This browser is supported only in Windows 10 and above.

DID YOU READ

Shelf Life: “Harold and Maude”

Harold and Maude

Posted by on

Moving backwards through cinema history isn’t just fun, but essential for a person to develop a deeper sense of the medium: no matter how well you know the latest sci-fi opus or drama, its structure in some way, shape or form was almost invariably preceded by a similar one. Conversely, there are some movies that you just freaking love so, so much, and are lucky to discover ones came before it that could give you that same feeling, that sense of enjoyment, or yeah, a deeper appreciation of the one that made you look at it in the first place.

All of which brings us to the less conventional romantic comedies of the past two or three decades, and perhaps more specifically, the works of Wes Anderson. While I wouldn’t argue categorically that Anderson was inspired directly by folks like Hal Ashby in his films, looking back at Ashby’s work, there are indisputable similarities which, at the very least, will give you a few more films to watch if you a feeling of whimsy, magic realism, and wistfulness that all sort of commingles in a bouillabaisse of melancholy celebration. And the release of Criterion’s gorgeous new Blu-ray for “Harold and Maude” inspires another look at one of the filmmaker’s greatest works, to see not only how it may have influenced a generation of filmmakers, but whether it remains as impactful and entertaining as when it was released.


The Facts:

Released December 20, 1971, “Harold and Maude,” perhaps for obvious reasons, was not immediately embraced; its combination of pitch-black humor, off-kilter romance, and anarchic counterculturalism didn’t have quite the same zeitgeist-grabbing appeal as films like Easy Rider or The Graduate. Though the film maintains an 85 percent fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, it largely lives on as a cult classic – it never made much money, and most of its critical recognition came decades later, without a lot of significant attention. That said, both of the film’s stars, Bud Cort and Ruth Gordon, earned acting nominations for their performances as the title characters, and “Harold and Maude” was eventually awarded several nods from AFI, who declared it their #9 comedy of all time.


What Still Works

First of all, as a comedy it works like gangbusters. The opening scene is a small marvel of misdirection as Harold goes through the quiet a solemn process of preparing to hang himself, and there’s an odd, cathartic and sweeping sense of humor that colors everything from that point on after his mother walks in the room, acknowledges him, and then proceeds to go about her business as if he wasn’t there. From there, his dry and melancholy humor permeates the film – or at least Harold’s interactions with his mother – which we soon realize is deeper and more meaningful that the pranksterism that it initially seems like. And when Maude enters the film, her devil-may-care attitude to living constantly amuses without ever becoming too sanctimonious, empowering Harold (and the audience) rather than scolding them.

What’s most remarkable about the dynamic between the two characters, however, is how each of their approaches to life is not merely comical, it’s substantive. In Harold’s case, he explains pretty clearly why he pursues these death re-enactments and fake suicide attempts, but Maude’s motivations for a free, exuberant and delightfully reckless life are left, well, slightly more ambiguous; notwithstanding the Auschwitz ID number tattooed on her arm, she is racing to leave behind a deep-rooted and powerful pain, and celebrating the freedom she currently enjoys by constantly flirting with danger, far beyond the limits of even safe mischief-making. The moment that stands out most to me is during the police chase, where she spins her car in a circle until the cop’s motorcycle falls over and stops working: even after she’s prevailed over her pursuer, she takes a victory lap – or maybe just an unsafe extra twist of the steering wheel – that makes the audience fear that she and Harold won’t get away, but it also feels integral to literally the core of who she is.

The element which seems to resonate perhaps less today but seems still incredibly vital is the film’s dynamic between living a life of freedom and deliberate choice, and adhering to the expectations or demands of a society which has its own expectations for you. Harold desperately seeks to undermine his mother’s controlling influence, because she exists in a universe where people do certain things because they are expected, or “normal” – which feels utterly foreign to Harold. All of which is why he becomes so attracted to Maude and her lifestyle: she embraces passion – for literally everything – and lives her life according to the pursuit of something meaningful and individualistic rather than simply conventional and accepted. And it’s in the chemistry of their opposite worlds and the emotional connection they share that the film achieves its deepest resonance, feeling romantic and evocative and powerful, even if you’re typically not inclined to indulge a May-December romance.


What Doesn’t Work

At 91 minutes, the movie moves so quickly there’s nothing to trim, no superfluous gags and all of the content works either to support the comedy or the relationships – and often both. Suffice it to say this is not a weakness or shortcoming of the film, but the only thing that even theoretically could be said as a criticism is that its humor is occasionally so bleak that it becomes simply too intense – the sort of thing that one does not joke about, or some might so, anyway.


The Verdict

“Harold and Maude” is a truly beautiful film, in addition to being hilarious, and it holds up as well today as it did then – perhaps even better. There seems to be even more of an existential crisis today among young people about the vast universe of possibilities in life, and how they struggle to avoid the paralysis of indecision is imminently relatable to Harold’s efforts to escape his mother’s controlling influence. On the other hand, Maude’s fearlessness is more attractive than ever, because it never quite subscribes to a single character or personality type, nor functions in the service of judging other people for their fear.

Finally, Maude’s position as a manic pixie dream girl is the one thing that really does feel indisputable about the film, which makes it more relevant than ever, as filmmakers continue to create romances between awkward, stilted young men and free-thinkers and –doers like her who let or enable them to loosen up and appreciate life. And more than that, it’s just a beautiful romance that reminds viewers that there’s someone out there for everyone — and who doesn’t want that?

