DID YOU READ

How “Little Shop of Horrors” got its ending back

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“Little Shop Of Horrors: The Director’s Cut” hits shelves today, and for those involved with assembling this version of the 1986 big-screen musical, the task amounted to more than just cutting and pasting a few archived scenes and adding the original, 20-minute ending that was scrapped after test audiences found it too dark and depressing. In many ways, the process of restoring the initial ending for the film — in which an army of monstrous alien plants destroys the nation’s largest cities — was an archeological quest of cinematic proportions, complete with missing frames scattered around the world, some creative editing of existing material, and the chance to right a few wrongs that left key figures in the film’s development out of the picture until now.

Leading the charge to give “Little Shop Of Horrors” the director’s cut it deserved was Kurt Galvao, Warner Bros. Pictures’ Vice President of Assets & Technology/Post Production, whose work on 2007’s “Final Cut” edition of Ridley Scott’s “Blade Runner” earned high praise from fans and stands out as one of the most highly praised (both for its content and quality) versions of the sic-fi classic to date.

During a recent press junket for the Blu-ray release of the “Little Shop” director’s cut, IFC spoke with Galvao and director Frank Oz about the painstaking process of giving the world the ending the film should’ve had from the start.

“The most important thing was not to draw people away from the story because of the new ending,” Galvao told IFC. “Going into this, I knew it had to have the same amount of grain and the same warmth, color-wise. And I wanted to make sure, sound-wise, that it sounded the same [as the rest of the movie] and just… flowed. To achieve that, first we had to find the parts of each of the original pieces.”

And this was no small task, according to Galvao, whose team found themselves digging through piles of reels in Los Angeles, London, and Kansas in order to locate the missing film. With much of the film initially shot in London, the masters stored in L.A., and a massive vault of reels archived in Kansas (in order to protect the material from earthquakes), pulling everything together quickly became a globe-hopping endeavor.

Finally, on top of any logistical concerns, the rushed re-shoot of the film’s ending more than two decades ago left elements like the music, sound, and portions of the footage that would’ve been tweaked before release painfully incomplete.

“I started searching at Warner Bros., obviously, and from there to the deep mines of Kansas where there were some films, and followed the paperwork trail to London,” laughed Galvao.

“It was difficult finding all the pieces,” he said. “They weren’t where the boxes said they were, but we went through every piece, and I had guys on boxes for weeks looking at every frame. It took about a year and a half to pull it all together. And then on the sound side, we had to locate the original track of singing, get the original tracks in there, and find the dialogue tracks from the dailies. Some of them had damage, so we had to filter out the damage in some cases.”

Along with filtering out some of the negative effects of time, Galvao and his team were also called upon to add upon the existing material — a task that was actually made easier by the 26 years that had elapsed since the film’s premiere.

“We’re lucky to be in a digital world where we can scan the original negatives and have that as our base, then find all of the other elements of the other parts and recreate what they were originally trying to finish,” explained Galvao. “That included a lot of the optical effects, but back then the visual effects were all optically based. They didn’t have digital effects. So what I tried to do with our team was to stick with using all those frames of optical effects at whatever extent they were finished at, and then finish them digitally. But we always had to keep that look from the optical effects. We didn’t want it to be squeaky clean, so we actually had to add some grain here and there.”

Restoring the ending for “Little Shop Of Horrors” also gave Galvao and Oz the opportunity to see some of their favorite elements from the original finale returned to their proper place in the film. Oz told IFC he was particularly happy to give model designer Richard Conway a call to let him know that the massive amount of miniatures he had created — and subsequently destroyed — for the final montage of plants conquering the world would finally get its time in the spotlight.

For Galvao, one of the highlights of the restoration process was putting actor Paul Dooley back into the film. In the original ending for “Little Shop,” Dooley appears as a businessman who tells Seymour (Rick Moranis) that, thanks to some cuttings he took from the plant, his company has plans to mass-market “Audrey II” seedlings and make it the next big thing to fly off the shelves. This is followed by scenes of shoppers buying up the plants all around the country, which then leads into the destruction they cause around the world.

When the call came down for re-shoots, Dooley wasn’t available to film new scenes, and James Belushi was swapped in for Dooley’s role. Dooley was later given a “Special Thanks” in the credits, but never appeared in the theatrical version of the film.

