Scott Pilgrim Brie Larson

Brie Sharp

10 Brie Larson Performances Worth Checking Out

Find out if Brie Larson wins big at the 2016 Spirit Awards live Saturday Feb. 27th at 5P ET on IFC.

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Photo Credit: Universal Pictures

It’s possible you hadn’t heard of Brie Larson until she starred alongside Amy Schumer in last summer’s hit comedy Trainwreck, or started winning every award these past few months for her remarkable turn in the emotionally-charged drama Room. But the immensely likable 26 year-old actress has been amassing credits for two decades in a variety of projects. She may not have always been the star, but her honest, natural performances have always stood out. Before you catch her at the 2016 Spirit Awards on February 27th on IFC, take a look at our list of Brie Larson performances you may have overlooked to see for yourself why she will soon be someone you won’t forget.

1. Short Term 12

Destin Daniel Cretton’s 2013 indie feature was a breakout role for Larson, earning her rave reviews, her first Spirit Award nomination, and plenty of Oscar buzz. The film, based on Cretton’s own experiences, is about twentysomething Grace, a supervisor at a group home in Los Angeles for troubled adolescents who struggles to connect with a new female resident prone to violent outbursts. Complications arise when Grace becomes pregnant, and she is forced to make some difficult decisions regarding her future. Larson’s performance as Grace, much like in Room, is alternately fierce and fragile and full of raw emotions simmering just below the surface.


2. The Spectacular Now

Though The Spectacular Now mostly focuses on the budding relationship between charismatic senior Sutter (Miles Teller) and shy girl Aimee (Shailene Woodley), it is Brie Larson’s Cassidy who becomes the fulcrum for Sutter’s sudden change in direction. A budding alcoholic, Sutter is the life of every party. Cassidy, realizing he has become more than she can handle, breaks up with him, causing Sutter to drink until he passes out on Aimee’s lawn. As Sutter bonds with Aimee, he still finds himself longing for Cassidy, trying to talk to her at parties or through text messages. Cassidy reaches a breaking point and tells Sutter she can no longer have his influence in her life and has to grow up even if he refuses to. Larson’s lovely, aching performance is imbued with an underlying strength: when you see Cassidy toward the end of the film, you know she’s going to be okay.


3. The United States of Tara

Larson played a rebellious daughter struggling to deal with both her mother’s dissociative identity disorder and her own personal foibles in Diablo Cody’s acclaimed Showtime series. Both Toni Collette and Larson were singled out for their performances over the show’s three season run, and for Larson especially, The United States of Tara proved to be yet another great launching pad for the actress.


4. 21 Jump Street

Nobody thought a film adaptation of the ’80s teen series that launched Johnny Depp’s career was a good idea at first, but filmmakers Chris Miller and Phil Lord managed to deliver a self-referential winking homage to the show and a bonafide box office hit. When former high school classmates turned bumbling police officers Schmidt (Hill) and Jenko (Channing Tatum) are assigned to go undercover at a local high school, they find themselves struggling to fit in. While Jenko finds his place with the nerds, Schmidt befriends popular kid-turned-drug dealer Eric (Dave Franco) and develops a crush on Eric’s friend Molly (Brie Larson). While Larson has been relegated to “girlfriend” roles before, she makes Molly charming, relatable, and totally crush-worthy.


5. Scott Pilgrim vs. the World

Based on the graphic novel by Bryan Lee O’Malley, Edgar Wright’s hyperkinetic film finds bass guitarist Scott Pilgrim (Michael Cera) battling his dream girl Ramona Flowers’ (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) seven evil exes in highly stylized combat sequences. Brie Larson has a few memorable scenes as Scott’s ex-girlfriend, Envy Adams, a famous rocker who is now dating Todd Ingram (Brandon Routh), one of Ramona’s exes. Larson seems to relish playing the bad girl, commanding both Scott’s and the audience’s attention. With her leather jacket and prickly insults, she’s one badass you don’t want to mess with. Larson also did all her own singing for the film, performing a cover of “Black Sheep” by the band Metric.


6. The Gambler

Brie Larson plays second fiddle to Mark Wahlberg’s titular gambler in this remake of the 1974 James Caan classic. As Amy, a gambling house waitress/brilliant lit student, Larson is once again a tough but charming tonic to a troubled leading man. The Gambler wasn’t quite the critical or box office success as its 1974 incarnation, but both Larson and a terrific Jessica Lange received much praise.


7. Greenberg

Larson has a small but memorable role in Noah Baumbach’s 2010 dramedy as the niece of Ben Stiller’s misanthropic character. While he is house-sitting for brother Phillip (Chris Messina) in Los Angeles and romancing dog-walker Florence (Greta Gerwig), Roger throws a party with his niece, Sara, who invites all her friends over. They all do drugs together, and Sara invites Roger to join her on her trip to Australia the next day. Larson and Dave Franco would go on to work together again two years later in 21 Jump Street.


