DID YOU READ

The Coen Brothers’ movies in order

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Let’s be honest: when it comes to movies by Joel and Ethan Coens, there are no losers. Over the last (almost) three decades, the dynamic duo known as the Coen Brothers have crafted some of the most memorable, most quotable, funniest, strangest, darkest, and generally greatest movies. Their films are typically evocative of simpler times while creating complex stories filled with indelible characters range from the sublime “The Dude” to the creepy motorcycle riding maniacal momma’s boy in “Raising Arizona.” These remarkable characters are cast from a steady stable of venerable actors like George Clooney, John Turturro, Francis McDormand, John Goodman, Jeff Bridges, Steve Buscemi, and many more willing to put on a fake mustache, prosthetic limb, unnecessary eye patch, or incredibly bad haircut (Javier Bardem has never looked worse than in “No Country For Old Men”) in order to enter the weird and wonderful of the Coen Brothers. And who wouldn’t jump at a chance to star in one of their viciously funny, hilariously blood-soaked, funny, witty, and clever films? The Coen Brothers make amazing movies, bar none.

In honor of “Miller’s Crossing” airing today at 3:30 p.m. ET, we’re attempting the impossible and we’re going to rank the Coen Brothers. God help us.

Here are the Coen Brothers’ movies, in order. Feel free to argue:

“The Ladykillers” (2004)

“Intolerable Cruelty” (2003)

“The Man Who Wasn’t There” (2001)

“A Serious Man” (2009)

“Burn After Reading” (2008)

“Blood Simple” (1984)

“Barton Fink” (1991)

“The Hudsucker Proxy” (1994)

“O Brother, Where Art Thou?” (2000)

“True Grit” (2010)

“Miller’s Crossing” (1990)

“The Big Lebowski” (1998)

“No Country for Old Men” (2007)

“Fargo” (1996)

“Raising Arizona” (1987)

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“Miller’s Crossing” airs today at 3:30 PM ET

Carol Cate Blanchett

Spirit Guide

Check Out the Spirit Awards Nominees for Best Male and Female Leads

Catch the 2016 Spirit Awards live Feb. 27th at 5P ET/2P PT on IFC.

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Photo Credit: Wilson Webb/©Weinstein Company/Courtesy Everett Collection

From Jason Segel’s somber character study of author David Foster Wallace, to Brie Larson’s devastating portrayal of a mother in captivity, the 2016 Spirit Awards nominees for Best Male and Female Leads represent the finest in the year of film acting. Take a look at the Best Male and Female Leads in action, presented by Jaguar.

Best Male Lead 

Christopher Abbott, James White
Abraham Attah, Beasts of No Nation
Ben Mendelsohn, Mississippi Grind
Jason Segel, The End of the Tour
Koudous Seihon, Mediterranea

Watch more Male Lead nominee videos here.

Best Female Lead 

Cate Blanchett, Carol
Brie Larson, Room
Rooney Mara, Carol
Bel Powley, The Diary of A Teenage Girl
Kitana Kiki Rodriguez, Tangerine

Watch more Female Lead nominee videos here.

Five favorite Billy Bob Thornton roles

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We’re showing “Monster’s Ball” tonight at 8/7c. It’s a blistering Southern gothic melodrama from director Marc Forster that is sure to get your stomach in a knot and your tear ducts flowing, so be sure to serve nachos because nachos solve everything, which is why they serve them at Camp David. (<---FACT*) The film stars Billy Bob Thornton as Hank Grotowski, a vehement racist whose wife committed suicide some years ago. He works as a corrections officer at a Louisiana prison. No one feels the sting of Hank’s seething bitterness more than his own son (Heath Ledger), whose own self-loathing reaches the point of no return when he follows in his mother’s footsteps after his father admits his lifelong hatred for him. This sudden tragedy prompts a turning point in Hank’s life as he strikes up a completely unexpected romance with the struggling widow (Berry) of the last prisoner he executed (Sean Combs), much to the chagrin of his ailing yet even more despicable father (Peter Boyle). Milo Addica and Will Rokos received an Oscar nomination for their original screenplay.

