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American Flashback

See the American Pie Cast Then and Now

Catch the American Pie movies this month on IFC.

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Universal Pictures

Starring a cast of mostly unknowns, and reviving the raunchy teen comedy genre that had been dead and buried for more than a decade, no one knew what to expect of American Pie when it debuted back in the summer of 1999. But after earning $235 million dollars, spawning eight sequels, and creating one of the most famous pie-based sex scenes in movie history, it’s legendary status is secure. At the time, the film launched a slew of unknown actors into the stratosphere. Some have come back down to Earth hard, while others are just getting started. Much like band camp, let’s look back at the fun we had, and then see where the cast is now.

Jason Biggs (Jim Levenstein)

Universal Pictures
Universal Pictures

Then: Like much of the cast, Jason Biggs was a fresh face when he landed the lead role in American Pie. His previous credits were scant, with a stint on the daytime soap As The World Turns and a Broadway turn opposite Judd Hirsch in Conversations with My Father being the highlights.

Lionsgate Television

Lionsgate Television

Now: While still largely known for his work in the American Pie series, Biggs has had success on the small screen of late. His turn as convict Piper Chapman’s estranged husband Larry on Orange is the New Black got some attention, and kids may recognize his voice as Leonardo on the animated series Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. But he’s sadly gotten the most attention for being a Twitter troll, making fun of everything from racial issues, to dead celebrities, to the Malaysian plane crash. It has not gone over well.


Chris Klein (Chris “Oz” Ostreicher)

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

Then: Another unknown at the time, Chris Klein broke out big in 1999, staring in blockbuster American Pie and indie darling Election. It was actually the latter that he shot first, after director Alexander Payne discovered him in the halls of his high school while location scouting for the movie.

Comedy Central

Comedy Central

Now: Klein has had an admittedly tough go of it since the American Pie films ran their course. Beyond losing girlfriend Katie Holmes to Tom Cruise, he also battled alcohol issues and checked himself into rehab back in 2010. He’s since been working on a comeback, popping up on FX’s Wilfred and Comedy Central’s Idiotsitter.


Alyson Hannigan (Michelle Flaherty)

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

Then: Hannigan, a former child actor, was making a name for herself as nerdy best friend Willow on Buffy The Vampire Slayer when American Pie came knocking. The filmmakers originally wanted her to play the part of Heather, which would go to Mena Suvari, but Hannigan thought band camp loving Michelle seemed like more fun.

20th Century Fox Television

20th Century Fox Television

Now: With seven seasons of Buffy, four American Pie movies, and nine seasons on How I Met Your Mother, Hannigan has had one of the best runs of any Pie alum. Now raising a family, she’s slowed down a bit, with her most recent part being a cameo on the CBS sitcom The McCarthys.


Shannon Elizabeth (Nadia)

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

Then: Elizabeth began her career as a model, before booking small parts on TV shows like Arli$$ and USA High. She was perhaps best known for getting offed by a snowman in the direct-to-video horror cheesefest Jack Frost before her big break in American Pie came about.

ABC Family Original Productions

ABC Family Original Productions

Now: Elizabeth had a bit of a hot streak after American Pie, booking big parts in movies like Scary Movie, Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back and Thir13en Ghosts. While she’s continued to work steadily, more recent projects like In The Dark and A Green Story haven’t gotten as much traction. But the good news is, with a bit more time on her hands, she began a second career as a professional poker player, and has kicked butt, landing in the money at the World Series of Poker.


Tara Reid (Vicky Lathum)

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

Then: A child actor best known for a litany of commercials, Reid had costarred in movies as diverse as Urban Legend and The Big Lebowski when she signed on to play Vicky in American Pie.

SyFy Films

SyFy Films

Now: Reid seemed to be on her way to becoming a big star when a wardrobe malfunction on the red carpet turned her into a walking punchline. In the years since, she’s worked to rebuild her career, starring in camp classics like the Sharknado films and The Hungover Games.


Eddie Kaye Thomas (Paul Finch)

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

Then: A child actor who’d appeared on Broadway opposite Natalie Portman in The Diary of Anne Frank, Kaye Thomas only had a few small parts to his name when he landed the role of cougar hunter Paul Finch in American Pie. 

Eddie Kaye Thomas Scorpion

CBS

Now: After the breakout hit of American Pie, Kaye started acting in a slew of movies, even landing the title role in Freddy Got Fingered. In more recent years, he’s probably best known for voicing Barry Robinson on the Seth MacFarlane animated series American Dad!, and popping up in shows like ‘Til Death and How to Make It in America. These days, he can be found starring on the CBS drama Scorpion.


