DID YOU READ

10 actors turned directors

bobcat

Posted by on

“What I really want to do is direct.” Once upon a time, that was a line used to mock the unbridled chutzpah of actors who wanted to helm films of their own, but now, no one’s really laughing at the notion that the pretty people in front of the camera might also possess the talent to handle the responsibilities behind the camera as well. Too many Academy Awards have been won by these thespi-auteurs. Need proof? Here’s a quick rundown of ten actors, in no particular order, who turned director and made good with the switch.



1. Clint Eastwood

Sure, let’s start with the big dog. That oddball performance at the Republican National Convention notwithstanding, and contrary to “The Fall Guy” Colt Seevers’ assertion that he’s responsible for the finery of Clint’s looks, Eastwood blazed a trail to stardom in the classic spaghetti westerns of Sergio Leone, the mean streets of Dirty Harry’s San Francisco and in army pictures like “Kelly’s Heroes.” He started directing in 1971 with “Play Misty For Me,” he directed himself in classics like “The Outlaw Josey Wales” and “High Plains Drifter,” and in 1992, he was the Best Director of the Best Picture of the Year with “Unforgiven,” the dark revisiting of the western genre that made him famous. Since then, he’s directed gems like “A Perfect World” and returned to the Oscar stage with “Mystic River,” and returned to the winner’s circle with “Million Dollar Baby.” The kicker is that, for both of his Best Picture and Best Director wins, he was also nominated for Best Actor, but didn’t pull off the trifecta. That doesn’t matter, though. This is Clint Eastwood.



2. Mel Gibson

After that glowing tribute, the time comes to jump to this beleaguered fellow. Once, there was a time when Mel Gibson was just awesome. He was articulate and hilarious, Mad Max and a Lethal Weapon, a quipmaster who could match wits with Robert Downey Jr. in “Air America” and a guy you believed could charm the knickers off of Jodie Foster in “Maverick.” His directorial debut was 1993’s “Man Without a Face,” but he leapt into the stratosphere with 1995’s “Braveheart,” which became the Best Picture of the Year. It may have played fast and loose with the facts about the life of William Wallace, but it was quite the engrossing movie, landing him the Best Director award as well, although he wasn’t nominated in the acting category. He then transitioned from his successful on-camera work to following his passion – in this case, the “hey, let’s all beat up Jesus in slow motion” film called “The Passion of the Christ.” Things… well, they started to go downhill from there – maybe even a little “Apocalypto,” so to speak. Do you really need a recap of that, sugar tits?



3. Jodie Foster

Speaking of Gibson, one of his few defenders after it became clear that he was kind of nuts was his “Maverick” co-star Foster. As we saw at the Golden Globes, it turns out she might be a smidge damaged as well, as you might expect from someone who began acting at age three, and who was nominated for Best Supporting Actress as a 13-year-old prostitute in “Taxi Driver,” AND who was cited as the motivation for why a guy tried to assassinate the president when she was 19. Things like that gotta mess a woman up a bit. Add to that winning Best Actor awards for a profoundly disturbing graphic rape drama like “The Accused” and the enduringly creepy “The Silence of the Lambs,” and it seemed that the ugly underbelly of humanity is what she thrived on exploring. Perhaps that’s why her feature film directorial debut was with 1991’s “Little Man Tate,” a quiet story about a mother trying to raise her smart but socially-disabled son. Then, a few years later, she followed it up with the ensemble family dysfunction dramedy “Home For The Holidays.” That was it for her in the director’s chair, though, until 2011’s “The Beaver,” starring Gibson as a man having a mental breakdown centered around a hand puppet. For some reason. Perhaps it’s best not to speculate.



