Kelly McGillis looks back at the legacy of “Top Gun”


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“Top Gun” might be getting old, but Paramount Picture is making sure the movie looks better than ever. On February 19, a newly remastered 3D Blu-ray re-release of the film is hitting store shelves following a six-day theatrical run in IMAX 3D theaters.

In anticipation of “Top Gun” being introduced to a new generation of audiences, leading lady Kelly McGillis chatted on the phone with IFC about the impact the movie has had on her life. She surprisingly hasn’t seen the flick since it came out, but because of its lasting legacy it still affects her in many ways.

IFC: Hi, Kelly. It must be a little surreal for you talking about “Top Gun” all day. I can’t believe it’s been almost 27 years since it came out.

KELLY MCGILLIS: Yeah, I can’t either. It’s a little bit challenging because I haven’t seen the film since it first came out, so good luck. [laughs]

IFC: So you haven’t seen it in 3D, then? They just converted it.

KM: No, I haven’t. I haven’t seen the film since it’s been done.

IFC: Oh, wow. Obviously this is a film that’s lasted well over the years. What’s the experience been like having that legacy attached to you?

KM: It’s wonderful. I didn’t know while making the movie that it would have such legs, and I think it’s wonderful and I think it’s a testament to Tony Scott’s vision, I really do. And I think it’s just a testament truly to the innocence of the movie. The good guy/bad guy kind of thing; very pre-9/11. Nothing sinister about it. I’m amazed, actually. I’m amazed that it lasted this long.

IFC: That innocence, is that the main reason you think it’s had such a great legacy or do you think there’s anything else to it that helps it still resonate with people?

KM: I think the style of the piece and the music. It sort of encapsulated the ’80s, what the ’80s were all about. I think that a lot of people of my age kind of really remember that time fondly. It will be interesting to see what a whole new generation of people think about that movie.

IFC: I definitely think it’s interesting that the movie is still such a part of our pop culture now. Looking back, are there any specific moments in the movie that you would be interested in seeing in 3D, or that you look forward to other people seeing?

KM: Oh no, I can’t think of any. Sorry. [laughs]

IFC: I haven’t seen it in 3D yet, but I’m intrigued by how the aerial scenes will look.

KM: Yeah, I think those will be really fun in 3D. I think that would be really fun.

IFC: I know the sequel isn’t happening but that it had been discussed in the past. Was there any talk of you coming back for that?

KM: No.

IFC: You recently showed “We Are What We Are” at Sundance. Can you talk a little bit about your involvement in that movie? People seemed to respond well to it in reviews and say that it was a refreshing take on the horror genre.

KM: I had worked with Jim Mickle before and he had called me and wanted me to come up and do this little part Marge, and I adored working with Jim when I did “Stake Land” with him, so I said, “Sure.” I kind of left it open to him that any time he wanted me to do anything I’d do it for him, so he called me and I went and did it and it was really fun. I love working with Jim. So that’s why I did it. It’s kind of a funny little part in the middle of this very dark movie. I hope that she’s a little bit of a comic relief.

IFC: Can you talk a bit about what your life has been like since you filmed “Top Gun”? What is the impact the movie has had on your life?

KM: The impact the movie had on my life was that I became a household name and I became very recognizable, and that was very overwhelming for me, because that’s not something I’ve ever striven to be. I don’t like fame for fame’s sake and it’s not something I ever aspired for, and that’s very overwhelming for me. That being said, it did also give me the opportunity to go off and do more artsy kind of stuff. I did a lot of theater, and I think that it gave me the opportunity, monetarily, to be able to do those kinds of things that I like and I enjoy and are challenging for me.

In the last kind of 12 years or so I’ve really been focused on raising a family and, now that my kids are grown up and out of the house, I’m trying to put my toes in the water to see if I can go back to work, but I also love my quiet little life. I’m happy to dabble working here and there. I’m really happy to do that and then live my life.

IFC: Is there anything in particular that you’d like to try and do going forward?

KM: To me, now, it’s no longer about making my living. To me, it’s just about doing things that I think are fun for whatever reason, because if it’s not going to be fun for me I don’t need to be leaving my house. I like my life too much today and I only want to work with people who are fun to work with.

IFC: I’m also curious, have you kept up with the “Top Gun” cast at all? I saw some really cute pictures of you and Tom Cruise at the “Prince of Persia” premiere a couple of years ago.

KM: Not really. If I run into people, I say, “Hey.” It’s not like any time has passed. But I don’t really keep in touch with any people that I’ve worked with. I think it’s a very unique situation that brings a lot of people from their lives in to do a movie, you do the movie, and after that you go home and you live your life. It’s not like you have any common thread going through other than your acting, and once that’s done, I don’t really have much in common with people, I’ve found. It’s not that I don’t like hanging out with people, but I never lived in really L.A., I’ve never kind of been in the middle of all of that stuff, and I’m very happy that I haven’t been.

