meets black male educators with lots of unrealized potential.”

That’s how Carl Foreman Jr. and Anthony Gaskins categorize their new series Frank and Lamar which joins Joe Schiappa’s Sport Court in the latest wave of new series available now on IFC’s Comedy Crib. To better acquaint you with the newbies, we went right to the creators for their candid POVs. And they did not disappoint. Here are snippets of their interviews:

Frank and Lamar

via GIPHY

IFC: How would you describe Frank and Lamar to a fancy network executive you met in an elevator?
Carl: Best bros from college live and work together teaching at a fancy Manhattan private school, valiantly trying to transition into a more mature phase of personal and professional life while clinging to their boyish ways.

IFC: And to a friend of a friend you met in a bar?
Carl: The same way, slightly less coherent.

Anthony: I’d probably speak about it with much louder volume, due to the bar which would probably be playing the new Kendrick Lamar album. I might also include additional jokes about Carl, or unrelated political tangents.

Carl: He really delights in randomly slandering me for no reason. I get him back though. Our rapport on the page, screen, and in real life, comes out of a lot of that back and forth.

IFC: In what way is Frank and Lamar a poignant series for this moment in time?
Carl: It tells a story I feel most people aren’t familiar with, having young black males teach in a very affluent white world, while never making it expressly about that either. Then in tackling their personal lives, we see these three-dimensional guys navigate a pivotal moment in time from a perspective I feel mainstream audiences tend not to see portrayed.

Anthony: I feel like Frank and Lamar continues to push the envelope within the genre by presenting interesting and non stereotypical content about people of color. The fact that this show brought together so many talented creative people, from the cast and crew to the producers, who believe in the project, makes the work that much more intentional and truthful. I also think it’s pretty incredible that we got to employ many of our friends!

Sport Court

Sport Court gavel

IFC: How would you describe Sport Court to a fancy network executive you met in an elevator?
Joe: SPORT COURT follows Judge David Linda, a circuit court judge assigned to handle an ad hoc courtroom put together to prosecute rowdy fan behavior in the basement of the Hartford Ultradome. Think an updated Night Court.

IFC: How would you describe Sport Court to drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?
Joe: Remember when you put those firecrackers down that guy’s pants at the baseball game? It’s about a judge who works in a court in the stadium that puts you in jail right then and there. I know, you actually did spend the night in jail, but imagine you went to court right that second and didn’t have to get your brother to take off work from GameStop to take you to your hearing.

IFC: Is there a method to your madness when coming up with sports fan faux pas?
Joe: I just think of the worst things that would ruin a sporting event for everyone. Peeing in the slushy machine in open view of a crowd seemed like a good one.

IFC: Honestly now, how many of the fan transgressions are things you’ve done or thought about doing?
Joe: I’ve thought about ripping out a whole row of chairs at a theater or stadium, so I would have my own private space. I like to think of that really whenever I have to sit crammed next to lots of people. Imagine the leg room!

Check out the full seasons of Frank and Lamar and Sport Court now on IFC’s Comedy Crib.

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Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

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He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

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GIFS via Giphy

On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

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