DID YOU READ

Adapt This: “The Avengers: Kree-Skrull War”

avengers kree-skrull war

Posted by on

With Hollywood turning more of its attention to the world of graphic novels for inspiration, I’ll cast the spotlight on a new comic book each week that has the potential to pack a theater or keep you glued to your television screens. At the end of some “Adapt This” columns, you’ll also find thoughts from various comic creators and other industry experts about the books they’d like to see make the jump from page to screen.


This Week’s Book: The Avengers: Kree-Skrull War by Roy Thomas (w), Sal Buscema (a), Neal Adams (a), and John Buscema (a)

The Premise: The Avengers find themselves caught up in a war between two alien races that spills over to Earth, forcing the heroes to fight a war on three fronts — battling the aliens, the frightened people they’re sworn to protect, and the differences between their own values. As the team’s members try to rally and unite against their common foe, their allegiance is questioned when they attempt to protect one of their own, who just happens to be a member of one of the alien races at war.

The Pitch: With all the buzz surrounding “The Avengers” right now, it makes sense to look at some of the existing stories that could serve as the basis for future films. This early-’70s story arc is widely regarded as one of the best ever written for Earth’s Mightiest Heroes, and allowed some heavy political and social issues of the time to be viewed through the lens of the Marvel Comics universe.

While the details of the story would need to be heavily reworked with regard to the team’s roster and the main characters in order to bring it more in line with Marvel’s cinematic universe, there’s no reason the fundamental themes and questions raised by “Kree-Skrull War” couldn’t make the transition with a modern-era update.

The easiest way of doing so would be to present the war as a conflict between Thor’s people and one of the other alien races revealed in the franchise so far (the Frost Giants or Chitauri, perhaps), and the rest of the pieces should fall into place. However, with an unspecified number of years and at least three movies between now and the start of filming for the “Avengers” sequel, there’s ample time to introduce a few new alien races to the mix such as the Kree or Skrulls. “The Avengers” director Joss Whedon has already proven he can pull off the alien-invasion angle, so upping the ante with two new alien races seems like a natural step.

With a film based on “Kree-Skrull War,” there’s also a nice opportunity to develop the characters of some of the chief players in the Avengers — especially Iron Man, Captain America, and Nick Fury. The story offers some nice “Civil War”-like potential in the way Iron Man and Captain America react to both the alien threat and the way the Avengers’ role in dealing with the aliens is perceived by the public.

For example, Captain America wouldn’t seem too far off-base to side with the government and take a wartime view on engaging both the aliens and each race’s respective allies here on Earth. Iron Man, on the other hand, would seem a natural fit for the opposing viewpoint, and take a skeptical view on the rights sacrificed by a frightened public and their government. And much like the comic-book arc, Nick Fury and S.H.I.E.L.D. would find themselves caught in the middle of the controversy, torn between their obligations to the government and The Avengers team they helped create.

The Closing Argument: While the post-credits scene in “The Avengers” hints at taking the next chapter in a different direction, adapting “Kree-Skrull War” offers a chance to give all of the same action and effects-driven adventure elements a backbone in serious, real-world issues. Bringing a story like this into the Avengers universe feels like a natural evolution of the over-arching Marvel movie-verse narrative, with the first chapter of “The Avengers” serving as an introduction, and the next chapter looking at how the team functions together over the long term and the way it’s perceived by the rest of the world (and in this case, the universe).


Would “Kree-Skrull War” make a good movie? Chime in below or on Facebook or Twitter.

Watch More
Brockmire-103-banner-4

Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

Posted by on

He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

Watch More
Brockmire_101_tout_2

Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

Posted by on
GIFS via Giphy

On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

Watch More
Brockmire-Sam-Adams-great-effing-beer

Draught Pick

Sam Adams “Keeps It Brockmire”

All New Brockmire airs Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

Posted by on

From baseball to beer, Jim Brockmire calls ’em like he sees ’em.

via GIPHY

It’s no wonder at all, then, that Sam Adams would reach out to Brockmire to be their shockingly-honest (and inevitably short-term) new spokesperson. Unscripted and unrestrained, he’ll talk straight about Sam—and we’ll take his word. Check out this new testimonial for proof:

See more Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC, presented by Samuel Adams. Good f***** beer.

Watch More
Powered by ZergNet