Ghostbusters Stay Puft

Movies That Never Sleep

10 Comedies That Perfectly Capture New York City

Catch Ghostbusters and Ghostbusters II this month on IFC.

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Photo Credit: Mary Evans/Columbia Pictures/Ronald Grant/Everett Collection

They say if you can make it in New York, you can make it anywhere. And since the early days of cinema, The Big Apple has seen all sorts of dreamers and schemers depicted on the big screen. Before you catch Ghostbusters and Ghostbusters II this month on IFC, here are ten of the best comedy films that show what it’s like to live in the city so nice, you don’t even mind being mugged leaving the packed subway train each morning.

10. The Prisoner of Second Avenue (1975)

Melvin Frank’s adaptation of Neil Simon’s play captures the “screw this city” feeling that every New Yorker eventually experiences at some point. Jack Lemmon is the perfect harried Simon protagonist, a middle-aged everyman who feels like the city has conspired against him. A fed-up Lemmon chasing a mugger (a pre-Rocky Sylvester Stallone) through the streets of Manhattan is just one in a series of classic New York moments depicted in this roller coaster ride of urban agita.


9. Desperately Seeking Susan (1985)

Madonna’s first major film role captures the grit and coolness of New York City’s East Village in the ‘80s. Through the wonders of amnesia, Rosanna Arquette’s Roberta Glass ditches her dull New Jersey life to dance in cool bars with club kids with poofy ’80s hair, wear an awesome pyramid jacket (at the now defunct East Village thrift shop Love Saves the Day ) and, of course, live The Material Girl’s life. We imagine the plot point about the classified section will be updated to Craigslist Missed Connections for the inevitable remake starring Lady Gaga.


8. Night Shift (1982)

A comedy classic for anyone who watched too much HBO back in the ’80s, Night Shift launched the feature film directing career of Ron Howard and unleashed the frantic comic energy of Michael Keaton into the world. Henry Winkler ditches The Fonz to play a bookish nighttime morgue attendant who starts an escort, er, “love broker” service with Keaton’s hyper-energetic “idea man.” With Cheers‘ resident nice gal Shelley Long playing a hooker-with-a-heart-of-gold, this is a film that could only exist during the good old seedy days of the city that never sleeps.


7. After Hours (1985)

New York City is filled with characters, many of which Martin Scorsese sheds a light on in this cult favorite dark comedy. A bored office drone (Griffin Dunne) heads to the (at the time) bohemian and sketchy neighborhood of Soho to see a girl he met at a coffee shop and encounters a series of oddballs during his late night quest to get back to his apartment. Dunne is kind of like the “Dorothy” of After Hours as he tries all night to make it back home from the whacked out “Oz” known as pre-gentrification downtown Manhattan. Sculpters, bouncers and punk rockers, Oh My!


6. Arthur (1981)

To crib a line from the film’s theme song (performed by falsetto-voiced crooner Christopher Cross): “If you get caught between the moon and New York City, the best that you can do is fall in love.” Although, it has to be easier to meet someone if you have a few hundred million or so in the bank, even if you are a drunken layabout. In this classic comedy, Dudley Moore’s spoiled man child falls in love with Linda (Liza Minnelli), a girl from Queens who he helps get away from a life of shoplifting at high-end department stores. Between the drunken laughs, there are some poignant moments between Arthur and his butler/father figure Hobson (Sir John Gielgud, in an Oscar-winning role). Arthur’s New York doesn’t include taking cabs or the subway, but he does love a nice drive through Central Park.


5. Coming To America (1988)

Where does the prince of Zamunda go when he wants to find a wife? To Queens, of course and that’s where the hilarity begins for Eddie Murphy’s Prince Akeem and his trusted servant Semmi (Arsenio Hall). Akeem falls in love with Lisa (Shari Headley) after taking a job at her father’s local fast food restaurant, McDowell’s, home of the “Big Mic.” The barbershop scenes showcase Murphy’s skills for playing multiple characters and add to the film’s vibrant NYC flavor. (Look for Samuel L. Jackson in an early role as the would-be robber who Akeem takes down with his trusty mop.)


4. Quick Change (1990)

Before Bill Murray was crashing random house parties in Williamsburg, he co-directed and starred in this underrated comedy. Donning clown make-up, Bill plays a bank robber trying to escape the city along with Geena Davis and Randy Quaid (hilarious as the dim-witted Loomis). Of course, their only real obstacle to paradise is getting stuck in the everyday quagmire and craziness of New York City and pre-gentrified Brooklyn as they attempt to make it to JFK. Along the way, they encounter a gangster (Stanley Tucci), a confused cab driver (Tony Shalhoub) and a by-the-rules bus driver played by Philip Bosco. Quick Change is a hidden gem in Murray’s filmography, and the perfect film for anyone who has had it with the big city grind.


