“Avatar” sequels to begin filming in 2013


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The sequels for “Avatar” are still a long ways off, but they could begin filming within the next year. James Cameron hit “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” red carpet in New Zealand Wednesday and revealed that he plans to have the scripts for “Avatar 2″ and “3” done by February and then start shooting the movies back-to-back by the end of 2013.

“I want to get these scripts nailed down, I don’t want to be writing the movie in post production,” he told The West Australian. “We kind of did that on the first picture, I ended up cutting out a lot of scenes and so on and I don’t want to do that again.”

That seemingly aligns with 20th Century Fox’s plan to have “Avatar 2″ come out in December 2014 and then “3” hit theaters on December 2015. It depends how long it takes for Cameron to film the movies and whether there are any more delays, but it seems like we could have the next two chapters of the “Avatar” saga out within the next three years.

Cameron also discussed the use of 48 frames per second film technology in his new movies. He said he’s waiting to see the response to the higher frame rate in “The Hobbit” before he commits to using that technology in “Avatar 2″ and “3.”

“If there is acceptance of 48 (FPS), then that will pave the way for Avatar (sequels) to take advantage of it,” he said.

It should go without saying that the films will be released in 3D like their predecessor.

What are you hoping to see in “Avatar 2″ and “3”? Tell us in the comments section below or on Facebook and Twitter.

That 70s Show Fez

Fez Fever!

Think You Know Fez? Take This Quiz!

Catch That '70s Show Mondays and Tuesdays from 6-11P ET/PT.

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Fez played the role of the outsider on That ’70s Show, but was quickly welcomed into the Circle. How deeply have you accepted Fez into your life? Click below to start the quiz and find out!


Kurtwood Smith 1920

That '70s Mofo

5 Movies That Prove Kurtwood Smith Is a National Treasure

Catch Kurtwood Smith on That '70s Show airing now on IFC.

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Believe it or not, veteran character actor Kurtwood Smith has a warm, endearing smile. It just took audiences over a decade to actually see him in a role that didn’t focus on his ability to scare children with his villainous gaze and determined grin. Thanks to That ’70s Show, we now associate him most as Red Forman, the curmudgeonly but loveable father to Eric Forman and patriarch to the gang of burnouts who hung out in his basement. Smith has had a long career of playing characters that weren’t always as soft and cuddly as Red Forman. Here are five of the most memorable Kurtwood Smith roles in which he didn’t have to hilariously teach a “foreign kid” to stop saying “Amedica.”

1. Flashpoint (1984)

Flashpoint may be a forgotten thriller from 1984 starring Kris Kristofferson and Treat Williams as border cops who find a dead body and a ton of cash, but Kurtwood Smith shines in a role as a crooked federal agent. This character is as sinister a son-of-a-bitch as they come, with contempt practically oozing out from his eyes. You are more likely to find a VHS copy of Flashpoint at a random flea market than catch it on Netflix, but take a look at just how good he is at being a bad guy as he delivers a John Malkovich-level performance.

2. Robocop (1987)

Clarence Boddiker, the villain Smith played in Robocop, is still remembered fondly by sci-fi fans for the Jack Nicholson-like glee that he displayed for causing mayhem and inflicting pain. Any scene that has Kurtwood Smith entering a room delivering the line “B–ches leave!,” and ends with him pulling a grenade pin out with his mouth, then killing a coked-up ‘80s yuppie, will surely elevate a film’s cult status.

3. Dead Poets Society (1989)

Red Forman might have had a hard time expressing outward displays of affection for his son Eric, but compared to Mr. Perry in Dead Poets Society, he’s a regular Phil Dunphy. To say this character was chilling is an understatement. Smith nailed the cold detachment of a father determined to make his son live the life he was being groomed for. If you haven’t seen Dead Poets Society, in the words of Red Forman, what are you waiting for, “dumbass”???

4. Citizen Ruth (1996)

Smith got the chance to act in Alexander Payne’s first movie, a dark comedy in which Laura Dern’s Ruth plays a poor pregnant woman who likes to huff paint and gets mixed up with both sides of the abortion debate. Norm Stoney (Smith) and his wife enjoy nothing more on a beautiful day than to take the kids down to the free clinic, scarf a box of donuts and shout “murderer” at the people entering the building. A still relevant satire, the film gave Smith the chance to display his comedic chops before That ’70s Show. Though we doubt that Red would’ve let a “dirty hippy” like Ruth stay in his home.

5. True Believer (1989)

Smith shines as a no-nonsense prosecutor in this underrated crime thriller where James Woods and Robert Downey Jr. attempt to defend a man wrongfully accused of a gang murder.

Carrie Brownstein Colbert

Carrie Goes Folk

Carrie Brownstein Debuted Her New Somber Folk Song on Colbert

Hear Carrie's new sound.

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Carrie Brownstein stopped by The Late Show last night to talk to Stephen Colbert about Portlandia, Sleater-Kinney and, of course, her new memoir, Hunger Makes Me A Modern Girl, which is in stores now.

While she was waiting in the show’s green room, she announced her new career path as an interpreter of traditional English folk ballads.

After her very somber performance, Carrie sat down with Colbert to discuss whether or not she is “cool.” Oh, Carrie. If you’re not cool, there is zero hope for the rest of us.


Do You Know Jackie?

Test Your Knowledge on All Things Jackie

Take the Jackie quiz, That '70s fans!

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Jackie is the spoiled little rich girl of That ’70s Show, which doesn’t stop her from being right a little more often than her friends might like. But how many right answers will you get in our quiz that’s all about the motormouth of the That ’70s Show gang? Find out below.


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