Clue Cast

You Rang, Sir?

The 10 Best Butlers From Pop Culture

Catch back-to-back episodes of the classic sitcom Soap Saturday mornings on IFC.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Paramount

When you need tea, you ring for the butler. When the doorbell rings, the butler answers the door. When you’re a billionaire playboy moonlighting as a caped vigilante superhero, the butler makes you a fabulous costume. And when you need life advice delivered in the form of sassy one-liners, the butler is there to dish it out alongside your perfectly prepared dinner. In honor of Benson, the loyal butler from the classic sitcom Soap (now airing on IFC!), we’ve compiled a list of loyal and hilarious pop culture butlers to give them the praise they justly deserve.

1. Alfred Pennyworth, Batman

If you ask anyone to name one butler, they will most likely choose Bruce Wayne’s faithful right-hand man, Alfred Pennyworth. Following the murder of Thomas and Martha Wayne, Alfred not only became Bruce’s sole caretaker, he became his surrogate parent. Since first appearing in the comics in Batman #16 way back in 1943, Alfred has had Bruce’s best interests at heart whether it’s in business, romance, or fighting crime. On the big and small screen, Alfred has been played by everyone from Alan Napier on the 1960s TV series to Jeremy Irons in the upcoming Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Girlfriends and archenemies may come and go, but Alfred is truly forever.


2. Carson, Downton Abbey

No one exemplifies the “stiff upper lip” quality of British butlers quite like Downton Abbey‘s noble Charles Carson, played by four-time Best Supporting Actor Emmy nominee Jim Carter. He is, other than dear housekeeper Mrs. Hughes, the most respected and trusted of all of Downton’s staff and is very serious about not only his job but also the well-being of the Crawley family. Carson is especially sweet on eldest daughter Lady Mary, offering her advice and comfort in times of trouble. He doesn’t take particularly well to change but he does his best (the way he practices answering the telephone is particularly humorous) to please the family. And he has eyebrows even Cara Delevingne would covet.


3. Niles, The Nanny

The Sheffields’ snooty English butler, Niles (Daniel Davis), couldn’t be more different than the family’s streetwise, Queens-bred nanny, Fran, but they quickly became inseparable best friends, gossiping, snooping around, and hatching schemes to hook Fran up with Maxwell (Charles Shaughnessy). Known for his sardonic one-liners, Niles became a fan favorite during The Nanny‘s six-season run, prompting many a nasal laugh around the country. (Davis also does an impeccable British accent, despite being from Arkansas.)


4. Agador Spartacus, The Birdcage

Initially, Hank Azaria’s gay-houseboy-turned-butler was only going to be in one scene of The Birdcage, but the producers of the film decided to expand his role after cutting another character. Agador, who works for gay couple Armand (Robin Williams) and Albert (Nathan Lane) in their Miami home, has a penchant for cutoff shorts and melodramatic outbursts, and harbors an aversion to shoes (“I never wear shoes, because they make me fall down!”) and any kind of actual housework. However, he has a heart of gold; just make sure you don’t ask him to prepare the food for your next dinner party.


5. Riff Raff, The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Technically, Riff Raff (Richard O’Brien) is more of an alien masquerading as an Igor-esque assistant to Dr. Frank-N-Furter than a proper butler, but he IS the one responsible for answering the door when Brad and Janet arrive not to mention performing various menial household tasks (and likely most of the work on creating Rocky). Riff Raff and his kooky sister Magenta (Patricia Quinn) are also responsible for launching thousands of dance parties to “The Time Warp” in midnight movie theaters around the country. Not bad for two visiting aliens from the planet Transsexual in the galaxy of Transylvania.


6. Lurch, The Addams Family and Addams Family Values

He’s sort of the strong and silent type, but nevertheless, the Addams family loves their faithful butler, Lurch (played in the films by sci-fi favorite Carel Struycken). At seven-feet-tall with a serious expression on his face, he’s a fairly imposing presence, often scaring away trick-or-treaters or houseguests with just a well-timed grunt. However, we hear he’s a pretty impressive organist. We’d ask him about it, but all he says is “ughhhhhh.”


