DID YOU READ

Rian Johnson talks “Looper”, Bruce Willis’ voiceover, and “Breaking Bad”

Rian-Johnson

Posted by on

Rian Johnson may have been a critical darling with the release of his previous films, “Brick” and “The Brothers Bloom”, but with the Oscar buzz surrounding his “Looper” screenplay and the critical success of the film, the young director is about to become one of Hollywood’s hottest commodities. Starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Bruce Willis, and Emily Blunt, “Looper” is a poignant and heartfelt story wrapped up in a time-travel, science-fiction universe. It’s also one of the very best films of 2012.

Hot on the heels of the “Looper” Blu-ray and DVD release, Johnson sat down with IFC.com recently to chat about his most personal film, working with Bruce Willis, and the possibility of a return to “Breaking Bad”.

IFC: You’ve had critical success before with your first two films (“Brick” and “The Brothers Bloom”), but nothing on level of recognition and attention that “Looper” has received. Did you ever expect that type of reaction to the film? Did it feel any different making this one?

RIAN JOHNSON: That’s a good question. No, essentially you never expect anything. By the end of the process, you are just hoping that you’re not run out of town shamed on a rail, I guess. You go from these high hopes when you’re writing to just a desperate want of not making a complete fool of yourself by the end of it. So, no, there’s definitely never the expectation of “wow, this one is really going to get them.” You’re just always hoping that it works. In terms of it feeling different, it did, but I think maybe that’s the case with every new thing that you do. Hopefully with each thing that you do you’re learning something, you’re growing, and you’re pushing yourself a little harder in some way or another. So I think you’d be in real trouble if each new thing that you create didn’t feel like “Oh, wow. I feel like I’m doing something a little different this time.”

IFC: Of all your films so far, “Looper” feels the most personal. Is that the case? Does this one feel more personal to you than the others?

JOHNSON: I appreciate that. I think that’s a good sign. Again, yes, but with a qualified answer because it feels the most personal to me because it’s the most immediate to what’s on my mind right now and to my experience of what I’m going through. It’s the last thing I wrote. When I wrote “The Brothers Bloom,” that was where I was at that point, and the same thing for “Brick.” It’s really gratifying for me, though, to hear you say that because I think “Looper” has the veneer of an action movie, and of a time-travel movie, and there are a lot of things which one could very easily see and assume that it isn’t a very personal film. And, for me, it very definitely is so it makes me feel very good to hear that it struck you that way.

IFC: You’re talked previously about this “loop” of violence that manifests violence and how “Looper” was your way of addressing those issues. Other writers and directors might have just made a straight drama about this, but you chose to wrap it in this time-travel, sci-fi picture. Is that your way of dealing with heavy topics like that – to make it something interesting and accessible in other ways as well?

JOHNSON: Yeah, it is for me. You never want to make a “message movie,” but you always want to be talking about something that you care about, and talking about something that hopefully people can dig into and really relate to and that really matters. The thing about the movies that I grew up watching – the ones that really stick with me through my life – are movies that work on two different levels at the same time. They hit me on the gut level that a good genre picture can hit you on, but then have a lingering something that you keep chewing on after the credits roll. To me, that’s an incredibly powerful thing. I know, just in relation to sci-fi, that it’s something that sci-fi is specifically good at. Think about Ray Bradbury’s stories or Philip K. Dick. They’re writers that use these outlandish sci-fi concepts not to talk about, but to dramatize stuff that’s very vital and very human. To me, there’s nothing more powerful than that.

IFC: After all the “beef” you’ve had with Jason Reitman, how did it feel to read his essay in Entertainment Weekly?

JOHNSON: [Laughs] I guess I should make it completely clear that there was never any real beef with Jason. [Laughs] It’s funny that, because of that silly thing that I wrote, it’s led to my meeting Jason a couple of times and he’s really a great guy. That thing that he wrote just kind of blew my mind. I told Jason, and this is really true, that all this awards stuff is easy to get caught up in all the drama, but what it really just boils down to is your peers saying “good job” and appreciating your work, which just feels really good. In that way, reading the thing that Jason wrote felt like winning an Oscar to me. That was a really special thing.

IFC: Did you have any idea he was going to do that?

JOHNSON: No, no. He just emailed me out of the blue and said, “Hey, I’m doing this.” [Laughs] I was like, “Holy shit.” [Laughs]

IFC: Bruce Willis has said that “Looper” is probably his favorite film that he’s been in. We’ve all heard the “horror” stories from people like Kevin Smith about how hard Willis is to work with. How was it, for you, working with him? Were you nervous about that before you started filming?

