How “Little Shop of Horrors” got its ending back

little shop of horrors

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“Little Shop Of Horrors: The Director’s Cut” hits shelves today, and for those involved with assembling this version of the 1986 big-screen musical, the task amounted to more than just cutting and pasting a few archived scenes and adding the original, 20-minute ending that was scrapped after test audiences found it too dark and depressing. In many ways, the process of restoring the initial ending for the film — in which an army of monstrous alien plants destroys the nation’s largest cities — was an archeological quest of cinematic proportions, complete with missing frames scattered around the world, some creative editing of existing material, and the chance to right a few wrongs that left key figures in the film’s development out of the picture until now.

Leading the charge to give “Little Shop Of Horrors” the director’s cut it deserved was Kurt Galvao, Warner Bros. Pictures’ Vice President of Assets & Technology/Post Production, whose work on 2007’s “Final Cut” edition of Ridley Scott’s “Blade Runner” earned high praise from fans and stands out as one of the most highly praised (both for its content and quality) versions of the sic-fi classic to date.

During a recent press junket for the Blu-ray release of the “Little Shop” director’s cut, IFC spoke with Galvao and director Frank Oz about the painstaking process of giving the world the ending the film should’ve had from the start.

“The most important thing was not to draw people away from the story because of the new ending,” Galvao told IFC. “Going into this, I knew it had to have the same amount of grain and the same warmth, color-wise. And I wanted to make sure, sound-wise, that it sounded the same [as the rest of the movie] and just… flowed. To achieve that, first we had to find the parts of each of the original pieces.”

And this was no small task, according to Galvao, whose team found themselves digging through piles of reels in Los Angeles, London, and Kansas in order to locate the missing film. With much of the film initially shot in London, the masters stored in L.A., and a massive vault of reels archived in Kansas (in order to protect the material from earthquakes), pulling everything together quickly became a globe-hopping endeavor.

Finally, on top of any logistical concerns, the rushed re-shoot of the film’s ending more than two decades ago left elements like the music, sound, and portions of the footage that would’ve been tweaked before release painfully incomplete.

“I started searching at Warner Bros., obviously, and from there to the deep mines of Kansas where there were some films, and followed the paperwork trail to London,” laughed Galvao.

“It was difficult finding all the pieces,” he said. “They weren’t where the boxes said they were, but we went through every piece, and I had guys on boxes for weeks looking at every frame. It took about a year and a half to pull it all together. And then on the sound side, we had to locate the original track of singing, get the original tracks in there, and find the dialogue tracks from the dailies. Some of them had damage, so we had to filter out the damage in some cases.”

Along with filtering out some of the negative effects of time, Galvao and his team were also called upon to add upon the existing material — a task that was actually made easier by the 26 years that had elapsed since the film’s premiere.

“We’re lucky to be in a digital world where we can scan the original negatives and have that as our base, then find all of the other elements of the other parts and recreate what they were originally trying to finish,” explained Galvao. “That included a lot of the optical effects, but back then the visual effects were all optically based. They didn’t have digital effects. So what I tried to do with our team was to stick with using all those frames of optical effects at whatever extent they were finished at, and then finish them digitally. But we always had to keep that look from the optical effects. We didn’t want it to be squeaky clean, so we actually had to add some grain here and there.”

Restoring the ending for “Little Shop Of Horrors” also gave Galvao and Oz the opportunity to see some of their favorite elements from the original finale returned to their proper place in the film. Oz told IFC he was particularly happy to give model designer Richard Conway a call to let him know that the massive amount of miniatures he had created — and subsequently destroyed — for the final montage of plants conquering the world would finally get its time in the spotlight.

For Galvao, one of the highlights of the restoration process was putting actor Paul Dooley back into the film. In the original ending for “Little Shop,” Dooley appears as a businessman who tells Seymour (Rick Moranis) that, thanks to some cuttings he took from the plant, his company has plans to mass-market “Audrey II” seedlings and make it the next big thing to fly off the shelves. This is followed by scenes of shoppers buying up the plants all around the country, which then leads into the destruction they cause around the world.

When the call came down for re-shoots, Dooley wasn’t available to film new scenes, and James Belushi was swapped in for Dooley’s role. Dooley was later given a “Special Thanks” in the credits, but never appeared in the theatrical version of the film.

“One thing that was really, really great was finding the piece with Paul Dooley and putting it back in there,” said Galvao.

For Galvao, when it comes to these restoration projects, the task of piecing everything back together is more than just a job — it’s personal.