7. Edmund, Blackadder the Third

Created by Love Actually director Richard Curtis and comedy icon Rowan Atkinson for BBC One in the 1980s, the Blackadder series follows the scheming Blackadder line at various points throughout British history. The excellent, BAFTA-winning third season has Edmund Blackadder (Atkinson) in the unfortunate position of butler to the idiotic, foppish Prince Regent, George (a hysterical Hugh Laurie). However, he often finds ways of using his superior intelligence to his own advantage, and by the end of the season, Edmund Blackadder has assumed the Prince Regent’s identity after the Prince is shot and killed whilst posing in disguise as Blackadder.


8. Geoffrey Butler, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air

There’s no denying that Geoffrey (Joseph Marcell), the Banks family’s perfectly deadpan butler, secretly ruled the roost. He epitomized the bourgeois world with his elegant accent and disapproving looks, which is probably why he clashed so frequently with the charming, working-class Will. Geoffrey had a smart answer for everything, and occasionally came off as resentful of the Banks children. However he also knew how to let loose from time to time and was something of a ladies-man. He has much in common with Niles from The Nanny as they both attended Oxford and throw out snide remarks faster than you can say “In West Philadelphia born and raised…”


9. Wadsworth, Clue

Depending on which ending of Clue you watch, Tim Curry’s butler character, Wadsworth, is either the film’s hero or blackmailing villain. No matter the ending, however, Wadsworth is never short on highly quotable, snippy comebacks as he and his fellow dinner party guests try to solve Mr. Boddy’s murder without being murdered themselves. Though it was a commercial box office bomb at the time, Clue gained a cult following through home-viewing and became one of Tim Curry’s signature films. Interestingly, Tim Curry was the third choice to play Wadsworth after Leonard Rossiter (who passed away before pre-production started) and Blackadder‘s Rowan Atkinson (whom producers felt was too unknown in America at the time). Director Jonathan Lynn personally asked Curry, who he had known since they were teenagers, to step in, and to make a long story short…”TOO LATE!”


10. Benson Dubois, Soap and Benson

Celebrated character actor Robert Guillaume won two Primetime Emmys for his role as sardonic butler Benson on Soap and its spin-off series centered around his character. Much like Geoffrey on Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (on which Guillaume once guest-starred), Benson is never short on deadpanned wisecracks as he lives with and works for the melodramatic and kooky Connecticut-based Tate family. Benson is the only butler on this list to score his own TV series, where he served as the head of household affairs for a widowed Governor for seven seasons on ABC. (Fun fact: Guillaume is also the voice of Rafiki in the Disney classic, The Lion King.)

Click here to see all airings of Soap on IFC.

Neurotica_105_MPX-1920×1080

New Nasty

Whips, Chains and Hand Sanitizer

Turn On The Full Season Of Neurotica At IFC's Comedy Crib

Posted by on

Jenny Jaffe has a lot going on: She’s writing for Disney’s upcoming Big Hero 6: The Series, developing comedy projects with pals at Devastator Press, and she’s straddling the line between S&M and OCD as the creator and star of the sexyish new series Neurotica, which has just made its debut on IFC’s Comedy Crib. Jenny gave us some extremely intimate insight into what makes Neurotica (safely) sizzle…

IFC_CC_Neurotica_Series_Image4

IFC: How would you describe Neurotica to a fancy network executive you met in an elevator?

Jenny: Neurotica is about a plucky Dominatrix with OCD trying to save her small-town dungeon.

IFC: How would you describe Neurotica to a drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?

Jenny: Neurotica is about a plucky Dominatrix with OCD trying to save her small-town dungeon. You’re great. We should get coffee sometime. I’m not just saying that. I know other people just say that sometimes but I really feel like we’re going to be friends, you know? Here, what’s your number, I’ll call you so you can have my number!

IFC: What’s your comedy origin story?

Jenny: Since I was a kid I’ve dealt with severe OCD and anxiety. Comedy has always been one of the ways I’ve dealt with that. I honestly just want to help make people feel happy for a few minutes at a time.

IFC: What was the genesis of Neurotica?

Jenny: I’m pretty sure it was a title-first situation. I was coming up with ideas to pitch to a production company a million years ago (this isn’t hyperbole; I am VERY old) and just wrote down “Neurotica”; then it just sort of appeared fully formed. “Neurotica? Oh it’s an over-the-top romantic comedy about a Dominatrix with OCD, of course.” And that just happened to hit the buttons of everything I’m fascinated by.