3. When Harry Met Sally (1989)

The movie that asks and answers the question “Can men and women just be friends?,” When Harry Met Sally is also one of the great New York City romantic comedies. Making use of iconic locations like Washington Square Park and Katz’s Deli (yes, you can actually sit and eat where Meg Ryan had her “I’ll have what she’s having” moment), Rob Reiner’s comedy captures the romance of the Big Apple with its tale of two friends dancing around the inevitable over a series of encounters.


2. Annie Hall (1977)

While Manhattan has the gorgeous shots of New York City landmarks set to Gershwin music, Annie Hall is the Woody Allen classic that captures the city in all its neurotic glory. It’s fitting that the seeds for the film were planted while Allen and co-writer Marshall Brickman were walking around Manhattan — the city is as much a character as Allen’s kvetching and Diane Keaton’s trend-setting neckties. The scenes with Alvy being miserable among the shiny happy West Coast people started the LA vs. NYC debate that still rages on today. Like a lot of New Yorkers, Alvy is bound to the city that he doesn’t just love, he lurves.


1. Ghostbusters (1984)

Ghostbusters isn’t just one of the best comedies ever made. It’s also, hands down, one of the best New York City films of all time. From Venkman, Egon and Ray hunting a poltergeist in the New York Public Library, to Rick Moranis’ Louis getting cornered by a hellhound outside of Tavern on the Green, the city comes to life (literally in the sequel) whenever the Ghostbusters are on the job. You don’t get more New York than Annie Potts as Janine answering the phone with, “Ghostbusters. Whaddya want?!” Click here to see all airings of Ghostbusters on IFC.

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Inauguration Alternative

Bill Murray On Repeat

It's a movie "Murray-thon" all-day Friday on IFC.

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Photo Credit: Everett Collection, GIFs courtesy of GIPHY

Democrats, Republicans and Millennials agree: 2017 is shaping up to be a spectacle — a spectacle that really kicks into high gear this Friday with the presidential inauguration. Not only will the new POTUS swear in, but all the Country’s highest offices will be filled. It’s a daunting prospect, and to feel a little anxious about it is only normal. But if your anxiety is snowballing into panic, we have a solution:
Bill Murray.

He’s the human embodiment of a mental “Happy Place”, and there’s really no problem he can’t solve. So, with that in mind, how about we all set aside reality for a moment and let Bill take the pain away by imagining a top-shelf White House cabinet filled exclusively by his signature characters. Here are a few hypothetical appointments for your consideration…

Secretary of Defense:
Bill Murray from Stripes

His incompetence is balanced by charm, and dumb luck is inexplicably on his side. America could do worse.

Secretary of State:
Bill Murray from Lost In Translation

A seasoned globetrotter steeped in regional traditions who has the respect of the whole wide world. And he kills Costello in karaoke, which is very important.

Press Secretary:
Bill Murray from Ghostbusters

“Cats and dogs, living together. Mass hysteria.” Dude knows how to brief a room.

Secretary of Health and Human Services:
Bill Murray from What About Bob.

A doctor-approved people person who knows that progress is measured in baby steps.

Secretary of Energy:
Bill Murray from Groundhog Day

Let’s be honest, this world is going to need a lot of do-overs.

Feeling better? Hold on to that bliss. And enjoy a healthy alternative to the inauguration brouhaha with multiple Murrays all Friday long in an IFC movie marathon including Kingpin, Zombieland, Ghostbusters, and Ghostbusters II.

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Home Run

Hank Azaria Gets Thrown A Curve Ball

Brockmire Premieres April 5 at 10P

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Photo Credit: Everett Collection

Unless you’ve somehow missed every episode of the Simpsons since 1989, then surely you know that Hank Azaria is one of the most important character actors of our time. He’s so prolific and his voice is so dynamic that he’s responsible for more iconic personalities than most folks realize. Basically, he’s the great and powerful Oz — except that when you pull back the curtain the truth is actually more impressive. And now Hank is coming to IFC to bring yet another character to the TV pop culture hive mind in the new series Brockmire. Check out the trailer below.

Based on the following Funny or Die short and co-starring Amanda Peet, Brockmire follows the story of imploded major league sportscaster Jim Brockmire as he tries to resurrect his career by calling plays for a floundering minor league team in a podunk town.

The series is written by Joel Church-Cooper (Undateable) and produced by Funny or Die’s Mike Farah and Joe Farrell, meaning that there’s funny in front of the camera, funny behind the camera–funny all around. Sounds like a ball to us.

Brockmire premieres April 5 at 10P on IFC.

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Car Notes

Portlandia On People Who Can’t Park

Portlandia returns tonight at 10P on IFC.

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If flagrant bad parking takes nerve, then retaliatory note writing takes neuroses. Watch Fred and Carrie take passive aggression to next level in Car Notes, the new Portlandia web series presented by Subaru. The first episode is yours right here and now, and you can see every installment of Car Notes anytime online, on the IFC app and on demand.

Portlandia returns tonight at 10P on IFC.

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