While Halle Berry got a well-deserved Oscar for her portrayal of a grief-stricken widow, Thornton does an incredible job making racist corrections officer Grotowski into a sympathetic character. But that's what audiences have come to expect from Thornton, whether he's portraying a drunken seasonal employee or voicing a character in "Princess Mononoke," Thornton always delivers. Here's our list of five of our favorite Billy Bob Thornton roles:

1. Ed Crane in “The Man Who Wasn’t There”

2. Coach Gary Gaines in “Friday Night Lights”

3. Jacob in “A Simple Plan”

4. Willie in “Bad Santa”

5. Karl Childers in “Slingblade”

* Not a fact

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“Monster’s Ball” airs tonight at 8/7c; Thursday, Sep. 6 at 12:45 AM ET; Tuesday, Sep. 18 at 11:00 PM ET; and Wednesday, Sep. 19 at 1:30 AM ET

Top 10 bullet scenes in movies

Keanu Reeves in The Matrix

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With this week’s premiere of IFC’s crime-ridden, ultra-violent two-night event “Bullet in the Face” (kicking off Thursday 10/9c), let’s lock, load and take aim at some of the most memorable bullet scenes in cinema.


“The Matrix” (1999) – “Bullet time”

One simply cannot even fathom doing a bullet-themed feature without including the film that introduced the term “bullet-time” into the pop culture consciousness. While some of the visual effects in the Wachowskis’ game-changing science-fiction thriller may now look a little dated (hey, it’s been over 13 years, after all), the maestro flourish featuring Neo (Keanu Reeves) dodging the tiny particles being fired at him by the Agents (mostly by really, really leaning back) remains an exhilarating sight. What a great hero moment – and a great bullet moment, at that.


“Superman Returns” (2006) – “Bullet vs. Superman’s Eye”

And who do you think wins? Special effects technology has leaped tall buildings in a single bound since the time of the 1978 “Superman,” which means that by 2006 director Bryan Singer could really get big (or, in this case, small) in showing off the many powers of the Man of Steel. We love this scene mostly because this idiot truly seems to think that a silly machine gun is going to stop the guy in the red cape whom everyone knows can’t be hurt by bullets, even when there’s a lot of them all at once. That single bullet being crushed by coming into contact with one of Superman’s baby blues is one of the film’s most audience-pleasing moments.


“Fight Club” (1999) – “Exorcising Tyler Durden”

Sure, the Narrator’s (Edward Norton) last resort in ridding himself of his id-driven terrorist alter-ego (Brad Pitt) might not make much sense (we guess a bullet in the cheek is a quick cure for psychosis?), but it sure is viscerally satisfying … especially when Tyler himself gets one more quip in (“What’s that smell?”) before hitting the floor and floating back into the subconsious. One has to wonder if screenwriter Jim Uhls didn’t quite know how to wrap up the central conflict in “Fight Club” after considerably changing the ending of Chuck Palahniuk’s novel already, but hey, there’s something about it that works just fine. Unfortunately we don’t have the clip itself, but why not go behind-the-scenes of the movie magic that brought this slo-mo ker-blam to life?


“Pulp Fiction” (1994) – “Marvin Should’ve Had an Opinion”

“Oh man, I shot Marvin in the face…” John Travolta’s blithe line reading of hapless hitman Vincent Vega’s reaction to his unfortunate “accident” in Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction” turns a shockingly violent set piece into one of the film’s funniest moments (Jules’ profane-ridden outrage at the sudden situation helps, too). We’ll never quite know how Vincent managed to squeeze on the trigger whilst insisting that his associate, Marvin, has to have an opinion on whether or not the fact that he and Jules (Samuel L. Jackson) survived a recent ambush was an “act of God” or not, but it’s probably most definitely not because driver Jules “hit a bump or something.” Anyway, time to get to Jimmy’s at Toluca Lake and call the Wolf to clean up the mess!


“Fargo” (1996) – “Ohhhhh geez…”

“I gave simple fu**ing instructions!” Oh, Carl, don’t you know this caper was doomed from the start when it couldn’t be agreed whether Shep said the meeting was 7:30 or 8:30? Things go from bad to almost supernaturally worse in “Fargo,” and Wade’s (Harve Presnell) alpha-male ego doesn’t help matters when he thinks he can strong-arm the men who kidnapped his daughter. “No Jean, no money!” gets Wade shot through his parka (we love that poof of cotton – oh, Coen Brothers!), though he manages to avenge himself somewhat by shooting Carl in the face (Steve Buscemi). “You should see the other guy,” Carl will later joke to his partner, Gaer Grimsrud (Peter Stormare), who will later top it all by showing you don’t need a gun when an axe and wood chipper will do just fine.

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