Neurotica_series_image_1

IFC: How would you describe Ivy?

Jenny: Ivy is everything I love in a comedy character – she’s tenacious, she’s confident, she’s sweet, she’s a big wonderful weirdo.

IFC: How would Ivy’s clientele describe her?

Jenny:  Open-minded, caring, excellent aim.

IFC: Why don’t more small towns have local dungeons?

Jenny: How do you know they don’t?

IFC: What are the pros and cons of joining a chain mega dungeon?

Jenny: You can use any of their locations but you’ll always forget you have a membership and in a year you’ll be like “jeez why won’t they let me just cancel?”

IFC: Mouths are gross! Why is that?

Jenny: If you had never seen a mouth before and I was like “it’s a wet flesh cave with sharp parts that lives in your face”, it would sound like Cronenberg-ian body horror. All body parts are horrifying. I’m kind of rooting for the singularity, I’d feel way better if I was just a consciousness in a cloud.

See the whole season of Neurotica right now on IFC’s Comedy Crib.

The-Craft

The ’90s Are Back

The '90s live again during IFC's weekend marathon.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Everett Digital, Columbia Pictures

We know what you’re thinking: “Why on Earth would anyone want to reanimate the decade that gave us Haddaway, Los Del Rio, and Smash Mouth, not to mention Crystal Pepsi?”

via GIPHY

Thoughts like those are normal. After all, we tend to remember lasting psychological trauma more vividly than fleeting joy. But if you dig deep, you’ll rediscover that the ’90s gave us so much to fondly revisit. Consider the four pillars of true ’90s culture.

Boy Bands

We all pretended to hate them, but watch us come alive at a karaoke bar when “I Want It That Way” comes on. Arguably more influential than Brit Pop and Grunge put together, because hello – Justin Timberlake. He’s a legitimate cultural gem.

Man-Child Movies

Adam Sandler is just behind The Simpsons in terms of his influence on humor. Somehow his man-child schtick didn’t get old until the aughts, and his success in that arena ushered in a wave of other man-child movies from fellow ’90s comedians. RIP Chris Farley (and WTF Rob Schneider).

via GIPHY

via GIPHY

Teen Angst

In horror, dramas, comedies, and everything in between: Troubled teens! Getting into trouble! Who couldn’t relate to their First World problems, plaid flannels, and lose grasp of the internet?

Mainstream Nihilism

From the Coen Bros to Fincher to Tarantino, filmmakers on the verge of explosive popularity seemed interested in one thing: mind f*cking their audiences by putting characters in situations (and plot lines) beyond anyone’s control.

Feeling better about that walk down memory lane? Good. Enjoy the revival.

via GIPHY

And revisit some important ’90s classics all this weekend during IFC’s ’90s Marathon. Check out the full schedule here.

PL_409_MPX-1920×1080

Get Physical

DVDs are the new Vinyl

Portlandia Season 7 Now Available On Disc.

Posted by on
GIFs via Giffy

In this crazy digital age, sometimes all we really want is to reach out and touch something. Maybe that’s why so many of us are still gung-ho about owning stuff on DVD. It’s tangible. It’s real. It’s tech from a bygone era that still feels relevant, yet also kitschy and retro. It’s basically vinyl for people born after 1990.

via GIPHY

Inevitably we all have that friend whose love of the disc is so absolutely repellent that he makes the technology less appealing. “The resolution, man. The colors. You can’t get latitude like that on a download.” Go to hell, Tim.

Yes, Tim sucks, and you don’t want to be like Tim, but maybe he’s onto something and DVD is still the future. Here are some benefits that go beyond touch.

It’s Decor and Decorum

With DVDs and a handsome bookshelf you can show off your great taste in film and television without showing off your search history. Good for first dates, dinner parties, family reunions, etc.

via GIPHY

Forget Public Wifi

Warm up that optical drive. No more awkwardly streaming episodes on shady free wifi!

via GIPHY

Inter-not

Internet service goes down. It happens all the time. It could happen right now. Then what? Without a DVD on hand you’ll be forced to make eye contact with your friends and family. Or worse – conversation.

via GIPHY

Self Defense

You can’t throw a download like a ninja star. Think about it.

via GIPHY

If you’d like to experience the benefits DVD ownership yourself, Portlandia Season 7 is now available on DVD and Blue-Ray.