8. Rampart

In another small but memorable role, Brie Larson once again makes an impressive mark as the daughter of Woody Harrelson’s volatile LAPD officer in this 2011 drama from director Oren Moverman. The film deals with the fallout from the Rampart scandal in the late ’90s, which blew the lid on extreme police brutality in the Rampart district of Los Angeles. While Harrelson’s life on the force is crumbling around him, so too is his personal life with his ex-wives and daughters. After her first day of shooting, Moverman was so impressed by Larson, he re-wrote the script to flesh out her relationship with Harrelson’s character.


9. Community

NBC

NBC

Due to its channel-hopping, schedule-misshaps, and showrunner-shuffling, you could be forgiven for forgetting Brie Larson guest-starred in three episodes of this cult comedy series. Her plucky coat-check girl, Rachel, was introduced in season four when she helped Abed (Danny Pudi) carry out his charade of escorting two different dates to the dance. Abed realized he was actually beginning to have feelings for Rachel instead and wound up escorting her for the remainder of the dance. Larson turned up again in season five, this time dating Abed and becoming the “Aww Couple,” because everyone thinks they’re so cute. Sadly, their romance winds up a brief one after a game night with Rachel’s VCR board game goes disastrously wrong.


10. Digging for Fire

Director Joe Swanberg’s dramedy may be about teacher/husband/father Tim (New Girl‘s Jake Johnson, who also co-wrote the script) finding a bone and rusty gun in the backyard of his vacation home, but it’s really a tale of marriage, fidelity, and mortality. Larson turns up as Max, a beautiful young woman who peaks Tim’s interest as they go looking for answers to the mystery of the bone and gun. The duo’s will-they-or-won’t-they tension provides plenty of complicated layers for Larson and Johnson to play, but they make it all look effortless, and Larson once again shines.

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Bro and Tell

BFFs And Night Court For Sports

Bromance and Comeuppance On Two New Comedy Crib Series

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“Silicon Valley meets Girls meets black male educators with lots of unrealized potential.”

That’s how Carl Foreman Jr. and Anthony Gaskins categorize their new series Frank and Lamar which joins Joe Schiappa’s Sport Court in the latest wave of new series available now on IFC’s Comedy Crib. To better acquaint you with the newbies, we went right to the creators for their candid POVs. And they did not disappoint. Here are snippets of their interviews:

Frank and Lamar

via GIPHY

IFC: How would you describe Frank and Lamar to a fancy network executive you met in an elevator?
Carl: Best bros from college live and work together teaching at a fancy Manhattan private school, valiantly trying to transition into a more mature phase of personal and professional life while clinging to their boyish ways.

IFC: And to a friend of a friend you met in a bar?
Carl: The same way, slightly less coherent.

Anthony: I’d probably speak about it with much louder volume, due to the bar which would probably be playing the new Kendrick Lamar album. I might also include additional jokes about Carl, or unrelated political tangents.

Carl: He really delights in randomly slandering me for no reason. I get him back though. Our rapport on the page, screen, and in real life, comes out of a lot of that back and forth.

IFC: In what way is Frank and Lamar a poignant series for this moment in time?
Carl: It tells a story I feel most people aren’t familiar with, having young black males teach in a very affluent white world, while never making it expressly about that either. Then in tackling their personal lives, we see these three-dimensional guys navigate a pivotal moment in time from a perspective I feel mainstream audiences tend not to see portrayed.

Anthony: I feel like Frank and Lamar continues to push the envelope within the genre by presenting interesting and non stereotypical content about people of color. The fact that this show brought together so many talented creative people, from the cast and crew to the producers, who believe in the project, makes the work that much more intentional and truthful. I also think it’s pretty incredible that we got to employ many of our friends!

Sport Court

Sport Court gavel

IFC: How would you describe Sport Court to a fancy network executive you met in an elevator?
Joe: SPORT COURT follows Judge David Linda, a circuit court judge assigned to handle an ad hoc courtroom put together to prosecute rowdy fan behavior in the basement of the Hartford Ultradome. Think an updated Night Court.

IFC: How would you describe Sport Court to drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?
Joe: Remember when you put those firecrackers down that guy’s pants at the baseball game? It’s about a judge who works in a court in the stadium that puts you in jail right then and there. I know, you actually did spend the night in jail, but imagine you went to court right that second and didn’t have to get your brother to take off work from GameStop to take you to your hearing.

IFC: Is there a method to your madness when coming up with sports fan faux pas?
Joe: I just think of the worst things that would ruin a sporting event for everyone. Peeing in the slushy machine in open view of a crowd seemed like a good one.

IFC: Honestly now, how many of the fan transgressions are things you’ve done or thought about doing?
Joe: I’ve thought about ripping out a whole row of chairs at a theater or stadium, so I would have my own private space. I like to think of that really whenever I have to sit crammed next to lots of people. Imagine the leg room!

Check out the full seasons of Frank and Lamar and Sport Court now on IFC’s Comedy Crib.

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Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

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He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

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GIFS via Giphy

On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

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