DID YOU READ

Adapt This: “Killer Of Demons” by Christopher Yost and Scott Wegener

killer of demons

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With Hollywood turning more of its attention to the world of graphic novels for inspiration, I’ll cast the spotlight on a cool comic book each week that has the potential to pack a theater or keep you glued to your television screens. At the end of some “Adapt This” columns, you’ll also find thoughts from various comic creators and other industry experts about the books they’d like to see make the jump from page to screen.


This Week’s Book: Killer of Demons by Christopher Yost & Scott Wegener

The Premise: Dave Sloan is a junior account executive for an advertising firm that specializes in promoting products like cigarettes, junk food, and other products of questionable value to humanity. After he’s visited by an angel no one else can see, he learns that he’s been tasked with cleansing the world of demons — many of which happen to be masquerading as his least-favorite people. Uncertain if he’s actually on a god-given mission or simply going insane, Dave must decide whether to embrace his demon-killing destiny or submit himself for psychiatric evaluation. (You can probably guess which option he chooses.)

The Pitch: The story of a guy who sees secret monsters everywhere he looks has been done a number of times before (including a memorable X-Files” episode and the under-rated 2001 film “Frailty”), but Yost manages to make the concept feel fresh and original in Killer of Demons by adding a healthy dose of comedy and some great supporting characters. From the bawdy angel Uriel who serves as Dave’s sidekick, guide, and possible sign of his mental collapse, to the long list of demons that had, until recently, been his coworkers, the world Yost and Wegener have created around their main character is filled with colorful elements with lots of on-screen potential.

Think “Office Space” crossed with “The Evil Dead” and you’re on the right track with Yost’s blend of gory horror, over-the-top action, and raunchy humor that mines both supernatural lore and the less-distinct hell that comes with being a cog in the corporate machine.

While the book could certainly exist as a mature-audience television series — think of it like a bloodier, raunchier version of “Reaper” or possibly something akin to “Chuck” with a heavy dose of sex, violence, and monsters — a “Killer of Demons” feature film feels like the way to go, with an initial film that follows the first story arc of the series and the potential for sequels as Dave’s demon-slaying quest continues.

In order to get the most out of a “Killer of Demons” movie, the project needs a filmmaker who can find the right mix of humor and horror to keep the whole thing shy of becoming an outright comedy or moody, psychological scare-fest. Sam Raimi is an obvious choice, but directors like Eli Craig of “Tucker and Dale vs. Evil” or Joe Cornish from “Attack the Block” feel like logical choices, too. And with Yost’s work in the television realm, it’s worth it to give him a crack at the screenplay.

The Closing Argument: There’s a lot to like about the worlds Killer of Demons seems to have its feet in, and the aforementioned mash-up of “Office Space” and “The Evil Dead” still feels like the best comparison to make for a project like this. There’s something terrifying and funny about the corporate experience, and Killer of Demons makes a great argument that the same can be said of hunting monsters, too. Much like “Evil Dead” hero Ashley J. Williams, Dave Sloan is an everyman character that audiences can relate to, who becomes almost superhuman when he sets his mind to vanquishing the creatures tormenting him.

Given the right director and cast, it’s easy to envision Killer of Demons as source material for the next fan-favorite, big-screen adventure that keeps audiences alternating between laughs and screams, and makes a hero out of an unassuming desk jockey.


Would “Killer of Demons” make a good movie? Chime in below or on Facebook or Twitter.

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Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

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He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

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On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

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Draught Pick

Sam Adams “Keeps It Brockmire”

All New Brockmire airs Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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From baseball to beer, Jim Brockmire calls ’em like he sees ’em.

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It’s no wonder at all, then, that Sam Adams would reach out to Brockmire to be their shockingly-honest (and inevitably short-term) new spokesperson. Unscripted and unrestrained, he’ll talk straight about Sam—and we’ll take his word. Check out this new testimonial for proof:

See more Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC, presented by Samuel Adams. Good f***** beer.

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