DID YOU READ

Tim Grierson on the Frustrations of Being a Kevin James Fan

101512-kevin-james

Posted by on

This past weekend, the comedy “Here Comes the Boom” was a critical and commercial disappointment, receiving generally dismissive reviews and ending up a lowly No. 5 at the box office. The poor notices weren’t a surprise, but the poor grosses were. “Here Comes the Boom” is the latest vehicle for Kevin James, who in the last few years has established himself as an emerging star. Lovable and sweet where other comics are hip or crass, James has carved out a niche for himself as a likable everyman. I’ve enjoyed him in just about everything he’s done on film and in television. Unfortunately, I’ve almost never enjoyed the projects themselves.

James grew up in Long Island and first made his name as a standup, making observational humor that often poked fun at his own foibles. His persona was that of a well-meaning doofus, an image that was enhanced by his plus-size figure and soft features. This regular-guy demeanor soon translated into a recurring role on his friend Ray Romano’s sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond.” And from there, James got his own show, “The King of Queens,” which transplanted his “Raymond” character Doug Heffernan into its own universe.

Though the show ran for nine seasons, “The King of Queens” was never much of a critical favorite. (It received exactly one Emmy nomination, for James for Outstanding Lead Actor.) And while it was certainly a formulaic sitcom — even casting Jerry Stiller, who had been part of the “Seinfeld” juggernaut, as James’s Frank Constanza-like father-in-law — it was boosted by its star’s utter naturalness as a working-class delivery driver. At a time when so-called “blue-collar comedy” in the form of Jeff Foxworthy and Larry the Cable Guy was playing into cultural stereotypes and parading its redneck bona fides, Doug didn’t seem to have a political agenda: He was just a nice guy who loved football and got annoyed by the same things we all do.

And while “The King of Queens” definitely followed the formula of pairing an average-looking comic with an impossibly beautiful wife, James’s show shook things up a little by having Doug’s wife (Leah Remini) not be the calm, rational one who had to put up with her husband’s crazy schemes. Instead, she was often the ambitious, irritable one that he had to calm down, creating a good-cop dynamic that James would continue to exploit when he transitioned into film.

By 2005, he had already appeared in Adam Sandler’s “50 First Dates,” but it was in “Hitch” where he first showed his potential as a film actor. Perhaps importantly, he wasn’t the lead, instead playing the charming, understated second fiddle to Will Smith’s charismatic, cocky love doctor. By comparison, James was a mild-mannered executive trying to woo the gorgeous Amber Valletta. In real life, a guy as timid as James would never land such a beauty, but his innate sweetness made this proposition, at least in the fluffy world of romantic comedies, at least seem plausible. “Hitch” wasn’t much of a movie, but James was a charmer.

Afterward, James moved on to “I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry,” where he co-starred with Sandler. As on “The King of Queens,” he was the nice guy in contrast to Sandler’s homophobic, babe-hound character, playing a kind-hearted widower who just wants to take care of his two kids. Whether you thought “Chuck and Larry” was a groundbreaking commentary on gay relationships or just a crude Sandler comedy, James’s character’s undeniable decency gave the movie its emotional center.

With James now firmly entrenched in the Sandler camp, I was hoping he would be able to do better as a leading man than other Sandler pals like Rob Schneider and David Spade had fared. Unfortunately, his first starring role, 2009’s “Paul Blart: Mall Cop,” was an utter abomination — the sort of juvenile, lowest-common-denominator misfire that movie studios dump in January that they just want off their slate. I assumed it would bomb and would hamper James’s career. Shows you how good my box-office prognostication skills are: “Paul Blart” was a huge hit, winning two straight weekends and ending up with more than $146 million. James co-wrote “Paul Blart,” but the “Die Hard”-in-a-mall premise didn’t do enough to emphasize his sweetness or his sneaky slightly-skewed-ordinary-guy essence. As someone who had been a fan of his for a while, I suppose I was happy for James’s success, but, seriously, the endless fat-guy jokes of “Paul Blart” didn’t make me optimistic about his future.

My attitude didn’t change with subsequent films. In “Grown Ups,” “The Dilemma,” and “Zookeeper,” it’s been more of the same, with James’s likable presence overshadowed by broader, louder costars or, in the case of “Zookeeper,” by talking animals voiced by the likes of Sandler, Cher and Sylvester Stallone. The reviews for “Zookeeper,” his second solo starring vehicle, were just as brutal as they were for “Paul Blart,” but the movie made about half as much money, perhaps a signal that audiences were tiring of James. I could understand: The modest charm of his earlier roles had calcified into a nice-guy shtick that wasn’t nearly as enjoyable when it was forced to shoulder the burden of miserable dreck all by itself.

That’s why I’m most disappointed with the lukewarm returns for “Here Comes the Boom.” While it’s not a film I’d recommend, it’s the first time James has been the leading man in a movie that clearly plays to his strengths. As with “Paul Blart” and “Zookeeper,” he co-wrote “Here Comes the Boom,” and he’s hit upon a timely premise. Scott Voss (James) was once a dedicated high school teacher who has grown complacent and lazy over time. But when an older teacher (Henry Winkler) whom he admires discovers that his music program is going to be cut due to budget restraints, Scott decides to become an MMA wrestler to win enough money to save the program.

