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The Cast of That ’70s Show: Where Are They Now?

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With a clever title, and a heaping dose of nostalgia, That ’70s Show premiered on a late summer Sunday way back in 1998, in the plumb spot between The Simpsons and The X-Files. Neither animated nor full of aliens, it seemed at first blush to be just another typical sitcom. But as viewers fell in love with the residents of Point Place, Wisconsin, it became clear that it was something special. One big reason why was the quirky cast, which stood out from a television landscape ruled by the beautiful people of Friends. The only freshman show to survive Fox’s 1998 season, That ’70s Show would go on to run for 200 episodes. The youthful unknowns of the pilot would be turned into stars. Here is a look at what your favorite cast members are up to now.


Danny Masterson (Steven Hyde)

Then: Thanks to a childhood spent popping up in countless commercials, TV shows and movies, along with a run on the sitcom Cybill, Masterson was perhaps the most recognizable of the show’s teens when it premiered. As the sarcastic Hyde, he quickly became a fan favorite.

20th Century Fox Television

20th Century Fox Television

Now: Sticking around for the show’s entire run, Masterson spent the years after it went off the air focused on his work as a DJ and restaurateur. In 2012, he hopped back onto television, as a series regular on the TBS comedy Men at Work. Look for Danny on a new Netflix show called The Ranch, where he plays brothers with none other than Ashton Kutcher.

Sony Pictures Television

Sony Pictures Television


Laura Prepon (Donna Pinciotti)

Then: Prepon was best known for her work as a model and on the Internet soap opera They Go On, when she booked her part as feminist next door Donna on That ’70s Show.

20th Century Fox Television

20th Century Fox Television

Now: Following her long run on the show, Prepon bounced between movie and TV work. She played the wife of a serial killer in the movie Karla, and fronted Chelsea Handler’s NBC sitcom Are You There, Chelsea?, which lasted only one season. But that quick cancelation thankfully paved the way for her most popular role in years as Alex Vause, Piper Chapman’s drug dealing ex-girlfriend on the Netflix hit Orange is the New Black.

Lionsgate Television

Lionsgate Television


Wilmer Valderrama (Fez)

Then: Valderrama had a few small roles to his name when he was cast as sweet, horny foreign exchange student Fez.

20th Century Fox Television

20th Century Fox Television

Now: Valderrama has spent the last few years bouncing between his acting, music and charity work. He created, produced and hosted the MTV game show Yo Mamma for three seasons, and has recently been starring in the El Rey networks From Dusk Till Dawn TV series. He has recorded music as alter ego Eduardo Fresco, and recently won an ALMA award for Outstanding Social Activism.

Rodriguez International Pictures

Rodriguez International Pictures


Mila Kunis (Jackie Burkhart)

Then: Kunis was only 14 when she auditioned for the role of sassy motormouth Jackie. Knowing they couldn’t cast anyone under 18, she told them she would be 18 soon, leaving out the whole “in four years” part.

JackieThat70sShow

20th Century Fox Television

Now: Kunis is arguably the most successful That ’70s Show alum, although her husband might have something to say about that. She’s gone on to become a full-fledged movie star, starring in everything from hit comedies like Forgetting Sarah Marshall, to indie darling Black Swan, to whatever Jupiter Ascending was. And she’s done all this while voicing the role of Meg Griffin on the long running hit Family Guy. But to fans of That ’70s Show, her most popular role may be that of wife to Ashton Kutcher and mother to his child. That’s right, Jackie and Kelso got together in real life! Those crazy kids actually made it work.

Fox Searchlight

Fox Searchlight Pictures


Ashton Kutcher (Michael Kelso)

Then: A Midwest boy moonlighting as a male model, Kutcher moved to LA after booking his first audition, as loveable dope Kelso.

20th Century Fox Television

20th Century Fox Television

Now: Kutcher would prove to be the first breakout hit of the cast, starring in Dude, Where’s My Car? and The Butterfly Effect while still on the show. But not content to be just a movie and TV star, he went the full mogul route, creating and hosting MTV’s Punk’d and helping to make sideways trucker hats THE look of the mid-aughts. He has since gone on to replace Charlie Sheen on Two and a Half Men, earning a whopping $750,000 an episode. He has also founded venture capital firm A-Grade Investments, and joined co-star Danny Masterson as a restaurateur. And, as mentioned above, he’s married his longtime co-star Mila Kunis, and has a new show in the works with Danny Masterson, so he clearly loved That ’70s Show as much as you did.

Warner Bros. Television

Warner Bros. Television


Topher Grace (Eric Forman)

Then: Grace was cast as lead Eric Forman after the show’s creators saw him in a high school play. He had never acted professionally before.

20th Century Fox Television

20th Century Fox Television

Now: While Grace hasn’t had the household name status of some of his peers following That 70s Show, he’s become an in-demand character actor, co-starring in a series of big movies. He’s played everything from smart-aleck villain Venom in Spiderman 3, to smart-aleck serial killer Edwin in Predators, to smart-aleck smart-aleck Jason Morris in Valentine’s Day.

Legendary Pictures

Legendary Pictures


Debra Jo Rupp (Kitty Forman)

Then: After a long career in the theater, Rupp was cast as nervous laugher and superstar mom Kitty Forman.

20th Century Fox Television

20th Century Fox Television

Now: In the last few years, Rupp has largely returned to the stage, playing Olympia in Georges Feydeau’s 1907 farce A Flea in Her Ear at the Williamstown Theatre Festival and Dr. Ruth Westheimer in Becoming Dr. Ruth Off-Broadway, which one would imagine had its own fair share of nervous laughter.

