DID YOU READ

Stephen Chbosky talks “The Perks of Being a Wallflower”, Blu-ray extras, and his favorite teen films

Stephen-Chbosky

Posted by on

Stephen Chbosky’s much beloved 1999 novel “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” took so long to make it to the silver screen that most fans had nearly given up hope. Little did they know, however, that Chbosky was just biding his time waiting for the right cast to come along to play the emotional roles he’s held so close to his vest for the past decade. More than ten years since the book’s release, 2012 finally saw Chbosky adapt and direct his own novel for the big screen as “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” (available now on Blu-ray and DVD) wowed critics with its unflinching and heartfelt look at teen life, its stellar cast, and its absolute refusal to disappoint the dedicated fans who have waited for so long to see Sam, Charlie, and Patrick come to life.

Chbosky recently sat down with IFC.com to discuss the process of adapting his blockbuster novel, working with his young, talented cast, and the coming-of-age films that inspire him.

IFC: On the Blu-ray bonus features, you mention that “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” took so long to make it to the big screen because you were waiting for this cast. How did you find and assemble this cast, and how did you know it was the right one?

STEPHEN CHBOSKY: Once I was done with the screenplay, I knew what I was looking for, not only in terms of finding great actors, but also finding great people, which was very important. I knew that if I was ever going to truly portray Sam, I couldn’t just find some diva that was going to “play” her. I needed someone who would embody it – somebody kind and generous like Emma [Watson].

We had wonderful casting directors, wonderful producers, and we all had ideas. I just did my work and I saw 500 or 600 kids. There’s always that moment when someone walks in the door, or you’re on Skype with somebody like Nina [Dobrev] in Atlanta or Ezra [Miller] in New York because you don’t have time to fly all these places. Little by little you assemble your cast. It’s a great, great thing.

IFC: What you’ve done on this film is basically the ultimate writer’s dream. You have this huge blockbuster book that’s meant so much to so many people for a very long time, and then you actually get to write the screenplay and direct it. Most writers have zero say in their movie adaptations. How did you pull it off?

SC: Those writers that have zero say in their movie adaptations have zero say because they sell it. If you don’t sell it, and you do it yourself, and you wait until the screenplay is ready, you don’t have to worry about that. I wrote that screenplay until I knew it was as good as it was ever going to be. Then I went and got my producers, and they had a couple of ideas that I didn’t have that made it a little better. Then I got Emma and Logan [Lerman], and they had some thoughts that made me consider some moments that made it better. Ultimately, I was always in charge of this train, and I was never going to give it up.

IFC: So you would have been fine with it if this film never came to be and you just had this great book to hold onto?

SC: I had to be. Listen, I would have been crushed had the movie not happened, but I had to be willing to have it not happen if I was going to do it right.

IFC: Ezra mentioned to me that he and Mae begged you to let their characters be chain smokers like they were in the book. Was there anything in the novel that you wish could have made it to the big screen?

SC: Well, I’m really happy now that the DVD and the Blu-ray is coming out so people can see some of the deleted scenes. I really wanted the subplot of Charlie’s sister. I just felt that, in the context of the movie – and, listen, it was my decision to cut it – that it just made the movie just a little bit edged on the side of too much.

Same with the poem. The poem is gorgeous. As a standalone piece, it’s amazing. There are these moments that, as standalone moments, I think are beautiful, but it’s just that the tree is great, but the forest didn’t work as well with it in there.

It would have been a lot more difficult to cut some things out in the era before the DVD extra because I knew that these things could still live on. I insisted with the studio that we be given a proper budget so that we could scan the negative and mix and score and color correct the deleted scenes. I wanted them to be as good a quality filmmaking as the film itself.

IFC: Were you nervous about how the book would translate to the screen or did all that start to fade away once you locked in your script and you started assembling this amazing cast?

SC: It’s a good question, but I wasn’t really nervous. I was terrified. [Laughs] But in a great way because I just decided early on that this was either going to be everything that I wanted it to be for the book, for myself, and for the fans of the book, or it was not going to exist. And when you put that standard on yourself it makes you work really hard because it’s not about just selling some screenplay or just making some movie. It was about doing it right. I thrived under the pressure, though, so I enjoyed it.