James has always poked fun at his own beefiness, which has made his surprisingly graceful moves all the more delightful. (The highlight of “Hitch” is probably watching James dance.) “Here Comes the Boom” utilizes this juxtaposition to good effect as Scott convincingly goes toe-to-toe with professional MMA fighters: He’s big enough but also swift enough to play the part. And while the movie is a paint-by-numbers sports film, James knows how to be lovable without seeming needy or cloying about it. Like too many of the movies he’s associated with, though, “Here Comes the Boom” is only tolerable because of his presence, and you wonder if he’s not ambitious enough to do better or if he’s happy starring in mediocre Hollywood product. I still think the guy’s got potential — but sometimes I’m not sure if he sees that potential in himself.

The-Craft

The ’90s Are Back

The '90s live again during IFC's weekend marathon.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Everett Digital, Columbia Pictures

We know what you’re thinking: “Why on Earth would anyone want to reanimate the decade that gave us Haddaway, Los Del Rio, and Smash Mouth, not to mention Crystal Pepsi?”

via GIPHY

Thoughts like those are normal. After all, we tend to remember lasting psychological trauma more vividly than fleeting joy. But if you dig deep, you’ll rediscover that the ’90s gave us so much to fondly revisit. Consider the four pillars of true ’90s culture.

Boy Bands

We all pretended to hate them, but watch us come alive at a karaoke bar when “I Want It That Way” comes on. Arguably more influential than Brit Pop and Grunge put together, because hello – Justin Timberlake. He’s a legitimate cultural gem.

Man-Child Movies

Adam Sandler is just behind The Simpsons in terms of his influence on humor. Somehow his man-child schtick didn’t get old until the aughts, and his success in that arena ushered in a wave of other man-child movies from fellow ’90s comedians. RIP Chris Farley (and WTF Rob Schneider).

via GIPHY

via GIPHY

Teen Angst

In horror, dramas, comedies, and everything in between: Troubled teens! Getting into trouble! Who couldn’t relate to their First World problems, plaid flannels, and lose grasp of the internet?

Mainstream Nihilism

From the Coen Bros to Fincher to Tarantino, filmmakers on the verge of explosive popularity seemed interested in one thing: mind f*cking their audiences by putting characters in situations (and plot lines) beyond anyone’s control.

Feeling better about that walk down memory lane? Good. Enjoy the revival.

via GIPHY

And revisit some important ’90s classics all this weekend during IFC’s ’90s Marathon. Check out the full schedule here.

PL_409_MPX-1920×1080

Get Physical

DVDs are the new Vinyl

Portlandia Season 7 Now Available On Disc.

Posted by on
GIFs via Giffy

In this crazy digital age, sometimes all we really want is to reach out and touch something. Maybe that’s why so many of us are still gung-ho about owning stuff on DVD. It’s tangible. It’s real. It’s tech from a bygone era that still feels relevant, yet also kitschy and retro. It’s basically vinyl for people born after 1990.

via GIPHY

Inevitably we all have that friend whose love of the disc is so absolutely repellent that he makes the technology less appealing. “The resolution, man. The colors. You can’t get latitude like that on a download.” Go to hell, Tim.

Yes, Tim sucks, and you don’t want to be like Tim, but maybe he’s onto something and DVD is still the future. Here are some benefits that go beyond touch.

It’s Decor and Decorum

With DVDs and a handsome bookshelf you can show off your great taste in film and television without showing off your search history. Good for first dates, dinner parties, family reunions, etc.

via GIPHY

Forget Public Wifi

Warm up that optical drive. No more awkwardly streaming episodes on shady free wifi!

via GIPHY

Inter-not

Internet service goes down. It happens all the time. It could happen right now. Then what? Without a DVD on hand you’ll be forced to make eye contact with your friends and family. Or worse – conversation.

via GIPHY

Self Defense

You can’t throw a download like a ninja star. Think about it.

via GIPHY

If you’d like to experience the benefits DVD ownership yourself, Portlandia Season 7 is now available on DVD and Blue-Ray.

SAE SDCC 2017

SDCC OMG

Stan Diego Comic-Con

Stan Against Evil returns November 1st.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Erin Resnick, GIFs via Giphy

Another Comic-Con International is in the can, and multiple nerdgasms were had by all – not least of which were about the Stan Against Evil roundtable discussion. Dana, Janet and John dropped a whole lotta information on what’s to come in Season 2 and what it’s like to get covered in buckets of demon goo. Here are the highlights.

Premiere Date!

Season 2 hits the air November 1 and picks up right where things left off. Consider this your chance to seamlessly continue your Halloween binge.

Character Deets!

Most people know that Evie was written especially for Janet, but did you know that Stan is based on Dana Gould’s dad? It’s true. But that’s where the homage ends, because McGinley was taken off the leash to really build a unique character.

Happy Accidents!

Improv is apparently everything, because according to Gould the funniest material happens on the fly. We bet the writers are totally cool with it.

Exposed Roots!

If Stan fans are also into Twin Peaks and Doctor Who, that’s no accident. Both of those cult classic genre benders were front of mind when Stan was being developed.

Trailer Treasure!

Yep. A new trailer dropped. Feast your eyes.

Catch up on Stan Against Evil’s first season on the IFC app before it returns November 1st on IFC.