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“The Avengers” has two post-credit scenes, mystery actor revealed

Chris Evans in The Avengers

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With only two days left until “The Avengers” hits theaters (or a day and a half if you’re going to be headed to a midnight release Thursday night), many people are hotly discussing the direction the Marvel movie franchise will head in after this flick hits theaters. The post-credits sequences — yes, plural — will largely set that up, and we have two interesting spoilery nuggets of information that should help us get a sense of what we can expect in the future.

First up, we finally have confirmation that there will be two post-credits sequences during “The Avengers.” Movies.com writer Christopher Campbell confirmed to ComicBookMovie.com that he saw a second scene during a screening of the movie last night. It’s assumedly the new scene that was filled after the “Avengers” world premiere back in April.

Without giving too much away, Robert Downey Jr. makes a comment toward the end of “The Avengers” about wanting to get shawarma after the big battle is open. The dialogue-less second post-credits scene lasts for about a minute and shows the whole gang eating shawarma in full costume. Once you see the movie, you’ll realize how fantastic this is.

The second new fact about the “Avengers” post-credits sequences is about the first one. Huge spoiler here, but at the end of the flick we see that the Mad Titan who goes by the name of Thanos is the man behind Loki’s return to Earth. This foreshadows a greater conflict that will likely be dealt with in the inevitable “The Avengers 2.”

But while many just assumed that Thanos was entirely CGI, it turns out that he was actually played by an actor named Damion Poitier. He has worked with Joss Whedon in the past in his shows “Firefly” and “Dollhouse,” so that’s likely how he got the role. It will be interesting to see if he gets to keep it once the Thanos tease pays off in a future movie.

Directed by Joss Whedon, “The Avengers” stars Robert Downey Jr., Mark Ruffalo, Chris Evans, Chris Hemsworth, Samuel L. Jackson, Tom Hiddleston, Scarlett Johansson, Jeremy Renner and Cobie Smulders. It’s due in theaters on May 4.

Are you happy about the two post-credits scenes? Tell us in the comments section below or on Facebook and Twitter!

Soap tv show

As the Spoof Turns

15 Hilarious Soap Opera Parodies

Catch the classic sitcom Soap Saturday mornings on IFC.

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Photo Credit: Columbia Pictures Television

The soap opera is the indestructible core of television fandom. We celebrate modern series like The Wire and Breaking Bad with their ongoing storylines, but soap operas have been tangling more plot threads than a quilt for decades. Which is why pop culture enjoys parodying them so much.

Check out some of the funniest soap opera parodies below, and be sure to catch Soap Saturday mornings on IFC.

1. Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman

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Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman was a cult hit soap parody from the mind of Norman Lear that poked daily fun at the genre with epic twists and WTF moments. The first season culminated in a perfect satire of ratings stunts, with Mary being both confined to a psychiatric facility and chosen to be part of a Nielsen ratings family.


2. IKEA Heights

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IKEA Heights proves that the soap opera is alive and well, even if it has to be filmed undercover at a ready-to-assemble furniture store totally unaware of what’s happening. This unique webseries brought the classic formula to a new medium. Even IKEA saw the funny side — but has asked that future filmmakers apply through proper channels.


3. Fresno

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When you’re parodying ’80s nighttime soaps like Dallas and Dynasty , everything about your show has to equally sumptuous. The 1986 CBS miniseries Fresno delivered with a high-powered cast (Carol Burnett, Teri Garr and more in haute couture clothes!) locked in the struggle for the survival of a raisin cartel.


4. Soap

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Soap was the nighttime response to daytime soap operas: a primetime skewering of everything both silly and satisfying about the source material. Plots including demonic possession and alien abduction made it a cult favorite, and necessitated the first televised “viewer discretion” disclaimer. It also broke ground for featuring one of the first gay characters on television in the form of Billy Crystal’s Jodie Dallas. Revisit (or discover for the first time) this classic sitcom every Saturday morning on IFC.


5. Too Many Cooks

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Possibly the most perfect viral video ever made, Too Many Cooks distilled almost every style of television in a single intro sequence. The soap opera elements are maybe the most hilarious, with more characters and sudden shocking twists in an intro than most TV scribes manage in an entire season.


6. Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace

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Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace was more mockery than any one medium could handle. The endless complications of Darkplace Hospital are presented as an ongoing horror soap opera with behind-the-scenes anecdotes from writer, director, star, and self-described “dreamweaver visionary” Garth Marenghi and astoundingly incompetent actor/producer Dean Learner.


7. “Attitudes and Feelings, Both Desirable and Sometimes Secretive,” MadTV

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Soap opera connoisseurs know that the most melodramatic plots are found in Korea. MADtv‘s parody Tae Do  (translation: Attitudes and Feelings, Both Desirable and Sometimes Secretive) features the struggles of mild-mannered characters with far more feelings than their souls, or subtitles, could ever cope with.


8. Twin Peaks

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Twin Peaks, the twisted parody of small town soaps like Peyton Place whose own creator repeatedly insists is not a parody, has endured through pop culture since it changed television forever when it debuted in 1990. The show even had it’s own soap within in a soap called…


9. “Invitation to Love,” Twin Peaks

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Twin Peaks didn’t just parody soap operas — it parodied itself parodying soap operas with the in-universe show Invitation to Love. That’s more layers of deceit and drama than most televised love triangles.


10. “As The Stomach Turns,” The Carol Burnett Show

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The Carol Burnett Show poked fun at soaps with this enduring take on As The World Turns. In a case of life imitating art, one story involving demonic possession would go on to happen for “real” on Days of Our Lives.


11. Days of our Lives (Friends Edition)

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Still airing today, Days of Our Lives is one of the most famous soap operas of all time. They’re also excellent sports, as they allowed Friends star Joey Tribbiani to star as Dr Drake Ramoray, the only doctor to date his own stalker (while pretending to be his own evil twin). And then return after a brain-transplant.

And let’s not forget the greatest soap opera parody line ever written: “Come on Joey, you’re going up against a guy who survived his own cremation!”


12. Acorn Antiques

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First appearing on the BBC sketch comedy series Victoria Wood As Seen on TV, Acorn Antiques combines almost every low-budget soap opera trope into one amazing whole. The staff of a small town antique store suffer a disproportional number of amnesiac love-triangles, while entire storylines suddenly appear and disappear without warning or resolution. Acorn Antiques was so popular, it went on to become a hit West End musical.


13. “Point Place,” That 70s Show

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In a memorable That ’70s Show episode, an unemployed Red is reduced to watching soaps all day. He becomes obsessed despite the usual Red common-sense objections (like complaining that it’s impossible to fall in love with someone in a coma). His dreams render his own life as Point Place, a melodramatic nightmare where Kitty leaves him because he’s unemployed. (Click here to see all airings of That ’70s Show on IFC.)


14. The Spoils of Babylon

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Bursting from the minds of Will Ferrell and creators Andrew Steele and Matt Piedmont, The Spoils of Babylon was a spectacular parody of soap operas and epic mini-series like The Thorn Birds. Taking the parody even further, Ferrell himself played Eric Jonrosh, the author of the book on which the series was based. Jonrosh returned in The Spoils Before Dying, a jazzy murder mystery with its own share of soapy twists and turns.

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15. All My Children Finale, SNL

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SNL‘s final celebration of one of the biggest soaps of all time is interrupted by a relentless series of revelations from stage managers, lighting designers, make-up artists, and more. All of whom seem to have been married to or murdered by (or both) each other.

5 Things We Love About “The Avengers,” No Spoilers

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The Avengers” hits theaters this weekend, uniting solo-film superheroes Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, and Hulk on the same screen in a cinematic team-up of epic proportions.

You can read my spoiler-free early review of “The Avengers” that went up earlier this week, but just in case you’re still on the fence about Marvel’s blockbuster (and because I enjoyed it so much I still have lots to say about it), I came up with a list of five elements — free of spoilers — that really stood out as the high achievements of Joss Whedon’s new superhero adventure.