GED Pep Talk

GED Pep Talk/YouTube


Kurtwood Smith (Reginald “Red” Forman)

Then: Smith was already a beloved character actor by the time he joined That ’70s Show as “Red” Forman, Eric’s dad who did not suffer fools well. Perhaps most famously, he played the villainous Clarence Boddicker in RoboCop, an overbearing father in Dead Poet’s Society, and three different roles in the Star Trek universe.

20th Century Fox Television

20th Century Fox Television

Now: Since the show went off the air, Smith has returned to his character actor roots. He’s played a senator on 24, a grieving father on ABC’s Resurrection and is set to star in 2016’s Amityville: The Awakening.

Disney

Disney

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Hacked In

Funny or Die Is Taking Over

FOD TV comes to IFC every Saturday night.

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We’ve been fans of Funny or Die since we first met The Landlord. That enduring love makes it more than logical, then, that IFC is totally cool with FOD hijacking the airwaves every Saturday night. Yes, that’s happening.

The appropriately titled FOD TV looks like something pulled from public access television in the nineties. Like lo-fi broken-antenna reception and warped VHS tapes. Equal parts WTF and UHF.

Get ready for characters including The Shirtless Painter, Long-Haired Businessmen, and Pigeon Man. They’re aptly named, but for a better sense of what’s in store, here’s a taste of ASMR with Kelly Whispers:

Watch FOD TV every Saturday night during IFC’s regularly scheduled movies.

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Wicked Good

See More Evil

Stan Against Evil Season 1 is on Hulu.

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Okay, so you missed the entire first season of Stan Against Evil. There’s no shame in that, per se. But here’s the thing: Season 2 is just around the corner and you don’t want to lag behind. After all, Season 1 had some critical character development, not to mention countless plot twists, and a breathless finale cliffhanger that’s been begging for resolution since last fall. It also had this:

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The good news is that you can catch up right now on Hulu. Phew. But if you aren’t streaming yet, here’s a basic primer…

Willards Mill Is Evil

Stan spent his whole career as sheriff oblivious to the fact that his town has a nasty curse. Mostly because his recently-deceased wife was secretly killing demons and keeping Stan alive.

Demons Really Want To Kill Stan

The curse on Willards Mill stipulates that damned souls must hunt and kill each and every town sheriff, or “constable.” Oh, and these demons are shockingly creative.

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They Also Want To Kill Evie

Why? Because Evie’s a sheriff too, and the curse on Willard’s Mill doesn’t have a “one at a time” clause. Bummer, Evie.

Stan and Evie Must Work Together

Beating the curse will take two, baby, but that’s easier said than done because Stan doesn’t always seem to give a damn. Damn!

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Beware of Goats

It goes without saying for anyone who’s seen the show: If you know that ancient evil wants to kill you, be wary of anything that has cloven feet.

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Season 2 Is Lurking

Scary new things are slouching towards Willards Mill. An impending darkness descending on Stan, Evie and their cohort – eviler evil, more demony demons, and whatnot. And if Stan wants to survive, he’ll have to get even Stanlier.

Stan Against Evil Season 1 is now streaming right now on Hulu.

IFC_ComedyCrib_ThePlaceWeLive_SeriesImage_web

SO EXCITED!!!

Reminders that the ’90s were a thing

"The Place We Live" is available for a Jessie Spano-level binge on Comedy Crib.

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Unless you stopped paying attention to the world at large in 1989, you are of course aware that the ’90s are having their pop cultural second coming. Nobody is more acutely aware of this than Dara Katz and Betsy Kenney, two comedians who met doing improv comedy and have just made their Comedy Crib debut with the hilarious ’90s TV throwback series, The Place We Live.

IFC: How would you describe “The Place We Live” to a fancy network executive you just met in an elevator?

Dara: It’s everything you loved–or loved to hate—from Melrose Place and 90210 but condensed to five minutes, funny (on purpose) and totally absurd.

IFC: How would you describe “The Place We Live” to a drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?

Betsy: “Hey Todd, why don’t you have a sip of water. Also, I think you’ll love The Place We Live because everyone has issues…just like you, Todd.”

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IFC: When you were living through the ’90s, did you think it was television’s golden age or the pop culture apocalypse?


Betsy: I wasn’t sure I knew what it was, I just knew I loved it!


Dara: Same. Was just happy that my parents let me watch. But looking back, the ’90s honored The Teen. And for that, it’s the golden age of pop culture. 

IFC: Which ’90s shows did you mine for the series, and why?

Betsy: Melrose and 90210 for the most part. If you watch an episode of either of those shows you’ll see they’re a comedic gold mine. In one single episode, they cover serious crimes, drug problems, sex and working in a law firm and/or gallery, all while being young, hot and skinny.


Dara: And almost any series we were watching in the ’90s, Full House, Saved By the Bell, My So Called Life has very similar themes, archetypes and really stupid-intense drama. We took from a lot of places. 

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IFC: How would you describe each of the show’s characters in terms of their ’90s TV stereotype?

Dara: Autumn (Sunita Mani) is the femme fatale. Robin (Dara Katz) is the book worm (because she wears glasses). Candace (Betsy Kenney) is Corey’s twin and gives great advice and has really great hair. Corey (Casey Jost) is the boy next door/popular guy. Candace and Corey’s parents decided to live in a car so the gang can live in their house. 
Lee (Jonathan Braylock) is the jock.

IFC: Why do you think the world is ready for this series?

Dara: Because everyone’s feeling major ’90s nostalgia right now, and this is that, on steroids while also being a totally new, silly thing.

Delight in the whole season of The Place We Live right now on IFC’s Comedy Crib. It’ll take you back in all the right ways.