DID YOU READ

10 ironic comedy remakes

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This is the era of revamping other eras. That is, the ideas of yore are being mined constantly for the potential to become blockbuster movie franchises to fuel sequel after sequel, and it usually works. In some cases, the best way to make it work is to take something old, strip away the cheesier elements and turn it into something cool and badass. However, in some cases – a prime example being Tim Burton’s satirical take on the goth-soap drama “Dark Shadows” – the cheese is too irresistible, and the remakers instead opt to celebrate those elements with sarcasm, loving mockery and ironic flair. Let’s take a look at ten of these particular efforts.


1. “21 Jump Street” (2012)

One of the more recent efforts in this style seems to be the most well received, as the dramatic teen-heartthrob vehicle from the late ‘80s about young-looking rookie cops being assigned to undercover duty in a local high school gets a raucous send-up that does nothing but mock itself as well as the entire concept of remaking old stuff. Even some of its original cast shows up to do the same thing, but it’s really the Channing Tatum/Jonah Hill show, as their clueless characters stumble into ridiculous situations which play out to a surprisingly hilarious effect, proving that a man named Channing has to develop a sense of humor somewhere along the way.


2. “The Green Hornet” (2011)

After this property bounced around Hollywood for years and went through the obligatory rejected Kevin Smith pitch, Michel Gondry and Seth Rogen finally took a crack at relaunching the movie serial superhero that was turned into a TV series featuring Bruce Lee back in the 1960s. Although he brought Jay Chou in as the competent sidekick Kato, Rogen himself played crusading reporter Britt Reid as more of a bumbling party guy who suddenly had to grow up, but not fast enough to keep himself from looking like an idiot in this new endeavor. Poking fun at superhero movie conventions, Kato agrees to become a masked vigilante, but refuses tights. It didn’t go over quite as well.


3. “Starsky & Hutch” (2004)

A beloved 1970s cop show became a winking buddy cop movie in 2004 for Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson, and you know those guys couldn’t take something like this all that seriously. If their mockery of old school car-chase-heavy action-dramas doesn’t get you, perhaps Snoop Dogg co-starring as their slick pal Huggy Bear, Will Ferrell’s perverted prison informant and Vince Vaughn as the ridiculously-moustachioed bad guy will. There’s even some Jason Bateman action to enjoy.


4. “The Brady Bunch Movie” (1995)

In 1995, this riff on the cheery ‘70s sitcom about a guy with three boys marrying a woman with three girls took the self-referential parody to heights it hadn’t reached before, taking the family directly out of the 1970s and throwing them into the too-hip-for-the-room 1990s world. Complete with outdated musical numbers while gallivanting through a Sears. Gary Cole and Shelley Long are the Brady elders, and Ben Stiller’s wife Christine Taylor looks so eerily like the original Marcia Brady Maureen McCormick that it’s been difficult to see her in any other role at all.


5. “Dragnet” (1987)

The long-running no-nonsense police drama starring Jack Webb was brought to comic life in 1987 by Dan Aykroyd doing a pitch-perfect monotone riff on Webb’s stuffy persona, playing his character’s nephew Joe Friday. Tom Hanks, back when he was still known entirely for comedy, was his modern partner Pep Streebek. While the film remains funny and charming, complete with the incomparable Dabney Coleman as a smut king and Christopher Plummeras the villain, one has to wonder about the level of self-awareness. Sure, they were obviously having fun with the concept, but somehow, they thought it was a good idea to rope Aykroyd and Hanks into rapping. Yes, in case you forgot, here is their Dragnet rap “City of Crime.” Watch it and wonder just how aware of themselves they actually were.

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Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

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He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

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On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

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Draught Pick

Sam Adams “Keeps It Brockmire”

All New Brockmire airs Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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From baseball to beer, Jim Brockmire calls ’em like he sees ’em.

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It’s no wonder at all, then, that Sam Adams would reach out to Brockmire to be their shockingly-honest (and inevitably short-term) new spokesperson. Unscripted and unrestrained, he’ll talk straight about Sam—and we’ll take his word. Check out this new testimonial for proof:

See more Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC, presented by Samuel Adams. Good f***** beer.

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