IFC: Teen films these days don’t exactly get the best rap. Are you surprised at all how well the film was received critically?

SC: Yes and no. I knew that when you make an honest movie about what young people go through that you are risking enormous backlash. You know, very often people just want to dismiss what kids go through as trivial. When I was that age, I didn’t think it was trivial or young folly at all. So, in that respect, I was pleasantly surprised that the adult critics embraced it as much as they did.

IFC: The film is steeped in this 1990’s nostalgia, but it also feels really timeless to me. Was it a concern for you guys to make the film have this timeless feel?

SC: Yeah, that was my vision for it. There are a few touches of the 90’s with the music, the cars, a little bit of the fashion, and other things. Some things from the 80’s as well. So there’s enough in there if you want to seek it out.

When I did a study of all the coming-of-age movies that meant a lot to me, whether it was “The Graduate” or “Rebel Without a Cause” or “Dead Poet’s Society” they all had that timeless feel. None of them were completely married to the details of their age. They felt timeless in their treatment of it. That’s what made them resonate with me. That’s what makes those movies still among my absolute favorite movies, and I wanted to follow that tradition.

IFC: I was actually going to ask you what teen or coming-of-age films you enjoyed and may have served as some inspiration for your movie.

SC: There are so many. “Rebel Without a Cause” “The Graduate” “Harold and Maude” “Stand by Me” “Dead Poet’s Society” “The Breakfast Club” and “Juno” I would say those are the big seven.

There have been other great ones. “Election” was great. “Rushmore” was great.

IFC: I’m glad to see “Harold and Maude” in there!

SC: Me too. “Harold and Maude” was a seminal movie for me because it’s not only a beautiful love story, but it’s also about the moment when misfits find each other.

IFC: Can you tell me a little bit about what I thought was one of the best scenes in the film: Ezra, Emma, and Logan dancing to “Come On, Eileen”?

SC: It was in the script. I didn’t specify the song, but I always secretly wanted it to be that song. I picked the song and the first day that I got Ezra, Emma, and Logan together for lunch, I sent Ezra and Emma off with our choreographer to construct the dance. I had some of my own thoughts as well, but I thought, “What better way to bond two people who don’t know each other than to just make them dance together?”

The fact that they both love dancing and they both sing, they have that circus performer spirit in them. It bonded them very quickly.

And Logan just did his job. [Laughs] He knew exactly how to dance off that wall. So cute.

IFC: Do you have a favorite memory of the film, either on screen or off?

SC: I have two. One is certainly watching Emma Watson fly through the tunnel. That was extraordinary. And that’s why I included that entire silent take of her just going through that tunnel in the Blu-ray. There was something about watching her so happy and free going through. I’ll never forget it because I felt like that moment gave her something. Something for the character, yes, but much more importantly something for her life.

This is a young woman who grew up in the eye of a hurricane and who had enormous pressures on her from the time she was nine, ten, eleven years old. This is her just getting to be a kid. So I’ll always treasure that.

The other one is really funny to say because it’s such a small piece of the movie, but it’s prom. We had maybe half an hour to shoot going to the prom limo and the sun was going down and we were always up against it because we were a lower budget movie. I had it scripted, but I just had them do it. What was amazing was watching Emma, Logan, Ezra, and Mae – none of whom ever had prom – this was their prom. These four young people who I adore. They got to have prom, and that meant a lot to me. I’ll always remember that because I’ll always love these kids.

IFC: You actually wrote one of my favorite TV shows of the past decade or so: “Jericho”. There have been so many rumors of the show continuing on Netflix or there being a movie or something else entirely. Have you heard anything positive in that direction?

SC: All of the rumors that you hear? All those conversations? They’re real. Whether or not it’s ever going to happen, I have no idea. I have no control over that. I hope it does for the fans. I hope it does for the cast. I think we had a great ensemble and we have really devoted, terrific fans. So, I hope so, but I don’t know. If you asked me to bet on it, I wouldn’t. I just don’t know what the odds are, but these are real conversations that are happening.

