“Silent Hill: Revelation 3D” cast explains why the video game adaptation works

Silent Hill Revelation 3D

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“Silent Hill: Revelation 3D” opens today and seemingly kicks off a new wave of video game movies. Movie studios are snapping video game properties up like crazy, so it will be interesting to see whether audiences embrace this new sequel from director Michael J. Bassett.

It’s been six years since “Silent Hill” first hit theaters, and that film offered up a slightly different take on the game while still staying true to its core horror theme. This time around, Bassett was brought on to both write and direct the project and it’s clear from talking to him that he’s a fan of the series.

“[It’s] so rich in mythology that there’s lots and lots of things to explore there, but more than anything it’s lie what’s the natural progression from a little girl’s story in the first movie to where we go with it,” he told IFC on the “Silent Hill: Revelation 3D” premiere red carpet. “What I loved is that this story is about a daughter, and the first movie is a mother trying to find her daughter, so I think there’s a sort of symmetry here.”

“Revelation” takes place about five or six years after the events of “Silent Hill” and is based on the “Silent Hill 3″ video game. In it, Heather (Adelaide Clemens), formerly known as Sharon in the first movie, must find her missing father (Sean Bean). Her quest draws her into the world of Silent Hill, where she must face off against such terrifying creatures as deformed nurses, Red Pyramid, and even her dark incarnation, Alessa.

Fans have recognized from the beginning how similar Clemens looks to Heather in the game, and that connection seems to be one of the strong points of the movie. It’s clear from that element that Bassett is doing his best to honor the “Silent Hill” series.

“I think that’s what got me the role,” Clemens told us. “Yeah, I look like the girl in the game.”

In the past, Clemens has recounted the way producer Samuel Hadida followed her around the 2011 Sundance Film Festival until she agreed to his movie. We asked him for his take on the story when we caught up with him at the premiere.

“I saw a young lady looking like one of the characters of the movie, like Heather, and I said, ‘She looks like Heather,'” Hadida said. “I just followed her and I said, ‘You see this [game] cover? It looks like that you are the same person of this cover, so I want you to come in LA and meet the director and try to see if you can be in the movie,’ and she says to me, ‘What’s happening? I don’t understand. What are you talking about?'”

He continued, “She was just looking [like Heather]. It’s like if you see the ghost of Silent Hill going to you, and I say maybe she’s going to bring me to somebody else. I was very excited.”

If Clemens’ Heather is very similar to the character in the game, then Kit Harington’s Vincent is the opposite. Bassett drastically changed who and why Vincent was in “Silent Hill: Revelation 3D” from his role in “Silent Hill 3,” to the point that Harington couldn’t talk about his role on the red carpet and was discouraged from playing the game at all.

“My lips are sealed. I can’t say much, but he’s a character who has a change of heart, and that’s all I can say. He was an interesting guy to play. He’s got a lot of secrets he has to hide throughout the film,” Harington teased. “It’s fair to say I didn’t [do research] because I was told not to by the director and because it differs, my character differs, so I was told not to play the game, which was a relief for me because I get scared in those things.”

It remains to be seen if fans will appreciate the movie, but it at least has one supporter: “Silent Hill” video game producer Tomm Hulett. He had already seen the film by the time we caught up with him, and it has received his stamp of approval.

“I think it does really well, actually,” he told IFC. “The first movie was a little different from the game, which is fine because it’s a movie, they can do their own thing, but this movie not just is a sequel to that but it also brings it back to the games a little bit too, so the really serious fans who kind of want it to be exactly like the game, they’ll find more in this movie that rings true to what they’re looking for, I think.”

At least fans can expect the 3D to be good. Bassett said that not a frame of the movie was post-converted because he feels it’s important to capture the depth 3D can film while you’re shooting a scene. Though he concedes that there are some drawbacks to using 3D, he has become a full-hearted fan of the medium.

“If you’re making a movie about other worlds, then 3D is a great way of engaging the audience in that world,” he said. “I think what it does bring is an otherworldliness, and it benefits a movie like ‘Silent Hill’ enormously.”

So what else should viewers look forward to? Clemens teased us with her two favorite elements of the film.

“I think the nurses are really cool, I think you’ll have fun there,” she said with a smile. “And Jon Snow’s there too, so it’s kind of amazing.”

“Silent Hill: Revelation 3D” is out in theaters today, October 26.

Are you intrigued by “Silent Hill: Revelation 3D”? Tell us in the comments section below or on Facebook and Twitter.

That 70s Show James Franco

That '70s Franco

Watch James Franco’s Geriatric That ’70s Show Spoof

Catch That '70s Show Mondays & Tuesdays 6-11P on IFC.