What They Say & How They Say It

We’ve come to expect clever, quirky dialogue from Whedon’s projects, but there was some concern early on that his style might not mesh with the established tone of the films that preceded “The Avengers.” All that worry was laid to rest about five minutes into “The Avengers,” though, as the characters have only gotten better under Whedon’s guiding eye. It’s no small feat to make the conversational moments in a film like this just as interesting as the action scenes, but co-writers Whedon and Zak Penn have done just that, and given fans quite a bit of cheer-worthy material that doesn’t involve any smashing, flying, or trading punches. Some of the scenes featuring Loki (Tom Hiddleston) and Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) are particularly great, though it’s Loki’s scene with a different character that really stole the show. You’ll know it when you see it, trust me.


The Incredible Hulk

Edward who? I enjoyed “The Incredible Hulk” and Edward Norton’s portrayal of Dr. Bruce Banner, the mild-mannered scientist who becomes a raging behemoth when he gets stressed out, but the Hulk of “The Avengers” is by far the best version of Marvel’s green giant that I’ve seen on the big screen so far. As Norton’s replacement, Ruffalo does a nice job of making us forget that he’s the third actor to play Bruce Banner in the last 10 years, and his scenes alongside Downey and the rest of the “Avengers” cast are some of the film’s best moments. I’ve never been a big fan of Hulk as a character, but if I had to identify one breakout character in “The Avengers,” it would be Hulk — and if I had to choose my favorite scene in the film, it would involve Hulk and Loki. That says a lot.


The Hero/Villain Permutations

Early on, I tried to keep track of all the different ways the “Avengers” creative team combined the various heroes and villains in the film, from the inevitable fights between the good guys to their super-powered, cooperative attacks on the bad guys. I stopped about halfway through the movie, as the list just got too long. Basically, if there’s a combination you wanted to see in the film, you’ll get it. What’s more, all of the team-ups (and brawls) feel organic to the story, which is something that can’t be said of many other films that feature a cast of characters this large and this high-profile.


The Trickster God

I said it in my review of “The Avengers” and I’ll say it again: the smartest move Marvel made for “The Avengers” was to bring back Tom Hiddleston as Loki. From the moment the god of mischief appears on the screen to his final scenes in the film, Hiddleston embodies everything a live-action version of the character should be. And while we got a taste of how good he was in the role during “Thor,” his role in “The Avengers” gives him an opportunity to play off actors like Downey and Samuel L. Jackson — and it’s an understatement to say he simply holds his own. Hiddleston manages to combine the great Shakespearean elements of the character with a sense of bitter malevolence that makes him a pitch-perfect villain for the team to tackle, and I can’t help hoping to see more of him in future Marvel movies.


The Post-Credits Scene

Naturally, I won’t spoil anything about the scene here. Just know that the now-expected post-credits scene signals big things for the Marvel movie-verse in the years to come, and the introduction of one of the Avengers — nay, the entire Marvel universe’s — greatest villains.

How psyched are you to see “The Avengers”? Let us know in the comments below.

“The Avengers” review: Impressions of a Marvel masterpiece

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Four years ago today, “Iron Man” arrived in theaters and kicked off a bold, long-term plan (by Hollywood standards, at least) that would see four different Marvel superheroes appear in their own solo movies, then unite in a single film featuring not just all of the previous films’ stars, but many of their supporting cast, too.

It was a plan that seemed to disregard the inevitable clash of egos and all of the other behind-the-scenes elements that often doom a franchise before it gets started. And because of that, it was a plan everyone wanted to succeed, but quietly expected to become another ambitious failure.

Yet here we are, four years to the day after Robert Downey Jr. became the living embodiment of armored superhero Tony Stark, and “The Avengers” is riding a wave of positive buzz as it approaches the finish line and its long-awaited premiere.

Even more unbelievable, though, is that despite all of the odds against it and the stratospheric expectations heaped upon it, “The Avengers” still manages to not only live up to those expectations, but to exceed them with an epic adventure that’s just as impressive as its larger-than-life characters.

Chris Hemsworth and Chris Evans in 'The Avengers'

For a film that required so many prologues to get to this point, it’s surprising how little up-front exposition is required to bring newcomers up to speed with “The Avengers” universe. While the film clearly assumes some familiarity with the main characters and a few basic plot points of the preceding films (“Iron Man,” “The Incredible Hulk,” “Thor,” “Iron Man 2,” and “Captain America: The First Avenger”), co-writers Joss Whedon and Zak Penn have done a great job of weaving any necessary information into the early portions of the film and making the exposition feel organic.