IFC: After this film, you’re going to be a hot commodity in the director’s chair. What’s next for you?

SC: Right now I’m almost at the end of my second novel and I’m going to adapt that book as well.

IFC: It’s not going to take ten years this time, though, right? [Laughs]

SC: No no no. It won’t at all. I found, through the process of doing “The Perks of Being a Wallflower”, that I really love directing movies and I love writing books and so this will become the centerpiece of my career for the next ten or twenty years. Doing these adaptations.

Listen, if something came along that somebody else wrote or an adaptation of another book that I could just do, if I connected to the material, I would love to do that. So I’m always open to it.

In the meantime, I’m just going to keep doing what I do.

Stephen Chbosky’s “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” is available on Blu-ray and DVD now.

Watch More
blog-ringwald-featured

Good Golly Ms. Molly

Ranking the Guys From Molly Ringwald’s John Hughes Movies

Catch Molly Ringwald in The Breakfast Club during IFC's '80s Weekend.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Universal Studios

John Hughes isn’t the only one who loved Molly Ringwald throughout the 1980s. Thanks to his trio of Brat Pack movies starring the teen icon, we all did. And since her character’s biggest problem is often who is going to take her to the next school dance, we’ve decided to take a look at her many memorable suitors and rank them from lamest to dreamiest. (For more Molly, catch The Breakfast Club during IFC’s ’80s Weekend.)

10. Long Duk Dong (Gedde Watanabe), Sixteen Candles

Long Duk Dong
Universal Studios

In addition to annoying Sam (Ringwald), foreign exchange student “The Donger” manages to score a date at the school dance before her. Plus, he’s got the whole dated cultural stereotype thing going against him.


9. Bryce (John Cusack), Sixteen Candles

John Cusack Sixteen Candles
Universal Studios

As one of the geeks who pines for Sam, Bryce may have some nifty gadgets but he’s barely a blip on her radar. Give it a few years, Cusack. You’ll get the girl eventually.


8. Andrew Clark (Emilio Estevez), The Breakfast Club

Universal Studios
Universal Studios

You may have missed it but at the start of their day-long detention at Shermer High School, Andrew casually invites Claire (Ringwald) to a party that very night. She brushes him off. Which leaves him with Ally Sheedy’s “basketcase” Allison styled by Claire as an in-crowd lookalike. Which probably means Andrew still wants Claire.


7. Brian Johnson (Anthony Michael Hall), The Breakfast Club

Universal Studios
Universal Studios

Brian’s the only one on the list who doesn’t openly pursue Molly, but we can totally see him pining after Claire from his desk. In fact, Brian puts his hat on his lap at one point to hide his erection then boasts of having sex with her. Right, like maybe in your mind, Brian.


6. Steff (James Spader), Pretty in Pink

pretty-spader
Paramount Pictures

Spoiled rich kid Steff has been hitting on Andie (Ringwald) in the school parking lot for years yet she won’t give him the time of day. His revenge? He trashes her to his best friend then makes her feel like a hoser at his house party. Seriously, she should ask him to the prom and then leave him hanging. This guy needs a takedown.


5. “Farmer Ted” (Anthony Michael Hall), Sixteen Candles

16-candes-2
Universal Studios

Ted’s all false bravado and his constant fawning over Ringwald’s Sam is kind of cute until he crosses the line and starts charging admission so his fellow geeks can gawk at her polka-dotted underwear. His blackout sex with a senior doesn’t bode well either. He’s young, so maybe he’ll grow out of it.


4. Jake Ryan (Michael Schoeffling), Sixteen Candles

Universal Studios
Universal Studios

Yes, dreamy Jake gets Sam a belated birthday cake and saves her from attending her sister’s wedding reception which is bound to be a bummer. But he also pawns off his drunken ex on a freshman after remarking that she’s passed out upstairs and could be done any which way. Plus he cruises Sam before he’s even single. Jake? More like jerk.


3. John Bender (Judd Nelson), The Breakfast Club

Universal Studios
Universal Studios

Bender’s so deep, he bares his soul and the cigar burn he got from his pop. He’s also the first guy to see Claire’s panties up close while she’s wearing them. By the end of the movie, he’s got her diamond earring in his palm and she’s got him in the palm of her hand.


