Roman Coppola on “A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III,” Bill Murray and wanting to work with Kristen Stewart


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IFC: Maybe he just draws it to him. One of my favorite moments of the movie was when you had the actors and crew recite their names at the end instead of having end credits. Why did you decide to do that, and how many times did you have to film it?

RC: I remember writing that as I was doing the script, like, “Oh, what would be a unique way to end the picture that would be in the spirit of what the movie kind of represents?” To me it’s kind of a collective of people coming together and making this. It felt kind of like a play, and a curtain call is very common in the theater — not that this is particularly theatre-like, my movie, but it’s kind of familiar. In fact I met someone who was like, “Every movie should have an end sequence like that,” and I thought, “Oh, that would be kind of cool, as it is in the theater.”

There’s a movie called “Candy” that inspired it. This movie is by Christian Marquand in which at the end of the film you see all the characters sort of some together out of the context of the story but just sort of as the actors. That inspired the idea and it was sort of a thank you and a way to acknowledge my crew and the whole team of people. I like the notion. It was a little sentiment to me that maybe only I care about but, in the story, these two characters Charlie and Ivana will probably never see each other again. It’s clearly over, and yet Charlie Sheen as an actor and Katheryn Winnick as an actress kind of came together as friends and meeting one another in the context of the movie, and I thought there was something kind of charming about they say farewell to each other but in the end they’re kind of holding hands, together again. It was a neat notion to me to acknowledge that there’s a new relationship that was born out of this. That meant something to me.

In terms of how many takes, we left ourselves plenty of time because it was a pretty ambitious shot and there was the sunset. I actually got a really great take which is the one we used, but I kept shooting a few more because the light kept going down deeper and deeper into the sunset. But I think ultimately we did like 23 takes and I probably used take 16 or something like that.

IFC: I know it might be a strange thing to pick out but it was strangely personal. Usually the end credits are so impersonal, I just thought it was an interesting way of bringing the cast and crew to the audience.

RC: Yeah. It means a lot to me because my little daughter’s in there and my longtime girlfriend and my crew. All the people who came together to help me out got to sort of take a bow, so to me it is rather personal. I’m glad you see it that way.

IFC: We’re huge fans of Bill Murray here at IFC and I know you mentioned you’ve worked with him many times and know him personally. How does the man compare to the legend?

RC: He is a titan, meaning he is larger than life. He is not just a regular human. He’s tall. He has such presence. He comes in the room and he just sweeps everyone up in his charisma and his spell. He’s just a one-of-a-kind, larger-than-life guy. I’ve gotten to know him and also privileged to hang out and see him and stuff, but he definitely evokes a feeling of awe. I’m just going to gush, but he obviously is a person to be around. He’s so incredibly funny and witty and he’s very generous and warm. All the things you would hope for, he is.

IFC: You’ve worked with and known a lot of great filmmakers. Are there any who you think inspired this film the most?

RC: I would say that there’s a few. Movies are very, what’s the word… they can be anything. It’s really magic. There’s certain filmmakers that have shown me, as I see their movies, I think, “Wow, a movie can really be anything or take you anywhere and evoke all sorts of feelings and spark your senses.” So movies that my film kind of aspires to that use sort of that freedom is a movie like “Stardust Memories” or “Annie Hall,” which are of course Woody Allen movies. He’s obviously one of the greats, we all know that. If you look at “Annie Hall” and you look at all the places it goes, it’s really staggering. It’s really just so free, so that really inspired me.

I love Bob Fosse in particular. “All That Jazz” is a movie that I always could just watch again and again, and it similarly has certain fractured narrative and use of fantasy and feeling rather free. I think both those filmmakers owe a debt to [Federico] Fellini. [He] is one of those master filmmakers who is particularly in touch with a sense of fancy and flights of fancy and fantasy and feeling that freedom, that malleability that film can sort of take you anywhere. So a film like “8 1/2″ is something that really, deeply impressed me and kind of relates to things I’ve done, so those are the things that come to mind from more a sense of structure and sense of mis-en-scene.

IFC: “The Bling Ring,” which you produce, seems to continue Sophia Coppola’s trend of exploring fame and celebrity and the obsession with it. As a member of the Hollywood elite looking out, what do you think of that topic?

RC: That’s really a great question for Sophia to answer. She works in a very intuitive way so this is more of a concept, talking about that. I think it’s sort of the job of the viewer or the job of the critical world to consider, analyze and discuss themes or ideas. But just working with her, she gets something in her head and is like, “Ah, there’s something I like about this,” or, “Something is interesting about this,” and it’s very rare and frankly like never that it’s a discussion about concept. Like, “Oh, this is a story of our time.” But artists that are sensitive; art is like a membrane that sort of picks those things up, so I think it’s very reasonable to say that it’s a reflection of our sort of celebrity-obsessed culture and sort of a comment on it, certainly. I guess the distinction I’m trying to make is that’s not really the intention.

