DID YOU READ

“The Master” debuts its final trailer

072712-the-master

Posted by on

If it were possible to win an Academy Award for the best trailer of the year, we think the final teaser for Paul Thomas Anderson’s “The Master” would take the Oscar gold home.

Never have we seen a minute-long trailer used so effectively. There is some new footage here, but the impact of the teaser is the same as its predecessors. Anderson has proved that he is The Master at his craft with just the snippets of scenes presented here. Hopefully the final product can hold up to the high expectations “The Master” has made for itself.

Early reviews to “The Master” have been glowing, despite some complaints about the film’s third act. As is evident in this trailer, the acting, cinematography and score are supposed to be three of the most impressive parts of Anderson’s latest feature film. “The Master” will make its premiere at the Venice Film Festival soon, and will be followed by a limited theatrical release on September 14 followed by a nationwide run on September 21.

“The Master” tells the story of a man known as “the Master” (Philip Seymour Hoffman) who creates a set of religious beliefs along the lines of Scientology or Mormonism and watches as it catches on in America. Joaquin Phoenix plays a soldier who has trouble settling into his life until he meets the Master, and then finds his sense of purpose and becomes his right-hand man. All is well until he begins questioning his decision to do so. It’s believed that “The Master” tells a fictionalized version of the creation of Scientology. It also stars Amy Adams, Laura Dern, Jesse Plemons and Rami Malek.

Are you as impressed with this teaser as we are? Tell us in the comments section below or on Facebook and Twitter.

Danzig-Portlandia-604-web

Face Melting Cameos

The 10 Most Metal Pop Culture Cameos

Glenn Danzig drops by Portlandia tonight at 10P on IFC.

Posted by on

Glenn Danzig rocks harder than granite. In his 60 years, he’s mastered punk with The Misfits, slayed metal with the eponymous Danzig, and generally melted faces with the force of his voice. And thanks to Fred and Carrie, he’s now stopping by tonight’s brand new Portlandia so we can finally get to see what “Evil Elvis” is like when he hits the beach. To celebrate his appearance, we put together our favorite metal moments from pop culture, from the sublime to the absurd.

10. Cannibal Corpse meets Ace Ventura

Back in the ’90s,  Cannibal Corpse was just a small time band from Upstate New York, plying their death metal wares wherever they could find a crowd, when a call from Jim Carry transformed their lives. Turns out the actor was a fan, and wanted them for a cameo in his new movie, Ace Ventura: Pet Detective. The band had a European tour coming up, and were wary of being made fun of, so they turned it down. Thankfully, the rubber-faced In Living Color vet wouldn’t take no for an answer, proving that you don’t need to have a lot of fans, just the right ones.


9. AC/DC in Private Parts

Howard Stern’s autobiographical film, based on his book of the same name, followed his rise in the world of radio and pop culture. For a man surrounded by naked ladies and adoring fans, it’s hard to track the exact moment he made it. But rocking out with AC/DC in the middle of Central Park, as throngs of fans clamor to get a piece of you, seems like it comes pretty close. You can actually see Stern go from hit host to radio god in this clip, as “You Shook Me All Night Long” blasts in the background.


8. Judas Priest meets The Simpsons

When you want to blast a bunch of peace-loving hippies out on their asses, you’re going to need some death metal. At least, that’s what the folks at The Simpsons thought when they set up this cameo from the metal gods. Unfortunately, thanks to a hearty online backlash, the writers of the classic series were soon informed that Judas Priest, while many things, are not in fact “death metal.” This led to the most Simpson-esque apology ever. Rock on, Bartman. Rock on.


7. Anthrax on Married…With Children

What do you get when Married…with Children spoofs My Dinner With Andre, substituting the erudite playwrights for a band so metal they piss rust? Well, for starters, a lot of headbanging, property destruction and blown eardrums. And much like everything else in life, Al seems to have missed the fun.


6. Motorhead rocks out on The Young Ones

The Young Ones didn’t just premiere on BBC2 in 1982 — it kicked the doors down to a new way of doing comedy. A full-on assault on the staid state of sitcoms, the show brought a punk rock vibe to the tired format, and in the process helped jumpstart a comedy revolution. For instance, where an old sitcom would just cut from one scene to the next, The Young Ones choose to have Lemmy and his crew deliver a raw version of “Ace of Spades.” The general attitude seemed to be, you don’t like this? Well, then F— you!


5. Red and Kitty Meet Kiss on That ’70s Show

Carsey-Werner Productions

Carsey-Werner Productions

Long before they were banished to playing arena football games, Kiss was the hottest ticket in rock. The gang from That ’70s Show got to live out every ’70s teen’s dream when they were set loose backstage at a Kiss concert, taking full advantage of groupies, ganja and hard rock.


4. Ronnie James Dio in Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny (NSFW, people!)

What does a young boy do when he was born to rock, and the world won’t let him? What tight compadre does he pray to for guidance and some sweet licks? If you’re a young Jables, half of “the world’s most awesome band,” you bow your head to Ronnie James Dio, aka the guy who freaking taught the world how to do the “Metal Horns.” Never before has a rock god been so literal than in this clip that turns it up to eleven.


3. Ozzy Osbourne in Trick or Treat

It’s hard to tell if Ozzy was trying his hardest here, or just didn’t give a flying f–k. What is clear is that, either way, it doesn’t really matter. Ozzy’s approach to acting seems to lean more heavily on Jack Daniels than sense memory, and yet seeing the slurry English rocker play a sex-obsessed televangelist is so ridiculous, he gets a free pass. Taking part in the cult horror Trick or Treat, Ozzy proves that he makes things better just by showing up. Because that’s exactly what he did here. Showed up. And it rocks.