2. Duckie (Jon Cryer), Pretty in Pink

Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures

Who defends Andie’s honor when Steff and the other rich kids put her down? Who’s there to escort her into the prom when Blane stands her up? Who exhibits somewhat stalker behavior by bicycling by her house every day? It’s Duckie! “Do I offend??” Yes, but we still love ya, Duck.


1. Blane (Andrew McCarthy), Pretty in Pink

Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures

He stood her up at her last prom but we just know he’d never do that again. I mean, he LOVES her. And frankly, she loves him. Plus, she tricked him into buying a Steve Lawrence album, for God’s sake. They both jerked each other around. Get over those abandonment issues with your mom, Andie. This one’s a keeper.

Watch More
The Last American Virgin 1980

Back to School

10 Underrated ’80s Teen Movies You Need to See

Go back to high school with The Breakfast Club, Footloose and more during IFC's '80s Weekend.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Cannon Film/ Everett Collection.

The 1980s saw the rise of cable television and the fall of the Soviet Union, but you can make a case that it’s also the decade where the teen movie really came into its own. Whether you were once a brain, an athlete, a basket case, a princess or a criminal, we can all relate to ’80s teen movies. But as much as we love John Hughes, there were some great teen movies from the Atari decade that had huge laughs and a few life lessons that didn’t come from the mind of the great and soulful teen whisperer. Before you flashback with IFC’s ’80s Weekend, check out these 10 underrated teen movies that deserve to be seen.

10. The Last American Virgin

The success of the hilariously raunchy Porky’s jump-started the R-Rated teen comedy genre, and no movie captures the way-too-harsh reality of being a sex-crazed and hormone filled teen like 1982’s The Last American Virgin.

Starring Diane Franklin of Better Off Dead and Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure fame, The Last American Virgin has a gritty look and a cast of young actors who could’ve come straight from a Devo concert or roller rink. This movie is the greatest PSA for teen abstinence ever made as our hero Gary (Lawrence Monoson) and his pals go through some raw and un-sexy attempts to lose their virginity, including an awkward encounter with a prostitute that would never be confused for Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman.

The Last American Virgin is mostly remembered today for having the saddest ending ever for a teen comedy that also has Oingo Boingo on the soundtrack. It’s right up there with the ending to Old Yeller, except it’s Gary’s heart that gets shot to pieces by his jerk friend Rick (Steve Antin) and the girl he thought he loved.


9. Hiding Out

The 1987 high school comedy Hiding Out gave Jon Cryer the chance to play an adult after immortalizing himself in teen moviedom as Duckie in Pretty in Pink. Except here he plays a twenty-something stock broker forced to pose as a teenager in order to hide out from the Mob. It helps that when he shaves off his beard, he’s got a baby face and convinces his nephew Patrick (an even more baby faced Keith Coogan) to hide the fact that he’s living in the upstairs bedroom from his aunt.

Cryer’s Andrew Morenski becomes the impulsively named “Maxwell Hauser” and proceeds to have a much more popular high school experience the second time around. He develops a kinship with the adorably sweet Ryan (Mystic Pizza‘s Annabeth Gish) and ends up running for Class President, which isn’t the best way to keep a low profile. Cryer and Gish have a sweet chemistry together and Coogan’s Andrew has some funny moments trying to fit in with the cool guys at school.

If you’re looking for an ’80s blast complete with a roller rink date and a soundtrack that includes everything from the Johnny Rotten band Public Image Ltd. to Pretty Poison’s pop gem “Catch Me (I’m Falling),” then you’d be wise to spend a night in with Hiding Out.


8. Little Darlings

Featuring ’70s child stars Kristy McNichol and Tatum O’Neal as rival 15-year-olds coming of age at summer camp, 1980’s Little Darlings is like a feature length “After school special” that’ll leave you feeling as good as its soft rock soundtrack. McNichol is Angel (don’t let the name fool you), the rough-around-the edges tomboy who’s new to the camp. O’Neal plays Ferris Whitney, the girl seemingly born with a silver spoon in her mouth. All the girls in their bunk are likeable and funny and the story revolves around a bet Angel and Ferris make to see who loses their virginity first.(No easy feat at an all-girls camp.)