It’s a world that interests her and I think many people are fascinated by celebrity and we can all be above it, like, “Oh, I don’t really care,” but then you read something on TMZ and you want to read it, and People magazine, you see it on the airplane and you read it cover to cover. It’s just everyone seems to have this curiosity about fame. I don’t think it’s anything new. It’s certainly always been the case that there are those noted people that seem to kind of represent ideas. There’s the good guys, the bad guys, the villains, and you just sort of read into it. Anyways, I’m going sideways, but it’s actually playing very soon in Cannes and has an opening night slot so the world will get a chance to check out soon.

IFC: Lastly, I’m just curious if you have anything in the works right now that you plan to direct or write or produce?

RC: You know, I don’t really know. I don’t have an exciting answer for you. It took a lot of time and process to make this movie. It was very much a handmade movie in that I was very involved with all the phases and I did it with a lot of sweat and help from people that are close to me and so I’m kind of sort of taking a little breather. I’m expecting a baby soon and will enjoy that. Anyway, longwinded answer but I don’t really know. I’m kind of in that state of mind where you start to look around and you read something in the newspaper and you’re like, “Oh, is that a story kernel?” I’m in that state of receptive curiosity of something that will maybe pop into my mind soon.

IFC: Is there anyone specific that you’d like to work with going forward?

RC: I met Kristen Stewart not long ago because I was involved with “On the Road” and I found her to be so charming and interesting. That is someone I admire. Johnny Depp is such a talented person. I could just go on and on. But I don’t have any plans or designs. I’m just like everyone else; there’s these people that of course you’d like to work with.

Watch an exclusive bonus clip from “A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III” below!

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What did you think of “A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III”? Did you like the casting of Charlie Sheen? Tell us in the comments section below or on Facebook and Twitter.

That 70s Show James Franco

That '70s Franco

Watch James Franco’s Geriatric That ’70s Show Spoof

Catch That '70s Show Mondays & Tuesdays 6-11P on IFC.

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Ever wonder if Jackie, Kelso, Fez, Donna, Hyde, and Eric ever made it out of Red‘s basement? According to James Franco, those dumbasses definitely did not.

In a new episode of AOL’s “Making a Scene with James Franco,” the actor peered into the future of the gang from That ’70s Show to see what they’d be up to if the show actually continued into their 70s. Turns out they’re still sitting around the basement, sharing a joint, and listening to some of the Steve Miller Band’s greatest hits.

In the sketch, aptly called “That 70s ’70s Show,” Franco plays both a stoned, elderly Kelso as well as a nostril-hair heavy Eric Forman. The only member of the crew who has made it out of the basement is Donna, who has sadly passed away into a higher plane of existence (yes, it’s possible for them to get higher) leaving Eric to mourn the loss of his one true love.

For more That ’70s Show, find out who almost played Red Forman and more fun facts.

That 70s show

Must Scream TV

10 Spooktacular Halloween TV Episodes

Catch That '70s Show Mondays and Tuesdays 6-11P on IFC.

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A great Halloween episode is like terrific fan fiction. Our beloved characters are thrust into a spooky predicament beyond their normal scope of storylines while wearing garish outfits and fearing for their lives. The annual tradition on-screen is a reflection of the holiday’s appeal in real life: A chance to see the familiar skew towards the garish and macabre.

Fun, scary, and memorable, here are the 10 best Halloween episodes of all time.

10. That ’70s Show, “Halloween”

that 70s halloween

The siren song of an abandoned building on Halloween lures the That ’70s Show gang to their burned-out grammar school where they discover their old permanent records. Secrets and backstories are revealed, such as Jackie’s middle name, Kelso’s real age, and an act of vandalism committed by a 7-year-old Eric which followed Hyde around his entire life.

9. Freaks and Geeks, “Tricks and Treats”

freaks and geeks

freaks and geeks halloween

Expertly capturing the dilemma of kids too old to trick-or-treat but too young for drunken holiday revelry (legally, at least), Freaks and Geeks brings us back to the youthful pursuit of making the most out of Halloween. Wannabe freak Lindsay opts for petty vandalism while Sam and his geeky pals are humiliated by their costumed rounds through the neighborhood. On the plus side, Bill makes a very stately Bionic Woman.

8. Quantum Leap, “The Boogieman”

Quantum leap goat
Leaping into a horror writer’s life in 1964, Sam plays detective as the people around him start dying, Al’s not quite himself, and a goat keeps appearing. The grisly plot culminates to a legitimately unsettling climax that’s as scary as it is funny (seriously, it’s hard to describe) and we find out the neighborhood boy goes on to become somebody very familiar.

7. Cheers, “Bar Wars V: The Final Judgement”



On Halloween, the bar’s longtime rivalry with Gary’s Olde Towne Tavern is curiously called off when Gary reveals his heart can’t take it — literally. But Sam, not buying the medical diagnosis, stages an elaborate (and in reality, logistically impossible) prank involving Carla’s holographic head that may have caused Gary to kick the bucket. (There’s a humorous callback to this episode in the following season’s “Bar Wars” episode.)

6. Amazing Stories, “Mummy Daddy”

Over a decade before Wes Craven upended horror movie tropes with Scream, this episode of the tragically short-lived Steven Spielberg-produced anthology series blurs the line between myth and Hollywood when an actor playing a mummy is pursued by (and mistaken for) an actual mummy. Pure pulp fun if only for the image of a mummy riding horseback.