“One thing that was really, really great was finding the piece with Paul Dooley and putting it back in there,” said Galvao.

For Galvao, when it comes to these restoration projects, the task of piecing everything back together is more than just a job — it’s personal.

“It becomes my baby, too,” he laughed. “I know Frank is the genius and the one who created it, but when I take one of these on, it’s my child. It’s a labor of love doing one of these, just like it is originally creating it. I just can’t stand seeings something that was slapped together put out there, so I like getting it down to the exact way it was meant to be and then making it as pretty as possible.”

“Little Shop Of Horrors: The Director’s Cut” is available now on Blu-ray. Make sure to checkout our extended interview with director Frank Oz and star Ellen Greene here on IFC.com.

Danzig-Portlandia-604-web

Face Melting Cameos

The 10 Most Metal Pop Culture Cameos

Glenn Danzig drops by Portlandia tonight at 10P on IFC.

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Glenn Danzig rocks harder than granite. In his 60 years, he’s mastered punk with The Misfits, slayed metal with the eponymous Danzig, and generally melted faces with the force of his voice. And thanks to Fred and Carrie, he’s now stopping by tonight’s brand new Portlandia so we can finally get to see what “Evil Elvis” is like when he hits the beach. To celebrate his appearance, we put together our favorite metal moments from pop culture, from the sublime to the absurd.

10. Cannibal Corpse meets Ace Ventura

Back in the ’90s,  Cannibal Corpse was just a small time band from Upstate New York, plying their death metal wares wherever they could find a crowd, when a call from Jim Carry transformed their lives. Turns out the actor was a fan, and wanted them for a cameo in his new movie, Ace Ventura: Pet Detective. The band had a European tour coming up, and were wary of being made fun of, so they turned it down. Thankfully, the rubber-faced In Living Color vet wouldn’t take no for an answer, proving that you don’t need to have a lot of fans, just the right ones.


9. AC/DC in Private Parts

Howard Stern’s autobiographical film, based on his book of the same name, followed his rise in the world of radio and pop culture. For a man surrounded by naked ladies and adoring fans, it’s hard to track the exact moment he made it. But rocking out with AC/DC in the middle of Central Park, as throngs of fans clamor to get a piece of you, seems like it comes pretty close. You can actually see Stern go from hit host to radio god in this clip, as “You Shook Me All Night Long” blasts in the background.


8. Judas Priest meets The Simpsons

When you want to blast a bunch of peace-loving hippies out on their asses, you’re going to need some death metal. At least, that’s what the folks at The Simpsons thought when they set up this cameo from the metal gods. Unfortunately, thanks to a hearty online backlash, the writers of the classic series were soon informed that Judas Priest, while many things, are not in fact “death metal.” This led to the most Simpson-esque apology ever. Rock on, Bartman. Rock on.


7. Anthrax on Married…With Children

What do you get when Married…with Children spoofs My Dinner With Andre, substituting the erudite playwrights for a band so metal they piss rust? Well, for starters, a lot of headbanging, property destruction and blown eardrums. And much like everything else in life, Al seems to have missed the fun.


6. Motorhead rocks out on The Young Ones

The Young Ones didn’t just premiere on BBC2 in 1982 — it kicked the doors down to a new way of doing comedy. A full-on assault on the staid state of sitcoms, the show brought a punk rock vibe to the tired format, and in the process helped jumpstart a comedy revolution. For instance, where an old sitcom would just cut from one scene to the next, The Young Ones choose to have Lemmy and his crew deliver a raw version of “Ace of Spades.” The general attitude seemed to be, you don’t like this? Well, then F— you!


5. Red and Kitty Meet Kiss on That ’70s Show

Carsey-Werner Productions

Carsey-Werner Productions

Long before they were banished to playing arena football games, Kiss was the hottest ticket in rock. The gang from That ’70s Show got to live out every ’70s teen’s dream when they were set loose backstage at a Kiss concert, taking full advantage of groupies, ganja and hard rock.


4. Ronnie James Dio in Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny (NSFW, people!)

What does a young boy do when he was born to rock, and the world won’t let him? What tight compadre does he pray to for guidance and some sweet licks? If you’re a young Jables, half of “the world’s most awesome band,” you bow your head to Ronnie James Dio, aka the guy who freaking taught the world how to do the “Metal Horns.” Never before has a rock god been so literal than in this clip that turns it up to eleven.