4. Robert Redford

Here we go. The erstwhile founder of the Sundance Film Festival made his bones early in his career as a blond, handsome leading man opposite notables such as Natalie Wood and Jane Fonda in “Inside Daisy Clover” and “The Chase,” respectively. He broke out of that mold with the legendary film “Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid” with Paul Newman. He’d re-team with Newman and get an Oscar nomination out of 1973’s “The Sting,” becoming one of the biggest stars in the world. His first time in the director’s chair came with 1980’s dark family drama “Ordinary People,” and he knocked it out of the park, winning Best Director and Best Picture. He’s continued to produce stellar work behind the camera, with “The Milagro Beanfield War,” “A River Runs Through It” and “Quiz Show.” We’ll just quietly ignore The Fresh Prince Magic Golf Movie.



5. Bobcat Goldthwait

Wait, what? Yes, that “Police Academy” guy who screamed a lot in “One Crazy Summer” dropped that yelling stand-up schtick completely and started making black comedies that explore weird areas that no one else touches. Starting in 1991 with the alcoholic clown cult classic “Shakes The Clown,” and continuing with a pair of Sundance Film Festival entries – 2006’s “Sleeping Dogs Lie” (about a woman hiding the disturbing secret that she once fellated her dog on a whim) and 2009’s “World’s Greatest Dad” (starring Robin Williams as a father who covers up his son’s autoerotic asphyxiation death and writes a best-selling suicide note), he’s managed to tackle these strange subjects that could be broad comedies with a deft dramatic touch and realism. The 2011 Toronto Film Festival entrant “God Bless America” tells the story of a doomed, depressed man who starts a “Bonnie and Clyde” style killing spree against everything that sucks about America with an awful reality-show star. It’s a unique road Bobcat is paving, not for the easily-offended, but it’s a road worth traveling.

Continue to next page > >
Neurotica_105_MPX-1920×1080

New Nasty

Whips, Chains and Hand Sanitizer

Turn On The Full Season Of Neurotica At IFC's Comedy Crib

Posted by on

Jenny Jaffe has a lot going on: She’s writing for Disney’s upcoming Big Hero 6: The Series, developing comedy projects with pals at Devastator Press, and she’s straddling the line between S&M and OCD as the creator and star of the sexyish new series Neurotica, which has just made its debut on IFC’s Comedy Crib. Jenny gave us some extremely intimate insight into what makes Neurotica (safely) sizzle…

IFC_CC_Neurotica_Series_Image4

IFC: How would you describe Neurotica to a fancy network executive you met in an elevator?

Jenny: Neurotica is about a plucky Dominatrix with OCD trying to save her small-town dungeon.

IFC: How would you describe Neurotica to a drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?

Jenny: Neurotica is about a plucky Dominatrix with OCD trying to save her small-town dungeon. You’re great. We should get coffee sometime. I’m not just saying that. I know other people just say that sometimes but I really feel like we’re going to be friends, you know? Here, what’s your number, I’ll call you so you can have my number!

IFC: What’s your comedy origin story?

Jenny: Since I was a kid I’ve dealt with severe OCD and anxiety. Comedy has always been one of the ways I’ve dealt with that. I honestly just want to help make people feel happy for a few minutes at a time.

IFC: What was the genesis of Neurotica?

Jenny: I’m pretty sure it was a title-first situation. I was coming up with ideas to pitch to a production company a million years ago (this isn’t hyperbole; I am VERY old) and just wrote down “Neurotica”; then it just sort of appeared fully formed. “Neurotica? Oh it’s an over-the-top romantic comedy about a Dominatrix with OCD, of course.” And that just happened to hit the buttons of everything I’m fascinated by.

Neurotica_series_image_1

IFC: How would you describe Ivy?

Jenny: Ivy is everything I love in a comedy character – she’s tenacious, she’s confident, she’s sweet, she’s a big wonderful weirdo.

IFC: How would Ivy’s clientele describe her?

Jenny:  Open-minded, caring, excellent aim.

IFC: Why don’t more small towns have local dungeons?

Jenny: How do you know they don’t?