Little Darlings is the movie that every parent should have their teenage daughter watch, as the emotions Angel and Ferris go through are far more raw and real than the ones depicted in glossy modern teen dramas. Retro cameo alert: In addition to Matt Dillon in an early heartthrob role, look for a very young (and very blonde) Cynthia Nixon as one of the girls in the bunk who are all not quite ready for adulthood.


7. My Bodyguard

Before Matt Dillon solidified his teen idol status as the cool, unstable brother figure greaser in The Outsiders, he terrorized Chris Makepeace as a bully in My Bodyguard. Makepeace, who you may remember as the homesick camper in Meatballs, could’ve used Bill Murray in this film as he plays a kid whose dad (Martin Mull) becomes a manager at a Chicago hotel, forcing young Clifford Peache to become the new kid at school.

With a name like Clifford Peache, it’s no wonder he becomes a target for Matt Dillon’s Moody who likes to shake down the smaller kids for lunch money. Basically the Mafia boss of the school, Moody offers Clifford protection from another teen named Linderman (Adam Baldwin), who rumor has it killed his own brother. In a fun twist, Clifford befriends Linderman and tries to get him to be his bodyguard against Moody.

Baldwin (no relation to Alec) is great in his film debut as the titular bodyguard, and the casting of Ruth Gordon (Harold and Maude) as Clifford’s cantankerous grandma helps give My Bodyguard its quirky hidden gem status. (Keep an eye out for a young Joan Cusack as the geeky Shelley.)


6. River’s Edge

In the dark 1986 drama River’s Edge, the kids live in a stoned haze and run wild while the parents all seem to be more messed up than they are. The story revolves around how a group of teens react when one of their friends, Samson (Daniel Roebuck, delivering a truly creepy performance), kills a young woman for no apparent reason. Matt (Keanu Reeves) and Clarissa (Ione Skye) try to come to terms with what their friend has done while Layne (Crispin Glover, bringing a Nic Cage level of over-the-top intensity) tries to cover up the murder.

You know a movie is dark when it has Dennis Hopper playing a crazed Vietnam Vet who’s a little too attached to a blow up doll and he’s not even the creepiest character. That award belongs to Matt’s little brother Tim (Joshua John Miller), who gives one of the all-time creepiest/funniest child actor performances as a punk kid who doesn’t just fall in with the wrong crowd but is the wrong crowd. Tim’s crazy eyes, along with everything Crispin Glover does, helps make River’s Edge a cult classic.


5. Vision Quest

Forget the Rocky movies — if you were a teenage boy in the ’80s, Vision Quest was the movie that had you doing push-ups in your living room. When Louden Swain (Matthew Modine) decides to drop over 20 pounds to wrestle an immovable object/cyborg of a state champion rival, he takes on the biggest challenge of his life and slowly wins the trust of his teammates and coach.

Featuring Linda Fiorentino as the older woman that Louden falls for, Vision Quest is a movie about how what you can accomplish in six minutes can change your life. It’s also a pure shot of ’80s awesomeness with Michael Shoeffling, aka Jake Ryan from Sixteen Candles, sporting a Mohawk and The Material Girl herself performing “Crazy for You” at a club.


4. Heaven Help Us

Welcome to St. Basil’s, a Catholic school where they preach discipline and patience — except patience is a paddle wielded by Brother Constance (Jay Patterson), a sadistic priest dedicated to instilling his will and spoiling any fun had at the all-boys school. In 1965 Brooklyn, Michael Dunn (Andrew McCarthy) quickly learns that it’s not so much fun being the newbie at a strict Catholic school, until he reluctantly becomes friends with Kevin Dillon’s wise-cracking Rooney.

The gang — which includes Caesar (Malcome Danare), a know-it-all nerd who carries a laminated note to get him out of any gym related activities — end up breaking the rules and engaging in teenage shenanigans in their quest to meet girls. McCarthy’s Dunn is the heart of the movie as he recently lost his parents and meets Danni (Mary Stuart Masterson), a girl who runs the local soda shop and cares for her depressed father.