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Ever wonder if Jackie, Kelso, Fez, Donna, Hyde, and Eric ever made it out of Red‘s basement? According to James Franco, those dumbasses definitely did not.

In a new episode of AOL’s “Making a Scene with James Franco,” the actor peered into the future of the gang from That ’70s Show to see what they’d be up to if the show actually continued into their 70s. Turns out they’re still sitting around the basement, sharing a joint, and listening to some of the Steve Miller Band’s greatest hits.

In the sketch, aptly called “That 70s ’70s Show,” Franco plays both a stoned, elderly Kelso as well as a nostril-hair heavy Eric Forman. The only member of the crew who has made it out of the basement is Donna, who has sadly passed away into a higher plane of existence (yes, it’s possible for them to get higher) leaving Eric to mourn the loss of his one true love.

For more That ’70s Show, find out who almost played Red Forman and more fun facts.

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Doctor Feelgood

8 Hilarious Doctor Who Spoofs

Catch a Doctor Who Season 9 marathon Friday, November 6th starting at 6P ET/PT.

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Doctor Who is one of the most influential shows in all of spacetime.  Before you step into the TARDIS for IFC’s Doctor Who Season 9 marathon, check out some fantastic parodies and tributes to the Time Lord.

1. The Lenny Henry Doctor

UK comedian Lenny Henry spoofed the Doc way back in 1985. Starring alongside genuine Doctor companion Peri, it’s an ode to everything wonderful about the old series.

2. My (Re)Generation – Shooting Stars

Anarchic UK comedy quiz show Shooting Stars featured a music video by The (Doctor) Who, a band built from four versions of the eponymous character, with their hit song “My (Re)Generation” filmed in black and white inside an old TARDIS.

3. Doctor Who Anime

Fan-made anime “Space-Time Adventure DOCTOR WHO” is a labor of more love and skill that pays tribute to both the Doctor and anime tropes with equal measure. Paul “OtaKing” Johnson combined the Third Doctor with late-’80s style cyberpunk anime, crafting custom-made animations to turn a harvest of authentic quotes from the original series into all-new jokes. You gotta love the Doctor addressing a scantily clad anime protagonist with,”Oh for heaven’s sake girl, go and put something warm on.”

4. The Web of Caves

Part of the BBC’s “Doctor Who Night” in 1999, “The Web of Caves” was a work of love so intense it affected the future of the real series. The black-and-white parody of the early Doctor’s trials — complete with unbalanced audio, ill-considered evil plans and the eternal stone quarries — was co-written by and starred Mark Gatiss, who would go on to write several genuine Doctor Who episodes as well as appearing in the official series.

5. Kit Kat Daleks

Kit Kat’s “Take a Break” advert arrayed characters taking a break from their usual behavior. A needlepointing rugby player, classically violining metal-heads, and considerate sitcom husbands were flanked by Daleks charging through a shopping center with Hare Krishnas crying “PEACE-AND-LOVE! PEACE-AND-LOVE!” Their brief bliss-break was reduced even further when the rights-holders noticed that the Daleks were being used without permission. Because the only thing more terrifying than Daleks are lawyers.

6. Do You Have a License To Save This Planet?

As you can probably tell from their name, the BBV made a business of skating so close to BBC licensed properties.They had permission to make many spin-off productions, and they didn’t have official permission to make many more, but made them anyway. The most blatant was “Do You Have a License To Save This Planet?” starring Sylvester McCoy, but definitely legally not as the Seventh Doctor. No, he was the Foot Doctor, travelling time and space in a washing machine and fighting threats to the authorized canon in a half-hour adoring mockery of his own role.

7. The Five(ish) Doctors Reboot

To celebrate the “Day of the Doctor” 50th anniversary episode, past Doctors attempted to sneak onto the set to make their mark from the past. A gloriously self-aware comedy written and produced by the Fifth Doctor, and a must-watch for fans of the series.

8. The Curse of the Fatal Death

“The Curse of the Fatal Death” combined Doctor Who with the Comic Relief telethon, and the combination of classics with charity was anything a Whovian could have dreamed of. The multi-part mockery starred Rowan Atkinson, Richard E Grant, Hugh Grant, Jim Broadbent, and Joannna Lumley as regenerations of the world’s most famous time traveler.

Home for the Holidays

Pass the Dysfunction

10 Thanksgiving Movies to Be Thankful For

Gorge on IFC's four-day Sweatsgiving Marathon this Thanksgiving Day Weekend.

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Photo Credit: Everett Collection

There’s a movie for every holiday (well, maybe not Arbor Day), but Thanksgiving has more than its share. There’s something about a family coming together around an overloaded table that makes for gripping drama and hilarious comedy. Before you tuck into IFC’s Sweatsgiving marathon weekend, take a look at our picks for the best Turkey Day movies of all time. They’re far tastier than Aunt Bertha’s leftover three-bean casserole.