IFC: What are the pros and cons of joining a chain mega dungeon?

Jenny: You can use any of their locations but you’ll always forget you have a membership and in a year you’ll be like “jeez why won’t they let me just cancel?”

IFC: Mouths are gross! Why is that?

Jenny: If you had never seen a mouth before and I was like “it’s a wet flesh cave with sharp parts that lives in your face”, it would sound like Cronenberg-ian body horror. All body parts are horrifying. I’m kind of rooting for the singularity, I’d feel way better if I was just a consciousness in a cloud.

See the whole season of Neurotica right now on IFC’s Comedy Crib.

The-Craft

The ’90s Are Back

The '90s live again during IFC's weekend marathon.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Everett Digital, Columbia Pictures

We know what you’re thinking: “Why on Earth would anyone want to reanimate the decade that gave us Haddaway, Los Del Rio, and Smash Mouth, not to mention Crystal Pepsi?”

via GIPHY

Thoughts like those are normal. After all, we tend to remember lasting psychological trauma more vividly than fleeting joy. But if you dig deep, you’ll rediscover that the ’90s gave us so much to fondly revisit. Consider the four pillars of true ’90s culture.

Boy Bands

We all pretended to hate them, but watch us come alive at a karaoke bar when “I Want It That Way” comes on. Arguably more influential than Brit Pop and Grunge put together, because hello – Justin Timberlake. He’s a legitimate cultural gem.

Man-Child Movies

Adam Sandler is just behind The Simpsons in terms of his influence on humor. Somehow his man-child schtick didn’t get old until the aughts, and his success in that arena ushered in a wave of other man-child movies from fellow ’90s comedians. RIP Chris Farley (and WTF Rob Schneider).

via GIPHY

via GIPHY

Teen Angst

In horror, dramas, comedies, and everything in between: Troubled teens! Getting into trouble! Who couldn’t relate to their First World problems, plaid flannels, and lose grasp of the internet?

Mainstream Nihilism

From the Coen Bros to Fincher to Tarantino, filmmakers on the verge of explosive popularity seemed interested in one thing: mind f*cking their audiences by putting characters in situations (and plot lines) beyond anyone’s control.

Feeling better about that walk down memory lane? Good. Enjoy the revival.

via GIPHY

And revisit some important ’90s classics all this weekend during IFC’s ’90s Marathon. Check out the full schedule here.

PL_409_MPX-1920×1080

Get Physical

DVDs are the new Vinyl

Portlandia Season 7 Now Available On Disc.

Posted by on
GIFs via Giffy

In this crazy digital age, sometimes all we really want is to reach out and touch something. Maybe that’s why so many of us are still gung-ho about owning stuff on DVD. It’s tangible. It’s real. It’s tech from a bygone era that still feels relevant, yet also kitschy and retro. It’s basically vinyl for people born after 1990.

via GIPHY

Inevitably we all have that friend whose love of the disc is so absolutely repellent that he makes the technology less appealing. “The resolution, man. The colors. You can’t get latitude like that on a download.” Go to hell, Tim.

Yes, Tim sucks, and you don’t want to be like Tim, but maybe he’s onto something and DVD is still the future. Here are some benefits that go beyond touch.

It’s Decor and Decorum

With DVDs and a handsome bookshelf you can show off your great taste in film and television without showing off your search history. Good for first dates, dinner parties, family reunions, etc.

via GIPHY

Forget Public Wifi

Warm up that optical drive. No more awkwardly streaming episodes on shady free wifi!

via GIPHY

Inter-not

Internet service goes down. It happens all the time. It could happen right now. Then what? Without a DVD on hand you’ll be forced to make eye contact with your friends and family. Or worse – conversation.

via GIPHY

Self Defense

You can’t throw a download like a ninja star. Think about it.

via GIPHY

If you’d like to experience the benefits DVD ownership yourself, Portlandia Season 7 is now available on DVD and Blue-Ray.