JOHNSON: Well, you know, Bruce was definitely the biggest “movie star” that I’ve ever worked with. He’s so iconic. And, so, you’re always nervous when you’re showing up to work with one of your heroes, but he was a dream. He showed up ready to work. He was completely dedicated to the project. Besides just giving what I think is a tremendous performance, he also was so ready to dive into the darker elements of the script. He had no reservations at all and no ego. He had no interest in protecting any sort of movie star persona on the screen. He was just really down with digging into what this character needed to be. I had a fantastic time working with him. It was kind of like what your fantasy about working with Bruce Willis would be like. He was super cool.

IFC: Tell me how you approached him with this script. You basically have this film that says “We’re going to use makeup to turn Joseph into a younger version of you and he’s going to do this awesome impression of you as a younger guy.” That’s got to be a nerve-wracking conversation.

JOHNSON: It’s funny now that you say that. I’m thinking of our first meeting and we talked about the story and that was our first big connection point, but I don’t think we talked about that element of it. It was more about how we were going to approach the storytelling elements of it. In some way, it was probably a little bit of a surprise for Bruce when he showed up. He did hang out with Joe a few times though and let Joe watch him talk. He actually recorded all of Joe’s voiceover lines and sent the recordings to Joe so he could study how he said them.

IFC: That’s amazing.

JOHNSON: Yeah, it was really cool of him. And so, Joe has a recording somewhere on an iPod of Bruce saying those opening voiceover lines.

IFC: Could you imagine if he gave that to you to put online as an alternate audio track?

JOHNSON: That would be pretty incredible.

IFC: You’ve talked about your connection with Joseph plenty of times so I want to ask about Pierce. He’s amazing. Where did you find this kid and how quickly did you know he was just right for this part?

JOHNSON: We found him in Atlanta and the instant I saw the first words out of his mouth, on the first video audition that he did, I kind of leaned forward and said, “Oh.” Then when I met him and saw him work, and saw him do what he does, I was like, “Oh my God. We got really, really lucky here.” He’s an actor. If there’s something that feels different or amazing about his performance, I would attribute it to the fact that he’s not just saying the words in a practiced way. He’s not reciting them in a way that his mom has told him to recite them. He understands what the words mean and he’s saying them to the person who’s sitting across the table from him. He’s acting. As much as Emily and Joe and Bruce or anybody is acting, Pierce is just a great actor and he was five years old when we shot the movie. That combination is not something you see very often. We got really lucky.

People like to think that you have to trick kids into giving a performance, but there are kids out there that can act as well (and sometimes better) than adults. I feel like I’ve been lucky to work with some really good kid actors.

IFC: “Looper” has this kind of lo-tech, hi-tech approach to the future element, which I really love. It reminds me of films like “Brazil” and “Dark City” in a way. Did you watch any films, or show any films to your crew, before shooting as inspiration or reference for your film?

JOHNSON: No, not really. Just because I was very conscious of wanting the world to feel organic and not wanting it to feel like a pastiche of other sci-fi movies, we kind of took a different approach. And I love those films that you mentioned so much that I knew there was a danger in that even if we didn’t explicitly reference them. I wanted all the design decisions to be coming from what makes sense for the story and what makes sense for the script and the world. I wanted to intentionally avert our eyes from all the movies that we love, knowing that they would seep in there anyway. I think if you watch the movie, you can see echoes of “Blade Runner” and “Children of Men”, but I didn’t want to explicitly look to them. I didn’t want to overdue that element.

IFC: Is there any chance we’ll get to see you direct one of the final “Breaking Bad” episodes during the show’s upcoming, final run?

JOHNSON: [Laughs] Oh… [Laughs] Eh, I, um… I don’t know, man. We’ll see. [Laughs]

IFC: [Laughs] I’ll take that as a good sign that we may see you back! [Laughs] Other than that, do you have anything else coming up that fans can look forward to?

JOHNSON: No, I’m writing my next script right now. I’m writing another original and I’m a slow writer so I apologize that it’s taken a while, but that’s what I’m doing right now. Digging into the next one and hopefully I’ll get it done sooner rather than later and we’ll be off to the races.

Rian Johnson’s “Looper” is available on Blu-ray and DVD now.

Watch More
Tony-Hale-Joes-Pub-3

Holiday Extra Special

Make The Holidays ’80s Again

Enjoy the holiday cheer Wednesday December 21 at 10P on IFC.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Everett Collection

Whatever happened to the kind of crazy-yet-cozy holiday specials that blanketed the early winter airwaves of the 1980s? Unceremoniously killed by infectious ’90s jadedness? Slow fade out at the hands of early-onset millennial ennui? Whatever the reason, nixing the tradition was a huge mistake.