Seann William Scott (Steve Stifler)

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

Then: Stifler, the party bro who loves beer and babes in equal measure, was Scott’s big screen debut. Conceived more as a bit part than a costar at the time, Scott was paid only $8,000 for his time. Thankfully, the role would turn Scott into a breakout star.

FX Productions

FX Productions

Now: Scott went on to star in a succession of hits, including Final Destination, Dude, Where’s My Car? and The Rundown. But his new lifestyle would catch up with him, and he entered rehab in 2011 for “health and personal issues.” Since completing his treatment, he’s slowly made his way back into the fold, starring in the hockey comedy Goon and a classic episode of the FX hit It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.


Mena Suvari (Heather)

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

Then: 1999 was a big year for Suvari. After working sporadically for years as a child actor, she broke into the big time with the one/two punch of American Pie and American Beauty. This all-American year helped turn her into a star and sex symbol galore.

Blumhouse Television

Blumhouse Television

Now: While Suvari has worked steadily since her breakout year, popping up in everything from Six Feet Under to American Horror Story, she’s never again been the center of attention. In recent years she’s starred on the WE tv horror drama South of Hell, and focused on her charity work, with such organizations as Starlight Children’s Foundation and the “End Violence Against Women” campaign.


Thomas Ian Nicholas (Kevin Myers)

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

Then: Thomas Ian Nicholas was arguably the biggest star amongst the teens cast in American Pie. You probably remember him as the titular kid(s) in A Kid in King Arthur’s Court and Rookie of the Year.

ABC Studios

ABC Studios

Now: Ian Nicholas has worked steadily over the last 20 years, playing Abbie Hoffman in The Chicago 8 and guest starring on hits like Grey’s Anatomy and Party of Five. Still, his real focus seems to be music. He released his first album, Without Warning, in 2008, and even got a song on the American Reunion soundtrack. He has since recorded with Blues Traveler and sung the national anthem at a Cubs game.


Natasha Lyonne (Jessica)

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

Then: The other legit star of the American Pie teens, Lyonne had already fronted Slums of Beverly Hills and had a role in Woody Allen’s Everybody Says I Love You. She was also popular for playing Opal on Pee-Wee’s Playhouse.

IFC Originals

IFC Originals

Now: A serious drug addiction almost sidelined her career, but thankfully Natasha got clean, and returned to acting full-time. Since sobering up, she’s had an impressive resurgence, starring alongside Pie vet Jason Biggs on Netflix’s Orange Is the New Black, and recurring on IFC’s Portlandia.


John Cho (John)

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

Then: Cho had just a few small, bit parts to his name when he was cast in American Pie. While this was another blink-and-you’ll-miss-it role, the movie was such a massive hit, even the small parts led to stardom. In a Reddit AMA, Cho said “I was out of the country, shooting another movie, and had missed the release of American Pie, and was unaware it was a really big hit. So I came back to America, and kids were chanting ‘MILF! MILF!’ at me on the street. And I was really confused, and it took me a while to understand what was happening actually.”

Paramount Pictures

Paramount Pictures

Now: Cho has since become a big star, fronting the Harold and Kumar franchise, and playing Enterprise helmsman Hikaru Sulu in the Star Trek films. He’s also been named one of the sexiest men alive by People magazine not once, but twice, boldly going where no American Pie cast member had gone before.


Chris Owen (The Sherminator)

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

Then: Owen had booked a few small parts in the years preceding American Pie. Most notably, he had a bit part opposite longtime friend and collaborator Charlie Talbert in the family film Angus. Still, it was “The Sherminator” that would come to define his career, for better or worse.

Universal

Universal

Now: While Owen hasn’t struggled for work, his association with the American Pie franchise has defined his career. He popped up in a number of similarly raunchy National Lampoon movies, including National Lampoon’s Gold Diggers and National Lampoon Presents Dorm Daze 1 and 2.


Eugene Levy (Jim’s Dad)

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

Then: Levy was already hugely popular in comedy circles, having starring on SCTV, and popped up in classic movies like Splash, Armed and Dangerous and Waiting for Guffman. But it was the part of Jim’s Dad that would prove to be a mainstream breakthrough for the comic with the caterpillar eyebrows.