IFC: You mentioned how this Blu-ray release is going to introduce “Top Gun” to a new generation. What do you hope they take away from it?

KM: I think if they just don’t see too much into it, that it’s a fun film. It’s pure entertainment. There’s nothing more to read into it. There’s no huge deep subtext to the movie. It’s just a fun movie. That’s it.

What impact has “Top Gun” had on you over the years? Tell us in the comments section below or on Facebook and Twitter.


Benders Tonight

5 Ways to Get Ready For Tonight’s All-New Benders

Catch Benders tonight at 10P on IFC

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Thank Chubbys it’s Thursday! Follow these tips for preparing for tonight’s brand new Benders if you want to end the week in style.

1. Throw a Chickenpox Party.

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Beer helps cure chicken pox, right?

2. Get Your Flu Shot.

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Just a friendly reminder that it’s cold and flu season. You don’t want to empty the contents of your stomach during your next game of floor hockey like poor Sebalos. Serious party foul, bro.

3. Recruit Some Friends

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Get your friends on Team Uncle Chubbys with this recruitment video.

4. Practice the “What up, bro?” Move.

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Your bros will never know what hit them.

5. Prepare for The Force to Awaken in You.


There is no try when it comes to chugging beer. Do like the Benders or do not.

Judy Greer Arrested Development

Cheer for Greer

10 Roles That Prove Judy Greer Is a National Treasure

Catch Judy Greer on an all-new Comedy Bang! Bang! tonight at 11P on IFC.

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Judy Greer is basically the human equivalent of bacon — she makes everything better. In the last year alone she’s appeared in Tomorrowland, Entourage, Ant-Man and Jurassic World, doing her best to elevate often underdeveloped characters. With Greer stopping by Comedy Bang! Bang!, we thought it was high time to celebrate the roles that have made her a national treasure. And to see how she scores so many great roles, check out her universal audition tape.

10. Bran Lowenstein, Love Monkey

This show only lasted three episodes for hit factory CBS, but it was enough to earn a cult following. The story of a bunch of young New Yorkers navigating life and love could’ve been yet another Friends clone, but Greer and an all-star cast gave it a funky flavor that would be more at home on cable today.

9. Shannon, Addicted to Fresno

Greer earned rave reviews for her role in this 2015 film about a sex addict who accidentally kills a guy and needs her sister (Natasha Lyonne) to help her get rid of the body. Combining big, broad comedy with some real pathos, this is Greer at her absolute best.

8. Fern Mayo, Jawbreaker

TriStar Pictures

TriStar Pictures

Greer went from geek to glam in this dark cult comedy that proved she was destined for big things.

7. Alice the Waitress, Adaptation.

Is it any wonder that Greer was the dream girl for writer Charlie Kaufman (Nicolas Cage), considering her mix of beauty, brains and being approachable while also being fierce?

6. Lucy Wyman, 13 Going on 30

Here is Greer in one of her patented best friend roles, showing us that even when she doesn’t drive a scene, we can’t take our eyes off of her.

5. Lina Bowman, Married



Greer can currently be seen surviving marriage on this FX series, which allows her to showcase a wide variety of hilarious faces.

4. Julie Speer, The Descendants

Fox Searchlight Pictures

Fox Searchlight Pictures

As home in Oscar-winning dramas as she is in comedy, Greer nails this role of an aggrieved wife who’s just trying to keep her family from falling apart in Alexander Payne’s 2011 film.

3. Ingrid “Fatty Magoo” Nelson, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia

Greer is perfectly cast as Sweet Dee’s arch rival, who always seems to know the exact wrong thing to say to her.

2. Kitty Sanchez, Arrested Development

Imagine Television

Imagine Television

Greer, with the help of the always on Spring Break Kitty Sanchez, helped show the world and Michael Bluth that she was a force to be reckoned with.

1. Cherly Tunt, Archer

FX Productions

FX Productions

And then there’s Cheryl, a bondage loving secretary who moonlights as a world famous country singer. If ever there was a role Greer was born to play, this is it.

Ghostbusters Everett

Ghostbusters In Hell?

7 Lost Ghostbusters Movies That Almost Happened

Catch a Ghostbusters marathon Saturday, Nov. 7th starting at 8P.

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With a new Ghostbusters movie set to debut next year, it’s time to start getting ready for an all out blitz of slime-flavored nostalgia. It’s been 26 years since we’ve seen a Ghostbuster on the big screen, although it hasn’t been for a lack of trying. Ray Stantz himself, Dan Aykroyd, has fought to make another movie in the franchise for decades. Bill Murray famously stood in the way of his efforts, refusing to even read a script. But behind this Ghostbusters Cold War, there were always a plethora of rumors, many coming from Aykroyd himself. Before you catch the Ghostbusters movies this month on IFC, check out a few of the Ghostbusters projects that could’ve been.