5. Buffy the Vampire Slayer, “Fear, Itself”

Buffy halloween
Mixing a little Scarecrow villainry into the Whedonverse, this episode has Buffy and the gang attending a Halloween frat party where a demon that feeds on fear subjects everyone to their greatest nightmares. A delightful writing exercise that exposes each character’s weaknesses and doubts, “Fear, Itself” is prime Buffy entertainment.

4. MacGyver, “Halloween Knights”

CBS Television

CBS Television/ABC

Less of an episode of television than a convergence of all things great, MacGyver is coerced into joining forces with longtime nemesis and super-assassin Murdoc when his former hitman employers kidnap his sister and threaten to execute her at a posh Halloween party. Complete with a booby-trapped funhouse and thinly veiled references to Raiders of the Lost Ark, this is hands down one of the greatest episodes from the series.

3. Roseanne, “BOO!”

Roseanne halloween

Kicking off an annual tradition of Halloween with the Conners, “BOO!” from season two of Roseanne showcases the family’s obsession with the holiday and the lengths to which they celebrate it. For a family just scraping by and the viewers who watch them, it’s a cathartic outlet and an excuse to let freak flags fly. And from the first holiday go-around, it’s instantly clear the show will do it again and again.

2. It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia“Who Got Dee Pregnant?”



Narrowly edging out season eight’s stellar, McPoyle-infested “Maureen Ponderosa Wedding Massacre,” season six’s “Who Got Dee Pregnant?” represents the very best of the Paddy’s Pub crew. Dee reveals she’s pregnant and the gang engage in drunken flashbacks Rashomon-style to determine who the father could be. Featuring the sexual exploits of the always-awesome Artemis, as well as Frank dressed as the canon-busting Man-Spider, “Who Got Dee Pregnant?” is top-notch.

1. The Simpsons“Treehouse of Horror V”

Simpsons Shining

Picking your favorite child would be far easier than picking your favorite Simpsons Halloween special — though they tend to be earlier seasons, don’t they? However, “Treehouse of Horror V” from season six is simply too fantastic to be topped. Between the classic Shining parody, Homer’s time-traveling advice from his father on his wedding night, and Groundskeeper Willie constantly getting an axe in the back, you can’t find a better way to ring in October 31st than this half hour.

Missed Comedy Bang! Bang!’s Rocky Horror-tastic Halloween blowout? Watch it now.

Zoolander 2

Blue Steel Is Back

Watch the Ridiculously Funny Zoolander 2 Trailer

Portlandia returns January 21st at 10P ET/PT.

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Photo Credit: Red Hour Productions/YouTube

The Zoolander 2 trailer is finally here, and it appears that someone is trying to kill the world’s most beautiful people. (Even Justin Bieber isn’t safe!)

The film has a lot of familiar, hilarious faces like Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson, and Will Ferrell, but the trailer also features a ton of new additions including a nearly unrecognizable Kristen Wiig, Kyle Mooney, Penelope Cruz, Fred Armisen, and Benedict Cumberbatch (but not his eyebrows).

While the Portlandia and Documentary Now! star isn’t in the new trailer, Fred has the Instagram shots to prove that he was on the set. When he was heading to Rome, where the highly anticipated (and very good looking) sequel was filmed, Fred also proved that he is very good at packing a bag. The how-to video was so impressive that Ben Stiller had no choice but to repost the announcement with the caption: “Excited @sordociego (Fred Armisen!!) is joining the #zoolander2 cast!”

Excited @sordociego (Fred Armisen!!) is joining the #zoolander2 cast!

A video posted by Derek Zoolander (@zoolander) on

As Fred told Conan O’Brien, he had a lot of fun working on the film and touring the sites of Rome with his selfie stick. Be sure to check back for more updates about Fred’s role in Zoolander 2 and the sixth season of Portlandia, which premieres January 21st at 10P ET/PT on IFC


Lorne Visits the Cat Ranch

Lorne Michaels Finally Talks to Marc Maron on WTF

Maron returns to IFC in 2016.

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A historic summit of comedic minds has finally happened in the Cat Ranch — Lorne Michaels sat down for an interview on Marc Maron‘s WTF Podcast. And you can listen to it here.


20 years ago, Marc had a meeting with Lorne about possibly taking over Weekend Update on Saturday Night Live. But then Marc never got a a callback—and his brief meeting with the SNL guru has haunted him ever since. This week on his WTF podcast, Marc finally got closure. As Marc wrote on his website, “In the history of WTF, Lorne Michaels is talked about more than any other person. Now he is finally a guest.”

In addition to discussing why Marc wasn’t ready to join the Not Ready for Primetime Players, the episode’s wide-ranging conversation also covers the reason Michaels started the show back in 1975 and what keeps him doing it each and every season.

Listen to WTF on iTunes or download from the WTF podcast website. And be sure to check IFC.com for more updates on Marc and season 4 of his comedy series Maron, which returns to IFC spring 2016.

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