DID YOU READ

The top five talent agent scenes in movies

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Where would a man be without his agent? He’d be lost in the jungle (sometimes literally), wondering how all this anarchy and madness came into being. Here are some of our favorite scenes that depict the often complex but almost always beautiful relationship between an agent and his client.


Martin Short in “The Big Picture” (1989)

“The Big Picture” could be seen as the scrappy prelude to Robert Altman’s “The Player” with its story of Nick Chapman (Kevin Bacon), an up-and-coming film director who gets plunged into the madness of Hollywood following the acclaim of his Academy Award-winning student short film. Like Steve Martin’s “L.A. Story” (which was released two years later), “The Big Picture” takes place in a bizarro-alt-world Los Angeles filled with hustlers, creeps and weirdos (a portrayal that could be argued ends up being more realistic than surrealistic), with Martin Short making a rather amusing uncredited appearance as fey talent agent Neil Sussman, with whom Nick “does lunch.” Short’s obviously having a blast, and the feeling is infectious — we especially like his final exchange with the waiter, who’s quick with a detailed and eloquent description of a fellow restaurant patron.


Tom Cruise in “Jerry Maguire” (1996)

“Jerry Maguire” might be writer-director Cameron Crowe’s crowning achievement (next to “Say Anything”) due to its endlessly quotable screenplay and terrific performances by Tom Cruise as Maguire, a pushing-40 sports agent who suddenly has a crisis of conscience about the inherent moral corruption of the industry he works in, and Cuba Gooding Jr. as Rod Tidwell, the Arizona Cardinals wide receiver who’s disgruntled with his current contract. Never has there been an agent-client relationship that was more inspiring as they take on the system with a determination to make a difference in their respective fields — and it all begins in a locker room (“Towel?” “No, I air dry.”).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmj3IaB2NcE


Sydney Pollack in “Tootsie” (1982)

This hilarious exchange between long-suffering agent George Fields (played, appropriately enough, by “Tootsie” director Sydney Pollack) and his client, difficult method actor Michael Dorsey (Dustin Hoffman), might not be as “iconic” as the “Help Me Help You” scene between Tom Cruise and Cuba Gooding Jr. in “Jerry Maguire,” but it’s pretty close. Pollack is spot-on perfect in the role, immediately exasperated the second Hoffman walks into the room — as is, apparently, the person whom Pollack was talking to on the phone, who hangs up either on purpose or by accident (“Look what you did!”). Hey, we also might argue that a tomato wouldn’t necessarily ever sit down — “logic” has to apply to fruit, too.


Matthew McConaughey in “Tropic Thunder” (2008)

It’s always good to see Matthew McConaughey do comedy — he’s a great dramatic actor, too, but a part of us will always see him as Wooderson, the eternal admirer of trapped-in-time high school girls, from “Dazed and Confused.” The role of Rick Peck was originally intended for director-star Ben Stiller’s “Zoolander” pal, Owen Wilson (you can kind of tell — there’s something distinctly Owen Wilson-ish about Peck’s dialogue), but McConaughey makes it his own just fine, balancing the agent’s fast-talking industry speak with an inherent sweetness that comes from the fact that he’s hopelessly in love with his client, aging action star Tugg Speedman (Stiller), whom he affectionately refers to as “Tugboat.” One thing’s for sure — Peck has the best office, like, ever.


Ron Livingston in “Adaptation” (2002)

Ron Livingston’s first contribution to the conversation between him and his neurotic screenwriting client, Charlie Kaufman (Nicolas Cage), could’ve been his only line in the movie and he still would’ve stolen the entire thing from a heavyweight cast that also includes Meryl Streep, Chris Cooper and Brian Cox. Livingston’s Marty Bowen (who’s based, at least in name, on Kaufman’s real-life agent) is a spot-on caricature of what most people think talent agents must be like — id-driven, narcissistic and almost endearingly clueless/distracted. The fact that Cage’s Kaufman has no response whatsoever to his agent’s random revelation about a female co-worker makes it even funnier.


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Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

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He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

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On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

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Draught Pick

Sam Adams “Keeps It Brockmire”

All New Brockmire airs Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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From baseball to beer, Jim Brockmire calls ’em like he sees ’em.

via GIPHY

It’s no wonder at all, then, that Sam Adams would reach out to Brockmire to be their shockingly-honest (and inevitably short-term) new spokesperson. Unscripted and unrestrained, he’ll talk straight about Sam—and we’ll take his word. Check out this new testimonial for proof:

See more Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC, presented by Samuel Adams. Good f***** beer.

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