1. Ghostbusters in the Future

Columbia Pictures

In Making Ghostbusters by Don Shay, director Ivan Reitman recalled the stacks of pages Aykroyd had spent years putting together when he first joined the project. Originally conceived as a Blues Brothers-esque romp for Aykroyd and John Belushi, the early versions of the script saw a team of “Ghostsmashers” battling demons through a variety of “different planets or dimensional planes.” Reitman describes the first pages as one unending action sequence that was heavy on the ghost busting, light on anything else. He guessed those 50 pages would cost hundreds of millions of dollars (and these are ’80s dollars, remember) so the team went back to the drawing board.

2. Ghostbusters: The Next Generation

Paramount Pictures

Many considered Ghostbusters II a disappointment. Murray supposedly described it as “a whole lot of slime, and not much of us.” Apparently Aykroyd wasn’t in that camp, almost immediately starting work on ideas for a third film. The concept he quickly hit on, and has seemingly continued to champion in one form or another for the last two decades, was the idea of introducing a new, young crop of Ghostbusters. Over the years the rumors of who these new ‘busters might be, often started by Aykroyd himself, have included everyone from comedy superstars to TV witches. Chris Farley, Will Smith, Chris Rock, and Ben Stiller all seem like obvious choices. As time went on Bill Hader, Seth Rogen and Anna Faris joined the list. But Alyssa Milano, Eliza Dushku and Criminal Minds actor Matthew Gray Gubler? Aykroyd may have been drinking a bit too much of his Crystal Skull vodka at that point.

3. Ghostbusters Vs. Greek Gods

Columbia Pictures

In the late ’90s, rumors started to circulate that a script for a third Ghostbusters was ready to go. An early indication of how to sidestep Murray’s involvement, this outing would deal with Egon and Ray trying to keep the business afloat while battling Hades, Greek God of the Underworld. But it appears those rumors were just that. No script has ever seen the light of day.

4. Ghostbusters 3: Hellbent

Aykroyd, along with former SNL writer Tom Davis, penned the script for this iteration. The concept involved the Ghostbusters being sucked into an alternate version of Manhattan, called Manhellton, where the people and places of New York City were replaced by demonic versions. Of course, a new crew was involved. IGN reported at the time that the new team included a pierced New Jersey punk, a “pretty but uptight gymnast,” a “Latino beauty,” a “dread-locked dude” and a young genius whose giant brain made his head comically over-sized. The main villain was reportedly the Devil by way of Donald Trump, which shows Aykroyd may hate ghosts, but he might just be psychic. While the script was never produced (Murray dubbed it “too crazy to comprehend), the story was repurposed as a video game in 2009, with the original cast reprising their roles.

5. Ghostbusters: Cadets

Columbia Pictures

In 2009, Aykroyd and Ramis were at it again, talking up the idea of a new generation of Ghostbusters. Though Murray still wasn’t on board, Aykroyd laid out his vision for the threequel, which would center on the team “learning how to use the psychotron, the accelerators…all these great tools that they’re going to have.” Um…okay? What’s wrong with good ol’ fashioned proton packs?

6. Ghostbusters 3: Grumpy Old ‘Busters


In 2011, Aykroyd dropped hints that the original Ghostbusters would return, even without Murray’s involvement. This time the script would play up their age, adding “My character, Ray, is now blind in one eye and can’t drive the Cadillac…He’s got a bad knee and can’t carry the packs…Egon is too large to get into the harness.” Thank Gozer we never had to see Ray huffing and puffing while carrying a proton pack.

7. Ghostbusters 3: The Return of Oscar?

Columbia Pictures

With Aykroyd trying, and failing, over and over again to get something going, Harold Ramis decided to step in. He hired The Office scribes Gene Stupnitsky and Lee Eisenberg, who also wrote Ramis’ big screen comedy Year One, to put together a script from scratch. Supposedly centered on Peter Venkman and Dana Barrett’s grown son Oscar joining the team, there was some momentum. Once again, Murray still refused to play ball, reportedly shredding a copy of the script and joking he would only appear in the film as a ghost. With the studio refusing to move ahead without Murray’s involvement, the project petered out. The final nail in the coffin appears to be Year One itself. Murray said in a interview at the time, “Well, I never went to see Year One, but people who did, including other Ghostbusters, said it was one of the worst things they had ever seen in their lives.”

Ghostbusters II 1920

Ghostbusters Sitcom

See What Ghostbusters Would Look Like As an ’80s Sitcom

See what happens when Ghostbusters meets Charles in Charge.

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Have you ever wondered what Ghostbusters would be like if it was a little more like Bosom Buddies? Check out our video that reimagines the Ivan Reitman comedy classic as a 1980s sitcom straight out of the Who’s the Boss? and Growing Pains playbook. Ghostbusters with a peppy ’80s theme song is guaranteed to make you feel good.

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