3. Ozzy Osbourne in Trick or Treat

It’s hard to tell if Ozzy was trying his hardest here, or just didn’t give a flying f–k. What is clear is that, either way, it doesn’t really matter. Ozzy’s approach to acting seems to lean more heavily on Jack Daniels than sense memory, and yet seeing the slurry English rocker play a sex-obsessed televangelist is so ridiculous, he gets a free pass. Taking part in the cult horror Trick or Treat, Ozzy proves that he makes things better just by showing up. Because that’s exactly what he did here. Showed up. And it rocks.


2. Glenn Danzig on Portlandia

Danzig seems to be coming out of a self imposed exile these days. He just signed with a record company, and his appearance on Portlandia is reminding everyone how kick ass he truly is. Who else but “The Other Man in Black” could help Portland’s resident goths figure out what to wear to the beach? Carrie Brownstein called Danzig “amazing,” and he called Fred “a genius,” so this was a rare love fest for the progenitor of horror punk.


1. Alice Cooper in Wayne’s World

It’s surprising, sure, but for a scene that contains no music whatsoever, it’s probably the most famous metal moment in the history of film. When Alice Cooper informed Wayne and Garth that Milwaukee is actually pronounced “Milly-way-kay” back in 1992, he created one of the most famous scenes in comedy history. What’s more metal than that? Much like Wayne and Garth, we truly are not worthy.

Frank Oz and Ellen Greene discuss feeding the need for “Little Shop of Horrors: The Director’s Cut”

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It’s hard to believe it’s been over 25 years since director Frank Oz brought the quirky brilliance of an off-Broadway musical about a killer plant to the big screen. Still, a quarter-century later the award-winning “Little Shop of Horrors” is back on shelves with a new “Director’s Cut” featuring the original, darker ending of the film that Oz and screenwriter Howard Ashman intended for the film.

While sketchy black-and-white prints of the original ending — which featured an army of massive, man-eating alien plants destroying the world — have been circulating online for years, the Blu-ray features a fully remastered, colored, and otherwise restored version of the ending (and the rest of the film, of course).

Meticulously restored by Warner Bros. Pictures Vice President of Assets & Technology/Post Production Kurt Galvao, the “Director’s Cut” of the film offers a cornucopia of features that go a long way toward making the “Little Shop of Horrors” experience just as memorable now as it was back in 1986.

IFC had the chance to sit down with Oz and actress Ellen Greene, who played Audrey in both the original stage production and the movie with Rick Moranis, to reflect on the “Little Shop of Horrors” legacy and their wildly imaginative film’s return to the spotlight. Oh, and we couldn’t help asking Oz about another green-skinned character he’s often associated with, too.

IFC: When you come back to a movie after so many years like this, what’s going through your head?

FRANK OZ: I look back on my work and I think, “Oh, why didn’t I do that differently?” [Laughs] But mainly I look back and every shot is a memory for me. You guys see what’s on the screen, but I see what led to it and I see what happened on the set and all that stuff. But I’m proud of the work. I’m very proud of it.

ELLEN GREENE: I’m just so proud that they did this. To be here and share in the excitement of it all, I’m so proud.

IFC: This version of the film is called “The Director’s Cut,” so is it safe to assume that this is your preferred version of the film, Frank?

OZ: Yes, it is. Oddly enough, though, I have not been a party to putting it together. Kurt called me about a year ago saying that he’d done this. So I was in L.A. and I went to a screening of it and I thought it was great. They were very true to my notes. They had a black-and-white dupe from years past, which was the template. If I had to do it over again, I would change my notes, not their work. [Laughs] But I would shorten it. They stayed true to it, though. I’m really thrilled because Richard Conway, who spent almost a year of his life on the miniatures at the end of the film only to have me call him 26 years ago and say we wouldn’t use them, now I got to call him six months ago and say, “You’re going to see them!” That was the thrilling part for me: that people could see his work.