“It becomes my baby, too,” he laughed. “I know Frank is the genius and the one who created it, but when I take one of these on, it’s my child. It’s a labor of love doing one of these, just like it is originally creating it. I just can’t stand seeings something that was slapped together put out there, so I like getting it down to the exact way it was meant to be and then making it as pretty as possible.”

“Little Shop Of Horrors: The Director’s Cut” is available now on Blu-ray. Make sure to checkout our extended interview with director Frank Oz and star Ellen Greene here on IFC.com.

Donna That 70s Show

Donna Rules

Love Donna From That ’70s Show? Take the Quiz!

Catch That '70s Show Mons & Tues 6-11P on IFC.

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Photo credit: 20th Century Fox TV

Donna is the strongest (and probably the smartest) member of the That ’70s Show gang. But how well do you know the sassy redhead? Take the ultimate Donna fan quiz and find out!


Gigi Does It Ice Skating

Gigi's Ready, Are You?

5 Ways to Get Ready for Tonight’s Gigi Does It

Catch Gigi Does It Mondays at 10:30P on IFC.

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Garfield might hate Mondays, but now that Gigi Does It is in its new time slot Mondays at 10:30P ET/PT, it’s your new favorite day of the week. Here are five ways you can get ready for tonight’s all-new episode.

1. Watch David Krumholtz Become Gigi

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Wondering how David Krumholtz transforms into Gigi? Check out a video time lapse to see the incredible work that goes on behind-the-scenes of Gigi Does It.

2. Get in Touch With Your Inner Kristy Yamatushy

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This week Gigi and Ricky hit the ice. Will they fall flat or soar like Olympic great Kristy Yamtushy?

3. See the Video That’s Too Hot for Facebook

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Gigi has a filthy mouth that is NSFW and Not Safe for Facebook. Check out the video Mark Zuckerberg doesn’t want you to see.

4. Read Gigi’s Book “Call Your Grandmother”

Call Your Grandmother

Gigi became an author recently when she self-published her heartwarming children’s book about the perils of forgetting to call your dear grandma. Read the story that could give Go the F**k to Sleep a run for its money on the bestseller charts.

5. Put on Something that Highlights Your Kishkes

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You’ll want to slip into something comfortable when you watch Gigi. Just ask poor Ricky.

That 70s Show Thanksgiving episode

Turkey Day Laughs

The 10 Best Thanksgiving Sitcom Episodes

Catch That '70s Show all Thanksgiving Day during IFC's Sweatsgiving Marathon.

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Whether it’s the Connor family on Roseanne or the family of friends on That ’70s Show, there’s no holiday that brings out the comedy in dysfunctional families like Thanksgiving. Before you dig into IFC’s Thanksgiving Day That ’70s Show marathon, check out the 10 best sitcom episodes stuffed full of turkey, laughs and tears.

10. Family Ties, “No Nukes is Good Nukes”

Thanksgiving is ruined at the Keaton household, and for once you can’t blame Alex because it’s his parents Steven and Elyse who get thrown in jail for protesting a nuclear power plant. Unlike his do-gooder, aging hippie parents, the only thing Alex P. Keaton would ever protest is term limits on Ronald Reagan’s presidency.

9. Modern Family, “Punkin Chunkin”

Modern Family Pumpkin


It’s Thanksgiving time, and the intertwined families of Modern Family all have their own squabbles going on. This episode culminates at a football field with a classic Modern Family ending when Jay, Mitchell and Claire doubt that their partners, the self-proclaimed dreamers, can launch a pumpkin through a goal post.

8. Seinfeld, “The Mom and Pop Store”

If this Seinfeld outing was a Friends episode, it would be titled “The One with Jon Voight’s car,” because that is the hilarious storyline that everyone remembers. The Turkey Day plotline revolves around the gang attending Tim Whatley’s pre-Thanksgiving party which happens to overlook the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Any appearance by Bryan Cranston as Tim Whatley is pretty memorable, and in this one he reveals to George who the real Jon (John) Voight is.

7. That ’70s Show, “Thanksgiving”

Kelso Thanksgiving

In the season one Thanksgiving episode of That ’70s Show, the Formans (especially Kitty) dread the arrival of Red’s mother. Laurie returns from college and brings her attractive friend Kate along, who flirts with Eric. The episode creates a classic Eric Forman dilemma as he kisses Kate and then tells Donna. Eric does get another valuable life lesson when he learns that bad things happen to him not because of rotten luck but because he’s, as Red so aptly puts it, a “dumbass.”