2. Glenn Danzig on Portlandia

Danzig seems to be coming out of a self imposed exile these days. He just signed with a record company, and his appearance on Portlandia is reminding everyone how kick ass he truly is. Who else but “The Other Man in Black” could help Portland’s resident goths figure out what to wear to the beach? Carrie Brownstein called Danzig “amazing,” and he called Fred “a genius,” so this was a rare love fest for the progenitor of horror punk.


1. Alice Cooper in Wayne’s World

It’s surprising, sure, but for a scene that contains no music whatsoever, it’s probably the most famous metal moment in the history of film. When Alice Cooper informed Wayne and Garth that Milwaukee is actually pronounced “Milly-way-kay” back in 1992, he created one of the most famous scenes in comedy history. What’s more metal than that? Much like Wayne and Garth, we truly are not worthy.

Critics praise “The Master” after early screening

072012-the-master

Posted by on

“The Master” screened at Chicago’s Music Box Theater last night in 70mm, the format that director Paul Thomas Anderson intended it to be seen in, and those lucky enough to snag a ticket to the second public screening of the movie were duly impressed. We’ve pulled together a handful of reviews that were published following the screening, and the general responses praised Anderson’s direction as well as the performances given by stars Joaquin Phoenix and Philip Seymour Hoffman. Still, there were some complaints with the run time and the ending, and even “The Master’s” biggest fans said the film had its faults.

But the real star of last night’s screening was the 70mm format. Every technical element of the movie — from its gorgeous cinematography to Johnny Greenwood’s fantastic score — were reportedly enhanced by the viewing experience, meaning that cinephiles should deem it necessary to see “The Master” in that format.

The Playlist writer Charlie Schmidlin was present at the screening and wrote in his review that every element of the movie, from the acting to the period setting to the score, was a “success” for Anderson. But above that, he said the 70mm was what brought the film up to a whole new level.

“If there was any doubt Anderson had about shooting in 70mm, the opening shot of crystal-clear, vibrant blue sea should dismiss those thoughts entirely,” Schmidlin writes. “There is an immediate and immersive quality to the image here, and combined with the film’s sustained atmosphere of dread, it is altogether an experience at which to marvel.”

Patrick McGavin at Movieline found “The Master’s” strength to be in its visuals, much like Anderson’s previous movie, “There Will Be Blood.”

“Visually, the movie is a marvel of precise and lyrical imagery. One sustained single-take tracking shot follows a young woman as she models a fur jacket. In another vivid, sexually hallucinatory moment, Freddie imagines all the women surrounding Lancaster during a musical number naked,” he writes. “In the first of several tense encounters between the two men that functions as Lancaster’s inquisition of the tremulous Freddie, Anderson unflinchingly keeps the camera tight on their faces. The scene plays out in one long, unbroken take, and the effect is hypnotic.”

However, he then writes that “the second half [of the film] is less audacious and more problematic.”

After a screening in Los Angeles earlier in the month, Thompson on Hollywood writer Beth Hanna praised Hoffman’s performance as being the standout in the movie.

“Hoffman goes big with this role. His Master is intensely focused, almost cartoonishly charismatic and seductive. But as he brings Freddie into the fold of his teachings, which include pre-birth recordings, past lives and strict emotional self-control, Master proves to be a simmering powder-keg,” she writes. “When he snaps, it jolts you out of your seat. (This nicely matches Johnny Greenwood’s percussive, anxiety-inducing score.) Freddie and Master have a symbiotic relationship, where Freddie can feel anchored by Master’s stranglehold, and Master can ward off his paranoia (outside groups are increasingly criticizing his methods) by focusing his efforts on such an inscrutable weakling.”

Both /Film and CriticWire have great recaps of Twitter responses to the screening in Chicago.

“The Master” hits theaters in limited release on September 14.

Do you plan to see “The Master” when it is released? Will you see it in 70mm? Tell us in the comments section below or on Facebook and Twitter.

“The Master” moves up release date to September 14

072712-the-master

Posted by on

We won’t have to wait much longer to meet “The Master.”

Though the Philip Seymour Hoffman-starring film was due to be released in October, the Weinstein company has announced through Variety that “The Master” will open in limited release on September 14 before expanding to a full release the following week. That’s great news to everyone everywhere, because the Paul Thomas Anderson film looks to be one of the best movies of the year.

As a result, Andrew Dominik’s “Killing Them Softly” has been bumped back to “The Master’s” vacated release date, October 19. Dominik’s follow-up to “The Assassination of Jesse James” premiered at Cannes to a positive response, and will likely have a solid run in the awards season as well. The critics circles responsible for those events seem to be having a love affair with Brad Pitt nowadays, and for good reason.

“The Master” tells the story of a man known as “the Master” (Philip Seymour Hoffman) who creates a set of religious beliefs along the lines of Scientology or Mormonism and watches as it catches on in America. Joaquin Phoenix plays a soldier who has trouble settling into his life until he meets the Master, and then finds his sense of purpose and becomes his right-hand man. All is well until he begins questioning his decision to do so. It’s believed that “The Master” tells a fictionalized version of the creation of Scientology. It also stars Joaquin Phoenix, Amy Adams, Laura Dern, Jesse Plemons and Rami Malek.

Are you excited that “The Master” has moved up a month? Tell us in the comments section below or on Facebook and Twitter.

Powered by ZergNet