IFC: What about you, Ellen? Is this your preferred ending? As someone who played Audrey for years on the stage with the same ending, it must have seemed a little weird to change that ending for the movie…

GREENE: Well, they said that when they tested it, the audience didn’t want Audrey and Seymour to die. And if you notice, the film is a little darker than the stage production. The stage production is a little sillier, with more… Audreyisms, I guess. The death scene in the stage production is funny as well as being sad, but the death scene in the movie as I recall it is not funny. Frank made me more of a heroine. But you know what? I love them all like different children, but if Frank says this is the best version, I believe Frank. And hey, it will be [the best version], because how can you top the destruction of the world as an ending?

IFC: Can you take us back to the moment you realized that you were going to have to change the ending of the story? This had to have been a tough decision…

OZ: Well, both the screenings in San Jose and Los Angeles were fantastic, with the audience applauding after every single number. It was just great until we had the plant eat Rick [Moranis] and Ellen. That was exactly what Howard [Ashman] and I wanted to do to stay true to the stage show. David Geffen said at the beginning that you can’t do that, but we asked him to do it and he said, “Fine.” He respected us and honored our desire. But he was right, we couldn’t do it. And once we knew the audience was angry at us for doing that, we knew what we had to do and how the ending would work. We knew it would grow out of the theme “Somewhere That’s Green.” We knew that the wish of being somewhere that’s green would be resolved at the end of the movie. Howard wrote it and I knew it. We just had to go back and re-shoot it for several weeks. What we actually had to do was not as difficult as the fact that we had to do it.

IFC: Looking back on it, “Little Shop” is such a unique project. Do you think anyone could ever make a movie like it today?

OZ: No. You couldn’t make this movie today. First of all, even at that time Warners had a hard time marketing it. It’s 14 songs with a plant that talks and people being killed and cut up. How do you sell something like that? No one would take a chance on that now.

GREENE: It’s all an act of love, too. What’s interesting is that when the stage production began, we were just a bunch of amazing kids creating something for $50 week that was so brilliant. And then Frank came along and equaled or maybe even topped it. Not many people can do musicals, and not only is it exciting and funny and visually amazing, but the casting brilliant and the direction is outstanding, and it’s only becoming more and more famous through the years. Both were acts of love, and successful acts of love that stand the test of time. How often does that happen?

The X-Files

The Truth is Scary

The 12 Scariest Episodes of The X-Files

Catch the X-Files movies Saturday, January 23rd starting at 12:15P ET/11:15 PT on IFC.

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In the early ’90s, The X-Files was a cultural happening, right up there with Pogs and the Bartman. It hit at a perfect moment, spawning catchphrases and racy fan fiction that helped shape the early days of the Internet. With The X-Files: Fight the Future and The X-Files: I Want to Believe airing this month on IFC, we thought we’d revisit some of the scariest episodes the show ever produced. Wake up your inner ’90s child, and let them know they won’t being going to sleep tonight, because the truth is out there, and it is freaking terrifying.


12. “Our Town,” Season Two

We all know small towns have something to hide, at least on The X-Files. That certainly proved true in this second season episode that made us rethink our eating habits. When The X-Files did horror, the writers always strived to find a new slant on an old genre. Here, that meant taking the iconography of cannibals, masked murderers and factory farming, and whipping them together into a uniquely scary stew. “Our Town” isn’t a perfect episode, falling into cliché at times (Scully pulls the damsel in distress routine for the umpteeth time), but it more than makes up for its faults with some genuine scares.


11. “Chinga,” Season Five

What do you get when you combine the greatest horror show of its time with the greatest horror author of the century? The answer is this fifth season episode, penned by Stephen King himself, about a mind controlling killer doll come to life. Whether it’s clawing out your own eyes, or stabbing yourself with a hammer, this stuffed little lady is impossible to say no to. While the episode received mixed reviews, for any fan of King, it’s a must watch. If nothing else, the surprise the network got when they learned that “Chinga” is actually a curse word in Spanish must’ve been pretty terrifying.


10. “Eve,” Season One

Nothing is scarier than twins. That’s just a fact. But what if those creepy twins were just the tip of the iceberg? What if countless clones were made in some secret government lab, all with one purpose… Murder! That’s the idea here, as Mulder and Scully face off against a ragtag band of grimy killer clones, who will just as soon bite your head off as look at you. “Eve” was a creepy first season episode that demonstrated what a mastery of genre the show would have moving forward.