6. Roseanne, “Thanksgiving 1991″

Few sitcoms captured the stress of holiday get-togethers like Roseanne, and “Thanksgiving 1991″ has all the family drama and hilarious moments that fans love about the show. Roseanne’s mother Bev reveals that her husband Al has been unfaithful. Darlene is being her usual moody-but-loveable self and stays in her room while D.J. sits adorably alone at the kids table. The appearance of Roseanne’s grandmother Nana Mary, played with crotchety glee by Shelley Winters, makes this episode an instant classic.

5. The League, “Thanksgiving”

In what has to be one of the most brilliant casting choices in TV history, Jeff Goldblum in all his Goldblum glory plays Ruxin’s dad in this hilarious Thanksgiving episode. Sarah Silverman’s appearance as Andre’s promiscuous sister is the icing on the raunchy cake as the guys walk in on Goldblum right before he gives his “vinegar stroke” face. The moment is simultaneously disgusting and hilarious as Goldblum’s look of ecstasy is eerily identical to Ruxin’s look of disgust.

4. WKRP in Cincinnati, “Turkey’s Away”

If you’re old enough to have watched WKRP In Cincinnati, the first thing you probably remember is the catchy opening theme song (and rockin’ closing credits song). But when it comes to remembering an episode, it might be the only sitcom where every fan thinks of the Thanksgiving installment first. This is the show that taught the world in hilarious fashion that turkeys can’t fly, especially when dropped from a helicopter.

3. Cheers, “Thanksgiving Orphans”

A potluck dinner at Carla’s house sets up one of TV’s most famous food fights. This classic moment shows off the gang’s camaraderie in a simultaneous moment of silliness and reflection as they remember the loss of Coach, played by Nicholas Colasanto, who died the year before. The episode also contains the closest thing the audience gets to seeing Norm’s wife Vera, which make the episode even more memorable.

2. Friends, “The One With The Thanksgiving Flashbacks”

“The One With The Thanksgiving Flashbacks” is the Friends flashback episode fans had been waiting for ever since Ross was revealed to be Rachel’s “lobster.” Except in this episode, Monica is Chandler’s turkey in an adorable scene. It’s also the one where we learn why Monica got thin, the one where we find out that Chandler and Ross were way too into Miami Vice and the one where Chandler lost a toe. This episode would’ve been hilarious just for Ross’ “Mr. Kotter” ’80s look alone.

1. How I Met Your Mother, “Slapsgiving”

While the Friends creators obviously loved the fun of Thanksgiving episodes, the How I Met Your Mother writers took it to the next level with the “Slapsgiving” episodes. Slapsgiving was so beloved by fans, it became an epic holiday trilogy. The beloved Slapbet originated in the episode where Robin Sparkles is brought to glorious life, and it continues in “Slapsgiving” as Robin and Ted deal with trying to stay friends during the Thanksgiving following their breakup. Unlike the divisive series finale, Marshall’s Slapsgiving slap of Barney is a “legen (wait for it) dary” moment in the show’s history. If you’ve never seen Marshall’s “You Just Got Slapped” video, you’re in for a Thanksgiving treat.


Two for None

Watch Free Episodes of Benders and Gigi Does It Right Now

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The 50th season of Documentary Now! is drawing to a close tonight starting at 10P with the tale of friends, falsettos, and feathered hair, “Gentle & Soft: The Story of the Blue Jean Committee.” After the moving finale, stay tuned for special sneak peeks of your two favorite new shows Benders and Gigi Does It. Or if you can’t wait, you can watch them RIGHT NOW below.

Watch an episode of Benders

Watch an episode of Gigi Does It

Crack open a cold one with a sneak peek of the Benders premiere at 11P —it’s what the hockey loving team members of Uncle Chubbys would do! This band of friends loves drinking beer and playing hockey, but they’re really only good at one of those things.

Then starting at 11:30P, get to know Gigi Does It, the new show starring David Krumholtz as a grandma who gets her groove back. Gertrude Rotblum, a.k.a. “Gigi,” may have lost her beloved husband, but she gained a new lease on life thanks to a secret bank account filled with millions. With her trusty sidekick in tow, Gigi is ready to take on the world, one buzzword, politician, and naked art class at a time.

In addition to YouTube and right here on IFC.com, an episode each of Benders and Gigi Does It can be seen on VOD and TV Everywhere platforms through IFC’s cable partners.

Early looks got you hooked? Then be sure to catch the new seasons of Benders and Gigi Does It when they premiere on IFC starting Thursday, October 1 at 10P and 10:30P, respectively. It’s like Christmas in early October!

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