Masterson exudes approachable cool, and shares some sweet moments with McCarthy. Look for The Princess Bride‘s Wallace Shawn as a priest who gives a lecture on the evils of “lussst.”


3. The Legend of Billie Jean

Teenage boys in the ’80s may have had Heather Locklear’s poster on their wall, but they dreamed of Helen Slater as Billie Jean. Slater stars as a Texas girl who lives in a trailer park with her mother and her brother Binx (played by a young Christian Slater) and dreams of living in Vermont. When spoiled and cocky Hubie (Barry Tubb) hits on Billie Jean and steals Binx’s scooter, it sets off a chain of events that leads to Billie Jean, Binx and their friends becoming fugitives.

Billie Jean lives up to her outlaw name as she becomes famous and helps people she meets while on the run. At one point, Billie Jean cuts her hair to look like Joan of Arc and also conveniently looks a lot like a blonde Pat Benatar, whose song “Invincible” is played throughout the film. Billie memorably says the line “Fair is Fair,” but it’s not fair that The Legend of Billie Jean isn’t legendary in its own right.


2. The Hollywood Knights

The Hollywood Knights might’ve been riding on the ’60s revival coattails that American Graffiti, but the George Lucas classic didn’t have a scene where prankster Newbomb Turk (Robert Wuhl) farts “Volare” into a microphone at a school dance. This classic scene of teenage shenanigans is just one of numerous Animal House-style moments that have lived on in the memories of anyone who stayed up to watch The Hollywood Knights on late night cable in the ’80s.

Newbomb is the goofball of The Knights, a car gang with a longstanding tradition of annoying the stuffy Beverly Hills Resident’s Association. The gang of teenage misfits causes havoc for the snobs who shut down the Knights’ hangout, Tubby’s Drive-In. It doesn’t get more ’80s than a film where a young Michelle Pfeiffer makes out with Tony Danza and Fran “The Nanny” Drescher turns up as a young fan of Newbomb’s antics.


1. The Flamingo Kid

Directed by the late, great comedy master Gary Marshall, The Flamingo Kid is one of the most likeable and underrated films of the ’80s. Matt Dillon breaks out of the tough teen mold as Jeffrey Willis, a kid who just graduated high school in 1960s Brooklyn and gets a job working at a posh Long Island Beach club that his upper middle class friends belong to.

A classic fish out of water (or fish out of Brooklyn) story ensues when wide-eyed Jeffrey meets a flashy car salesman (Richard Creena) who shows him a life his working class father doesn’t understand. Jeffrey’s not just another kid from Brooklyn — he also happens to be a world-class gin rummy player, and when he gets a chance at joining the big game, he makes the right choice at the table and in life. Give this one a shot and you’ll be rooting for “The Flamingo Kid” to say “Sweet Ginger Brown.”

Catch The Breakfast Club, Footloose and Fast Times at Ridgemont High during IFC’s ’80s Weekend!

Watch More
The Breakfast Club Cast

Style Council

Ranking the Best and Worst ’80s Movie Fashions

Get retro with The Breakfast Club and Footloose during IFC's '80s Weekend.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Universal Pictures

In the era of big hair, there were some big fashion mistakes. In honor of the non-stop movie awesomeness coming your way during IFC’s ’80s Weekend, we’ve rated your favorite ’80s movie characters based off a trusty Reaganomics Scale. Here’s how we’re scoring the duds worn by characters from The Breakfast Club, Back to the Future and more on a scale of one to five Ronnies:

Awesome!Ron RRon RRon RRon RRon R

Rad!  Ron RRon RRon RRon R

Tubular! Ron RRon RRon R

Bogus! Ron RRon R

Gag me with a spoon! Ron R

As Doc Brown would say, we’ve gotta go back… to the ’80s!

10. Chevy Chase, National Lampoon’s Vacation

Clark Griswold
Warner Bros.

Clark Griswold is a lot of things: A well-meaning family man, a slightly deranged Wally World enthusiast and a pretty solid dresser. Sure, his dad-attire is a little dorky, but what dad attire isn’t? Overall, Griswold’s look still make sense in 2016. And for that we give him one enthusiastic Marty Moose chuckle.