A huge mistake that we’re about to fix.

Announcing IFC’s Joe’s Pub Presents: A Holiday Special, starring Tony Hale. It’s a celeb-studded extravaganza in the glorious tradition of yesteryear featuring Bridget Everett, Jo Firestone, Nick Thune, Jen Kirkman, house band The Dap-Kings, and many more. And it’s at Joe’s Pub, everyone’s favorite home away from home in the Big Apple.

The yuletide cheer explodes Wednesday December 21 at 10P. But if you were born after 1989 and have no idea what void this spectacular special is going to fill, sample from this vintage selection of holiday hits:

Andy Williams and The NBC Kids Search For Santa

The quintessential holiday special. Get snuggly and turn off your brain. You won’t need it.

A Muppet Family Christmas

The Fraggles. The Muppets. The Sesame Street gang. Fate. The Jim Henson multiverse merges in this warm and fuzzy Holiday gathering.

Julie Andrews: The Sound Of Christmas

To this day a foolproof antidote to holiday cynicism. It’s cheesy, but a good cheese. In this case an Alpine Gruyère.

Star Wars Holiday Special

Okay, busted. This one was released in 1978. Still totally ’80s though. And yes that’s Bea Arthur.

Pee Wee’s Playhouse Christmas Special

Pass the eggnog, and make sure it’s loaded. This special is everything you’d expect it to be and much, much more.

Joe’s Pub Presents: A Holiday Special premieres Wednesday December 21 at 10P on IFC.

Watch More
CBB_519_tout_1

It Ain't Over Yet

A Guide to Coping with the End of Comedy Bang! Bang!

Watch the final episodes tonight at 11 and 11:30P on IFC.

Posted by on

After five seasons and 110 halved-hour episodes, Scott Aukerman’s hipster comedy opus, Comedy Bang! Bang!, has come to an end. Fridays at 11 and 11:30P will never be the same. We know it can be hard for fans to adjust after the series finale of their favorite TV show. That’s why we’ve prepared this step-by-step guide to managing your grief.

Step One: Cry it out

It’s just natural. We’re sad too.
Scott crying GIF

Step Two: Read the CB!B! IMDB Trivia Page

The show is over and it feels like you’ve lost a friend. But how well did you really know this friend? Head over to Comedy Bang! Bang!’s IMDB page to find out some things you may not have known…like that it’s “based on a Civil War battle of the same name” or that “Reggie Watts was actually born with the name Theodore Leopold The Third.”

Step Three: Listen to the podcast

One fascinating piece of CB!B! trivia that you might not learn from IMDB is that there’s a podcast that shares the same name as the TV show. It’s even hosted by Scott Aukerman! It’s not exactly like watching the TV show on a Friday night, but that’s only because each episode is released Monday morning. If you close your eyes, the podcast is just like watching the show with your eyes closed!

Step Four: Watch brand new CB!B! clips?!

The best way to cope with the end of Comedy Bang! Bang! is to completely ignore that it’s over — because it’s not. In an unprecedented move, IFC is opening up the bonus CB!B! content vault. There are four brand new, never-before-seen sketches featuring Scott Aukerman, Kid Cudi, and “Weird Al” Yankovic ready for you to view on the IFC App. There’s also one right here, below this paragraph! Watch all four b-b-bonus clips and feel better.

Binge the entire final season, plus exclusive sketches, right now on the IFC app.

Watch More
Watch-IFC

Everybody Sweats Now

The Four-Day Sweatsgiving Weekend On IFC

Posted by on

This long holiday weekend is your time to gobble gobble gobble and give heartfelt thanks—thanks for the comfort and forgiveness of sweatpants. Because when it comes right down to it, there’s nothing more wholesome and American than stuffing yourself stupid and spending endless hours in front of the TV in your softest of softests.

So get the sweats, grab the remote and join IFC for four perfect days of entertainment.

sweatsgiving
It all starts with a 24-hour T-day marathon of Rocky Horror Picture Show, then continues Friday with an all-day binge of Stan Against Evil.

By Saturday, the couch will have molded to your shape. Which is good, because you’ll be nestled in for back-to-back Die Hard and Lethal Weapon.

Finally, come Sunday it’s time to put the sweat back in your sweatpants with The Shining, The Exorcist, The Chronicles of Riddick, Terminator 2, and Blade: Trinity. They totally count as cardio.

As if you need more convincing, here’s Martha Wash and the IFC&C Music Factory to hammer the point home.

The Sweatsgiving Weekend starts Thursday on IFC

Watch More
Powered by ZergNet