10. ThanksKilling

This ultra low-budget horror comedy about a killer Turkey is the perfect NSFW antidote to heartwarming holiday treacle. Fans of the film’s so-bad-its-good charms helped Kickstart a sequel, ThanksKilling 3. What happened to ThanksKilling 2? Guess the killer turkey ate the print.

9. The Ice Storm

Key parties, family secrets and Nixon masks all converge in one particularly eventful Thanksgiving weekend in Ang Lee’s searing look at dysfunctional families in the turbulent days of the early ’70s. And you thought your post-dinner family games of Trivial Pursuit were tense.

8. Pieces of April

Katie Holmes broke free from her teen drama roots with this indie flick about a young urban misfit who invites her straight-laced suburban family to a big city Thanksgiving dinner. An underrated comedy about the importance of families (be they urban or biological) that also answers the age-old holiday question: canned or fresh cranberry sauce?

7. Tadpole

What is it with Thanksgiving and quasi-incest comedies? 2002’s Tadpole tells the tale of Oscar Grubman, a hyper-intelligent high school boy who has a crippling crush on his stepmother. When he goes home for Thanksgiving, this Oedipal nightmare gets transferred onto a horny cougar chiropractor, and things rapidly spin out of control. A general rule of thumb for the holidays: keep it in your pants, particularly when family is involved.

6. Scent Of A Woman

Al Pacino comes dangerously close to the edge of self-parody in his iconic role as blind ex-Army Ranger Frank Slade, but also scored a Best Actor win in the process. Chris O’Donnell plays the college student who is hired to take care of Slade over Thanksgiving break and finds himself dragged along on an adventure that includes a stop by his brother’s house for a Turkey Day dinner that goes wildly out of control. Hoo-hah! Pass the gravy.

5. The House Of Yes

This psychologically twisted 1997 black comedy helped make Parker Posey a star. She plays “Jackie-O” Pascal, a mentally disturbed young woman who joins her family at their ritzy Virginia estate for Thanksgiving. As a hurricane bears down on the area, Jackie proceeds to go further and further off the rails, capped off by an incestuous encounter with her own brother while they role-play the JFK assassination. With a strong cast and a wickedly sharp script, The House of Yes goes down like a slice of pumpkin pie with a whiskey chaser.

4. The War At Home

This underrated 1996 drama tackled some pretty tough subjects. Jeremy Collier (played by Emilio Estevez, who also directed) is a Vietnam vet back home and dealing with PTSD. Martin Sheen plays his dad, who doesn’t understand that his son came back a little changed. It all comes to a head at the family’s Thanksgiving dinner, where Jeremy pulls a gun on his dad because he wouldn’t loan him the cash he needed to flee the draft. The fact that Estevez and Sheen are father and son in real life only adds to the film’s dramatic tension.

3. Home for the Holidays

Few films capture the mix of dysfunction and warmth that comes with Thanksgiving better than Jodie Foster’s 1995 comedy. Holly Hunter and Robert Downey, Jr. are perfectly cast as a brother and sister weathering uptight siblings, kooky aunts and other family drama with sharp humor and lump-in-your throat tearful moments. We’re not crying. Mom must be cooking her famous onion soup.

2. Hannah and Her Sisters

Widely considered one of the best films in Woody Allen’s vast filmography, Hannah and Her Sisters charts the lives of three very different sisters over the course of three separate Thanksgivings. The holiday serves as a backdrop that reminds us of the ties that bind and also tear us down.

1. Planes, Trains And Automobiles

No movie captures the ups and downs of Thanksgiving quite like this John Hughes classic. Steve Martin plays Neal Page, a high-strung marketing suit who gets paired with John Candy’s slobby salesman Del Griffith as they both try to get back to Chicago in time for the holiday. Hughes was a master of tapping into some very American emotions, and the movie’s climax — where (spoiler alert!) Neal realizes Del has nowhere to go and invites him to come to dinner with his family — is a touching moment that in lesser hands would come off as maudlin.


Award Winners

Fred Armisen and Bill Hader to Receive American Ingenuity Award

Smithsonian Magazine honors Documentary Now!

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During its inspirational 50th season, Documentary Now! earned our undying love and support. Now it’s earning awards, too. The show’s creators and stars, Bill Hader and Fred Armisen, have won Smithsonian Magazine‘s American Ingenuity Award for the Performing Arts this year. Senator Al Franken will present the duo with the award in a ceremony on Thursday, Nov. 12th. No word on whether Blue Jean Committee will perform.

In addition to the award, Bill and Fred received another honor—the chance to get their mugs on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine‘s December issue. Looking good, guys. And for more Documentary Now!, check out the archives, music and full episodes.

Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine

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