9. “The Host,” Season Two

For any of us that have worried about what monsters may be lurking in the toilet, this episode confirmed our very worst fears. An early effort at the “Monster-of-the-Week” format that would come to define the show, it’s far from a perfect episode. But what it does do effectively is create a creepy monster with a freakish sucker face that plays on our unspoken fears of the unknown. An early indicator of what this show was capable of, “The Host” (and Flukeman) still freaks us out enough to make the list.


8. “Folie à Deux,” Season Five

There’s nothing scarier than losing your mind. That’s what this season five episode explored, when Mulder found himself seeing monsters no one else could. Was he cracking up? Or were they real (and unstoppable) because no one would believe him? Which is really more terrifying? A spooky outing full of fun ideas and creepy visuals, this was one of the few episodes that made you wonder if Mulder was going to find a way out of it in one piece.


7. “Irresistible,” Season Two

The X-Files would do anything for a scare, even if it meant dropping the supernatural for an episode and showing us how terrifying man can be without all the aliens and ghosts to get in the way. “Irresistible” focused on a Scully-obsessed serial killer who takes misogyny to the next level, killing women and keeping their hair and fingers as trophies. The episode stands out thanks to a furiously creepy performance from Nick Chinlund, who imbues his killer with an oily smugness. Featuring one of the show’s all-time best guest spots, this episode really showed why you should trust no one.


6. “Die Hand Die Verletzt,” Season Two

Everyone knows that substitute teachers are a bunch of pushovers. Well, that doesn’t seem to be the case in Milford Haven, New Hampshire, where desks are filled with student’s eyes and hearts, instead of homework. This season two episode explored what happens when those we trust with our kids prey upon them. While the story was fairly conventional, the scares were intense, playing out ritual sacrifice and supernatural suicide against a backdrop of typical high school drama.


5. “Patient X,” Season Five

Most of the truly scary, full-blown horror episodes of The X-Files were stand alone, and separate from the show’s larger mythology. This episode is different. Diving head first into the show’s labyrinthine plot about alien invasion, “Patient X” showed how terrifying visitors from outer space could be. There’s lots of dark moments here. Bodies burned alive. Alien infections. But none compare to the visual of the infected, their bloody eyes and mouths sewn shut, coming for us all. One of the most striking visuals the show ever came up with, it was a moment that turned an episode that was for true blue fans into something that could freak out just about anybody.


4. “Sanguinarium,” Season Four

Talk about medical malpractice. This fourth season episode explored the trust we place in our doctors to not go batty and start ritually sacrificing us while they’re all up in our guts. Plastic surgery was just becoming a way of life in the ’90s, which meant it was a fertile subject for satire. And what is horror but satire with blood? X-Files creator Chris Carter saw the potential in exploring the glamorous industry’s dark underbelly of vanity and pride. It’s not much of a leap from paying a doctor thousands of dollars for the perfect body to selling your soul for one. And, of course, there’s plenty of blood to boot.


3. “Field Trip,” Season Six

This sixth season episode was a head-trip, for both the characters and the audience. What’s real and what’s a hallucination? In the episode, Mulder and Scully both find themselves under the effects of a potent, psychotropic spore that causes them to vividly hallucinate. We see them kidnap aliens and die horrible deaths, all while still trapped inside their own minds. Each time we think they’ve made it free, we realize this is just another layer of fantasy. A mind-tripping horror show that leave us on the edge of our seats, “Field Trip” was one of the most innovative and freaky episodes in the show’s run.


2. “Detour,” Season Five

You’re lost in the woods, being hunted by a monster you can’t see. AND you have to deal with some serious sexual tension with your work wife to boot. That’s the premise of this classic episode from the show’s fifth season which pits Mulder and Scully against nature itself, by way of a chameleon-like “Monster-of-the-Week.” The monster in this episode was one of the show’s best, blending into its surrounding just enough to be anywhere, while always tipping us off with its disturbing, glowing eyes. If we can all agree to ignore its similarities to Predator, this is one of the show’s very best episodes.


1. “Home,” Season Four

One of the most controversial outings in the show’s history, this season four episode was so brutal, so graphic, and so disturbing that some fans felt like they’d been betrayed. In a sense, this episode posits what would happen if Mulder and Scully wandered into The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, but with a bit less chainsaw, and bit more inbred freaks. The show would never again create freaks as disturbing as The Peacocks, who were almost scarier for their way of life than their brutal murders.

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