DID YOU READ

10 actors turned directors

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“What I really want to do is direct.” Once upon a time, that was a line used to mock the unbridled chutzpah of actors who wanted to helm films of their own, but now, no one’s really laughing at the notion that the pretty people in front of the camera might also possess the talent to handle the responsibilities behind the camera as well. Too many Academy Awards have been won by these thespi-auteurs. Need proof? Here’s a quick rundown of ten actors, in no particular order, who turned director and made good with the switch.



1. Clint Eastwood

Sure, let’s start with the big dog. That oddball performance at the Republican National Convention notwithstanding, and contrary to “The Fall Guy” Colt Seevers’ assertion that he’s responsible for the finery of Clint’s looks, Eastwood blazed a trail to stardom in the classic spaghetti westerns of Sergio Leone, the mean streets of Dirty Harry’s San Francisco and in army pictures like “Kelly’s Heroes.” He started directing in 1971 with “Play Misty For Me,” he directed himself in classics like “The Outlaw Josey Wales” and “High Plains Drifter,” and in 1992, he was the Best Director of the Best Picture of the Year with “Unforgiven,” the dark revisiting of the western genre that made him famous. Since then, he’s directed gems like “A Perfect World” and returned to the Oscar stage with “Mystic River,” and returned to the winner’s circle with “Million Dollar Baby.” The kicker is that, for both of his Best Picture and Best Director wins, he was also nominated for Best Actor, but didn’t pull off the trifecta. That doesn’t matter, though. This is Clint Eastwood.



2. Mel Gibson

After that glowing tribute, the time comes to jump to this beleaguered fellow. Once, there was a time when Mel Gibson was just awesome. He was articulate and hilarious, Mad Max and a Lethal Weapon, a quipmaster who could match wits with Robert Downey Jr. in “Air America” and a guy you believed could charm the knickers off of Jodie Foster in “Maverick.” His directorial debut was 1993’s “Man Without a Face,” but he leapt into the stratosphere with 1995’s “Braveheart,” which became the Best Picture of the Year. It may have played fast and loose with the facts about the life of William Wallace, but it was quite the engrossing movie, landing him the Best Director award as well, although he wasn’t nominated in the acting category. He then transitioned from his successful on-camera work to following his passion – in this case, the “hey, let’s all beat up Jesus in slow motion” film called “The Passion of the Christ.” Things… well, they started to go downhill from there – maybe even a little “Apocalypto,” so to speak. Do you really need a recap of that, sugar tits?



3. Jodie Foster

Speaking of Gibson, one of his few defenders after it became clear that he was kind of nuts was his “Maverick” co-star Foster. As we saw at the Golden Globes, it turns out she might be a smidge damaged as well, as you might expect from someone who began acting at age three, and who was nominated for Best Supporting Actress as a 13-year-old prostitute in “Taxi Driver,” AND who was cited as the motivation for why a guy tried to assassinate the president when she was 19. Things like that gotta mess a woman up a bit. Add to that winning Best Actor awards for a profoundly disturbing graphic rape drama like “The Accused” and the enduringly creepy “The Silence of the Lambs,” and it seemed that the ugly underbelly of humanity is what she thrived on exploring. Perhaps that’s why her feature film directorial debut was with 1991’s “Little Man Tate,” a quiet story about a mother trying to raise her smart but socially-disabled son. Then, a few years later, she followed it up with the ensemble family dysfunction dramedy “Home For The Holidays.” That was it for her in the director’s chair, though, until 2011’s “The Beaver,” starring Gibson as a man having a mental breakdown centered around a hand puppet. For some reason. Perhaps it’s best not to speculate.



4. Robert Redford

Here we go. The erstwhile founder of the Sundance Film Festival made his bones early in his career as a blond, handsome leading man opposite notables such as Natalie Wood and Jane Fonda in “Inside Daisy Clover” and “The Chase,” respectively. He broke out of that mold with the legendary film “Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid” with Paul Newman. He’d re-team with Newman and get an Oscar nomination out of 1973’s “The Sting,” becoming one of the biggest stars in the world. His first time in the director’s chair came with 1980’s dark family drama “Ordinary People,” and he knocked it out of the park, winning Best Director and Best Picture. He’s continued to produce stellar work behind the camera, with “The Milagro Beanfield War,” “A River Runs Through It” and “Quiz Show.” We’ll just quietly ignore The Fresh Prince Magic Golf Movie.



5. Bobcat Goldthwait

Wait, what? Yes, that “Police Academy” guy who screamed a lot in “One Crazy Summer” dropped that yelling stand-up schtick completely and started making black comedies that explore weird areas that no one else touches. Starting in 1991 with the alcoholic clown cult classic “Shakes The Clown,” and continuing with a pair of Sundance Film Festival entries – 2006’s “Sleeping Dogs Lie” (about a woman hiding the disturbing secret that she once fellated her dog on a whim) and 2009’s “World’s Greatest Dad” (starring Robin Williams as a father who covers up his son’s autoerotic asphyxiation death and writes a best-selling suicide note), he’s managed to tackle these strange subjects that could be broad comedies with a deft dramatic touch and realism. The 2011 Toronto Film Festival entrant “God Bless America” tells the story of a doomed, depressed man who starts a “Bonnie and Clyde” style killing spree against everything that sucks about America with an awful reality-show star. It’s a unique road Bobcat is paving, not for the easily-offended, but it’s a road worth traveling.