IFC_FOD_TV_long_haired_businessmen_table

Hacked In

Funny or Die Is Taking Over

FOD TV comes to IFC every Saturday night.

Posted by on

via GIPHY

We’ve been fans of Funny or Die since we first met The Landlord. That enduring love makes it more than logical, then, that IFC is totally cool with FOD hijacking the airwaves every Saturday night. Yes, that’s happening.

The appropriately titled FOD TV looks like something pulled from public access television in the nineties. Like lo-fi broken-antenna reception and warped VHS tapes. Equal parts WTF and UHF.

Get ready for characters including The Shirtless Painter, Long-Haired Businessmen, and Pigeon Man. They’re aptly named, but for a better sense of what’s in store, here’s a taste of ASMR with Kelly Whispers:

Watch FOD TV every Saturday night during IFC’s regularly scheduled movies.

SAE_102_tout_2

Wicked Good

See More Evil

Stan Against Evil Season 1 is on Hulu.

Posted by on
GIFs via Giphy

Okay, so you missed the entire first season of Stan Against Evil. There’s no shame in that, per se. But here’s the thing: Season 2 is just around the corner and you don’t want to lag behind. After all, Season 1 had some critical character development, not to mention countless plot twists, and a breathless finale cliffhanger that’s been begging for resolution since last fall. It also had this:

via GIPHY

The good news is that you can catch up right now on Hulu. Phew. But if you aren’t streaming yet, here’s a basic primer…

Willards Mill Is Evil

Stan spent his whole career as sheriff oblivious to the fact that his town has a nasty curse. Mostly because his recently-deceased wife was secretly killing demons and keeping Stan alive.

Demons Really Want To Kill Stan

The curse on Willards Mill stipulates that damned souls must hunt and kill each and every town sheriff, or “constable.” Oh, and these demons are shockingly creative.

via GIPHY

They Also Want To Kill Evie

Why? Because Evie’s a sheriff too, and the curse on Willard’s Mill doesn’t have a “one at a time” clause. Bummer, Evie.

Stan and Evie Must Work Together

Beating the curse will take two, baby, but that’s easier said than done because Stan doesn’t always seem to give a damn. Damn!

via GIPHY

Beware of Goats

It goes without saying for anyone who’s seen the show: If you know that ancient evil wants to kill you, be wary of anything that has cloven feet.

via GIPHY

Season 2 Is Lurking

Scary new things are slouching towards Willards Mill. An impending darkness descending on Stan, Evie and their cohort – eviler evil, more demony demons, and whatnot. And if Stan wants to survive, he’ll have to get even Stanlier.

Stan Against Evil Season 1 is now streaming right now on Hulu.

IFC_ComedyCrib_ThePlaceWeLive_SeriesImage_web

SO EXCITED!!!

Reminders that the ’90s were a thing

"The Place We Live" is available for a Jessie Spano-level binge on Comedy Crib.

Posted by on
GIFs via Giphy

Unless you stopped paying attention to the world at large in 1989, you are of course aware that the ’90s are having their pop cultural second coming. Nobody is more acutely aware of this than Dara Katz and Betsy Kenney, two comedians who met doing improv comedy and have just made their Comedy Crib debut with the hilarious ’90s TV throwback series, The Place We Live.

IFC: How would you describe “The Place We Live” to a fancy network executive you just met in an elevator?

Dara: It’s everything you loved–or loved to hate—from Melrose Place and 90210 but condensed to five minutes, funny (on purpose) and totally absurd.

IFC: How would you describe “The Place We Live” to a drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?

Betsy: “Hey Todd, why don’t you have a sip of water. Also, I think you’ll love The Place We Live because everyone has issues…just like you, Todd.”

via GIPHY

IFC: When you were living through the ’90s, did you think it was television’s golden age or the pop culture apocalypse?


Betsy: I wasn’t sure I knew what it was, I just knew I loved it!


Dara: Same. Was just happy that my parents let me watch. But looking back, the ’90s honored The Teen. And for that, it’s the golden age of pop culture. 

IFC: Which ’90s shows did you mine for the series, and why?

Betsy: Melrose and 90210 for the most part. If you watch an episode of either of those shows you’ll see they’re a comedic gold mine. In one single episode, they cover serious crimes, drug problems, sex and working in a law firm and/or gallery, all while being young, hot and skinny.


Dara: And almost any series we were watching in the ’90s, Full House, Saved By the Bell, My So Called Life has very similar themes, archetypes and really stupid-intense drama. We took from a lot of places. 

via GIPHY

IFC: How would you describe each of the show’s characters in terms of their ’90s TV stereotype?

Dara: Autumn (Sunita Mani) is the femme fatale. Robin (Dara Katz) is the book worm (because she wears glasses). Candace (Betsy Kenney) is Corey’s twin and gives great advice and has really great hair. Corey (Casey Jost) is the boy next door/popular guy. Candace and Corey’s parents decided to live in a car so the gang can live in their house. 
Lee (Jonathan Braylock) is the jock.

IFC: Why do you think the world is ready for this series?

Dara: Because everyone’s feeling major ’90s nostalgia right now, and this is that, on steroids while also being a totally new, silly thing.

Delight in the whole season of The Place We Live right now on IFC’s Comedy Crib. It’ll take you back in all the right ways.