The premise of “The Avengers” is this: Thor’s evil brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) has returned, and he plans to use the Tesseract (the powerful, glowing blue cube last seen in “Captain America”) to take over Earth. When Loki proves too powerful for Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) and S.H.I.E.L.D. to take down on their own, all of the characters from the previous Marvel Studios films team up to defeat Loki and the alien horde helping him.

It’s a plot that seems laughably old-school in its simplicity, but its genius lies in how this bare-bones narrative foundation allows the film’s talented cast and creative team the room to do what they do best.

A scene from The Avengers

From start to finish, “The Avengers” is a film that draws heavily from classic comic-book tropes. An early misunderstanding has the heroes fighting each other before they eventually realize that they’re on the same side, and the combination of personalities on the team has the expected oil-and-water chemistry. As in all good crossovers, they eventually put aside their differences and cooperate for the common good (in this case, saving the Earth).

It’s the sort of adventure that comic fans are accustomed to seeing in print, but just like the best comics, “The Avengers” truly shines in how it fills out its narrative skeleton and the area around these tropes with vibrant storytelling, compelling character development, and moments filled with so much heart – and humor – that the entire package stands on its own.

Initially, what’s most surprising (though in hindsight, not very surprising at all) is how well director Joss Whedon’s focus on dialogue, humor, and character development drive the film forward and make the moments without action just as enjoyable and interesting as the action sequences. At times, it’s hard to tell where Downey’s clever repartee as Tony Stark ends and Whedon’s influence on the character begins, but it’s easy to see the writer/director’s signature all over Mark Ruffalo’s version of Bruce Banner and – more noticeably – his green alter ego, Hulk.

With Hulk, Whedon somehow manages to find the sweet spot between the raging, uncontrollable behemoth of the 2008 film and a new side of the character that makes him the source of some of the film’s funniest moments. This new dynamic is presented as a natural evolution of Bruce Banner’s relationship with the beast inside of him, and Whedon finds a humor-rich vein to mine in the creature’s lack of impulse control and primitive take on the events transpiring around him.

Marvel’s wise decision to bring back Tom Hiddleston as Loki also pays off in a big way, and the British actor not only holds his own against the film’s cast of heavy-hitters, but draws your attention every moment he’s on screen, oozing with all of the charisma you’d expect from the god of mischief. At times, he’s almost too good, as his scenes with Chris Evans make Captain America seem, well… a little bland in comparison.

Thankfully, for every scene featuring Loki and Captain America, there’s another that puts Loki and Tony Stark in the same room and lets Hiddleston and Downey put on a two-man show as trickster god and narcissistic genius, respectively.

Samuel L. Jackson in The Avengers

It’s worth noting that “The Avengers” doesn’t fail to appease on the fan-service side, either. Over the course of the film, nearly every permutation of hero and villain finds its way to the screen at one point or another, and Whedon masterfully balances the roles each character plays in the big-picture story. Much was made of the dynamic between Captain America and Iron Man in the run-up to the film, with fans wondering how the two characters could possibly share the same screen. “The Avengers” director makes it seem easy, though, and neither Captain America nor Iron Man – nor Hulk or Thor, for that matter – feel relegated to supporting roles.

The most important takeaway from “The Avengers,” however, seems to be the film’s triumph as a comic-book movie that defies the trend toward dark and gritty superhero stories.

Where many films adapted from comic books have kept things at street level, “The Avengers” soars through the air at every opportunity and chooses bright, witty, and unabashedly heroic over dark, grim, and conflicted. Possibly the greatest compliment that can be paid to “The Avengers,” however, is that the film comes the closest of any recent superhero movies to capturing that sense of wonder and spectacle that first turned many kids into lifelong comics fans.

Yes, on top of all the expectations the film lives up to and all of the obstacles it overcame to get to this point, “The Avengers” greatest accomplishment could be this: its ability to make an entire audience feel like children reading their favorite comic for the very first time. It’s a quality that precious few comic book movies seem to capture these days, so let’s hope it’s enough to make audiences assemble for “The Avengers.”

“The Avengers” hits theaters May 4.

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