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Holiday Extra Special

Make The Holidays ’80s Again

Enjoy the holiday cheer Wednesday December 21 at 10P on IFC.

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Photo Credit: Everett Collection

Whatever happened to the kind of crazy-yet-cozy holiday specials that blanketed the early winter airwaves of the 1980s? Unceremoniously killed by infectious ’90s jadedness? Slow fade out at the hands of early-onset millennial ennui? Whatever the reason, nixing the tradition was a huge mistake.

A huge mistake that we’re about to fix.

Announcing IFC’s Joe’s Pub Presents: A Holiday Special, starring Tony Hale. It’s a celeb-studded extravaganza in the glorious tradition of yesteryear featuring Bridget Everett, Jo Firestone, Nick Thune, Jen Kirkman, house band The Dap-Kings, and many more. And it’s at Joe’s Pub, everyone’s favorite home away from home in the Big Apple.

The yuletide cheer explodes Wednesday December 21 at 10P. But if you were born after 1989 and have no idea what void this spectacular special is going to fill, sample from this vintage selection of holiday hits:

Andy Williams and The NBC Kids Search For Santa

The quintessential holiday special. Get snuggly and turn off your brain. You won’t need it.

A Muppet Family Christmas

The Fraggles. The Muppets. The Sesame Street gang. Fate. The Jim Henson multiverse merges in this warm and fuzzy Holiday gathering.

Julie Andrews: The Sound Of Christmas

To this day a foolproof antidote to holiday cynicism. It’s cheesy, but a good cheese. In this case an Alpine Gruyère.

Star Wars Holiday Special

Okay, busted. This one was released in 1978. Still totally ’80s though. And yes that’s Bea Arthur.

Pee Wee’s Playhouse Christmas Special

Pass the eggnog, and make sure it’s loaded. This special is everything you’d expect it to be and much, much more.

Joe’s Pub Presents: A Holiday Special premieres Wednesday December 21 at 10P on IFC.

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It Ain't Over Yet

A Guide to Coping with the End of Comedy Bang! Bang!

Watch the final episodes tonight at 11 and 11:30P on IFC.

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After five seasons and 110 halved-hour episodes, Scott Aukerman’s hipster comedy opus, Comedy Bang! Bang!, has come to an end. Fridays at 11 and 11:30P will never be the same. We know it can be hard for fans to adjust after the series finale of their favorite TV show. That’s why we’ve prepared this step-by-step guide to managing your grief.

Step One: Cry it out

It’s just natural. We’re sad too.
Scott crying GIF

Step Two: Read the CB!B! IMDB Trivia Page

The show is over and it feels like you’ve lost a friend. But how well did you really know this friend? Head over to Comedy Bang! Bang!’s IMDB page to find out some things you may not have known…like that it’s “based on a Civil War battle of the same name” or that “Reggie Watts was actually born with the name Theodore Leopold The Third.”

Step Three: Listen to the podcast

One fascinating piece of CB!B! trivia that you might not learn from IMDB is that there’s a podcast that shares the same name as the TV show. It’s even hosted by Scott Aukerman! It’s not exactly like watching the TV show on a Friday night, but that’s only because each episode is released Monday morning. If you close your eyes, the podcast is just like watching the show with your eyes closed!

Step Four: Watch brand new CB!B! clips?!

The best way to cope with the end of Comedy Bang! Bang! is to completely ignore that it’s over — because it’s not. In an unprecedented move, IFC is opening up the bonus CB!B! content vault. There are four brand new, never-before-seen sketches featuring Scott Aukerman, Kid Cudi, and “Weird Al” Yankovic ready for you to view on the IFC App. There’s also one right here, below this paragraph! Watch all four b-b-bonus clips and feel better.

Binge the entire final season, plus exclusive sketches, right now on the IFC app.

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Everybody Sweats Now

The Four-Day Sweatsgiving Weekend On IFC

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This long holiday weekend is your time to gobble gobble gobble and give heartfelt thanks—thanks for the comfort and forgiveness of sweatpants. Because when it comes right down to it, there’s nothing more wholesome and American than stuffing yourself stupid and spending endless hours in front of the TV in your softest of softests.

So get the sweats, grab the remote and join IFC for four perfect days of entertainment.

sweatsgiving
It all starts with a 24-hour T-day marathon of Rocky Horror Picture Show, then continues Friday with an all-day binge of Stan Against Evil.

By Saturday, the couch will have molded to your shape. Which is good, because you’ll be nestled in for back-to-back Die Hard and Lethal Weapon.

Finally, come Sunday it’s time to put the sweat back in your sweatpants with The Shining, The Exorcist, The Chronicles of Riddick, Terminator 2, and Blade: Trinity. They totally count as cardio.

As if you need more convincing, here’s Martha Wash and the IFC&C Music Factory to hammer the point home.

The Sweatsgiving Weekend starts Thursday on IFC

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