Reagan-meter: Rad!
Ron RRon RRon RRon R

Click here to see all airings of National Lampoon’s Vacation on IFC.


9. Jamie Lee Curtis, A Fish Called Wanda

Fish Called Wanda
MGM

Witty, scheming Wanda can’t pick a lane when it comes to fashion. This pink fuzzy sweater is the worst of her choices.

Reagan-meter: Gag me with a spoon!
Ron R


8. Kevin Bacon, Footloose

Kevin Bacon Footloose
Paramount Pictures

For his classic abandoned warehouse dance sequence, Kevin Bacon wears the blandest ensemble possible: a plain sweatshirt and jeans. The dirty duds made sense for his portrayal of Ren McCormack, an angsty teen with something to prove. However, his style does not inspire us to cut loose.

Reagan-meter: Gag me with a spoon!
Ron R

However, later on he rocks a sweet tux to the prom:

Kevin Bacon Footloose
Paramount Pictures

For that look, Ren scores much higher. This is our time to dance!

Reagan-meter: Tubular!
Ron RRon RRon R

Click here to see all airings of Footloose on IFC.


7. Jennifer Connelly, Labyrinth

Labyrinth Sara
TriStar Pictures

We love how brave Sarah Williams is amid creepy Muppets and David Bowie’s epic Goblin King hair. However, her fashion choices are as confusing as the labyrinth itself. Another victim of the vest-crime, Sarah would’ve been better off to lose it and stick to the basic pieces underneath.

Reagan-Meter: Bogus!
Ron RRon R

Much better is the dress she wears during the ballroom scene. If you can ignore the fact that Sarah’s a teenager being seduced by a grown-up, it’s a pretty stylish and timeless look.

Labyrinth
TriStar Pictures

Reagan-Meter: Rad! 
Ron RRon RRon RRon R


6. Jon Cryer, Pretty in Pink

Duckie Pretty in Pink
Paramount Pictures

Duckie’s clothing reflects his off-beat sense of humor and (unearned but still endearing) confident air. With the layers of color, fedora and glasses, he looks like he belongs more in Williamsburg, Brooklyn circa 2016 than 1986.

Reagan-Meter: Tubular!
Ron RRon RRon R


5. Corey Feldman, The Lost Boys

The Lost Boys
Warner Bros.

Possibly the coolest adolescent vampire hunter on the planet, Edgar Frog ain’t afraid of nothing. His camo shirt and red headband are a bit Rambo Jr., but Feldman’s youthful intensity makes it work.

Reagan-Meter: Tubular! 
Ron RRon RRon R


4. Melanie Griffith, Working Girl

Working Girl
20th Century Fox

Mixing power suits with big hair and the occasional fancy gown for formal events, Melanie Griffith’s Tess McGill defined ’80s workplace attire. Bonus points for tossing the heels and opting for comfortable tennis shoes.

Reagan-Meter: Rad! 
Ron RRon RRon RRon R


3. Michael J. Fox, Back to the Future

Back to the Future
Universal Pictures

Michael J. Fox can do no harm, but his outfits in BTTF are not so McFly. The orange vest reads like a life preserver drowning in an ocean of denim. Great Scott, this is one unforgivable outfit.

Reagan-meter: Bogus! 
Ron RRon R


2. Winona Ryder, Heathers

Heathers

Mixing business casual and country club chic, Winona and the rest of the Heathers created a look that is still a favorite Halloween costume theme.

Reagan-meter: Awesome! 
Ron RRon RRon RRon RRon R


1. Molly Ringwald,  The Breakfast Club

Molly Ringwald
Universal Pictures

Dubbed “The Princess” of The Breakfast Club, Claire rocks a stylish pink blouse and brown wraparound skirt with matching boots. We dig her poised ensemble and agree that she is fashion royalty.

Reagan-Meter: Awesome! 
Ron RRon RRon RRon RRon R

Click here to see all airings of The Breakfast Club on IFC.

Get the scoop on IFC’s ’80s Weekend from “The Gipper” himself!

Watch More
Powered by ZergNet