Not a Real Company Productions

Not a Real Company Productions

Now: Levy has continued his hall-of-fame career over the last two decades, continuing to star in Christopher Guest directed classics like A Mighty Wind and For Your Consideration. He’s also proved to be a loyal American Pie costar, appearing alongside Tara Reid in Josie and the Pussycats and Sean William Scott in Goon. And god love him, he’s appeared as Jim’s dad (aka Noah Levenstein) in every American Pie sequel, including four straight-to-video releases.


Jennifer Coolidge (Stifler’s Mom)

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

Then: Coolidge was an alum of the legendary comedy school The Groundlings, but she had struggled to book a breakout part when American Pie came around. She was perhaps best known as the masseuse Jerry dated on an episode of Seinfeld, when she landed the part of Stifler’s randy mother.

Warner Brothers Television

Warner Brothers Television

Now: Playing the hottest mom in film since The Graduate launched Coolidge to another level. She went on to costar in everything from Legally Blonde to Sex in the City, and starred in a run of Christopher Guest’s improv mockumentaries, like Best in Show, A Mighty Wind, and For Your Consideration, alongside Pie vet Eugene Levy. Lately, she has been a regular on the long running CBS hit 2 Broke Girls.

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Bro and Tell

BFFs And Night Court For Sports

Bromance and Comeuppance On Two New Comedy Crib Series

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“Silicon Valley meets Girls meets black male educators with lots of unrealized potential.”

That’s how Carl Foreman Jr. and Anthony Gaskins categorize their new series Frank and Lamar which joins Joe Schiappa’s Sport Court in the latest wave of new series available now on IFC’s Comedy Crib. To better acquaint you with the newbies, we went right to the creators for their candid POVs. And they did not disappoint. Here are snippets of their interviews:

Frank and Lamar

via GIPHY

IFC: How would you describe Frank and Lamar to a fancy network executive you met in an elevator?
Carl: Best bros from college live and work together teaching at a fancy Manhattan private school, valiantly trying to transition into a more mature phase of personal and professional life while clinging to their boyish ways.

IFC: And to a friend of a friend you met in a bar?
Carl: The same way, slightly less coherent.

Anthony: I’d probably speak about it with much louder volume, due to the bar which would probably be playing the new Kendrick Lamar album. I might also include additional jokes about Carl, or unrelated political tangents.

Carl: He really delights in randomly slandering me for no reason. I get him back though. Our rapport on the page, screen, and in real life, comes out of a lot of that back and forth.

IFC: In what way is Frank and Lamar a poignant series for this moment in time?
Carl: It tells a story I feel most people aren’t familiar with, having young black males teach in a very affluent white world, while never making it expressly about that either. Then in tackling their personal lives, we see these three-dimensional guys navigate a pivotal moment in time from a perspective I feel mainstream audiences tend not to see portrayed.

Anthony: I feel like Frank and Lamar continues to push the envelope within the genre by presenting interesting and non stereotypical content about people of color. The fact that this show brought together so many talented creative people, from the cast and crew to the producers, who believe in the project, makes the work that much more intentional and truthful. I also think it’s pretty incredible that we got to employ many of our friends!

Sport Court

Sport Court gavel

IFC: How would you describe Sport Court to a fancy network executive you met in an elevator?
Joe: SPORT COURT follows Judge David Linda, a circuit court judge assigned to handle an ad hoc courtroom put together to prosecute rowdy fan behavior in the basement of the Hartford Ultradome. Think an updated Night Court.

IFC: How would you describe Sport Court to drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?
Joe: Remember when you put those firecrackers down that guy’s pants at the baseball game? It’s about a judge who works in a court in the stadium that puts you in jail right then and there. I know, you actually did spend the night in jail, but imagine you went to court right that second and didn’t have to get your brother to take off work from GameStop to take you to your hearing.

IFC: Is there a method to your madness when coming up with sports fan faux pas?
Joe: I just think of the worst things that would ruin a sporting event for everyone. Peeing in the slushy machine in open view of a crowd seemed like a good one.

IFC: Honestly now, how many of the fan transgressions are things you’ve done or thought about doing?
Joe: I’ve thought about ripping out a whole row of chairs at a theater or stadium, so I would have my own private space. I like to think of that really whenever I have to sit crammed next to lots of people. Imagine the leg room!

Check out the full seasons of Frank and Lamar and Sport Court now on IFC’s Comedy Crib.

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Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

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He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

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GIFS via Giphy

On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

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