DID YOU READ

“Beetlejuice 2″ writer has met with Michael Keaton, says it’s a “priority” film

021312_beetlejuice

Posted by on

Tim Burton is not a director to create sequels to his earlier success stories for the hell of it. So that’s why the news last year that he is endorsing the script for “Beetlejuice 2″ and wants Michael Keaton to star in it actually seemed like a pretty decent idea. “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” screenwriter Seth Grahame-Smith and David Katzenberg are currently working on a script for the project, meaning the long-rumored film may actually see the light of day.

ShockTillYouDrop got a chance to talk to Grahame-Smith recently while he was promoting “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” and asked him about the chances of “Beetlejuice 2″ becoming a reality. Apparently they’re actually pretty high, as he’s already been conducting some major meetings with the film’s intended talent.

“It’s a reality in the sense that I met with Michael Keaton last week,” Grahame-Smith said. “We talked for a couple of hours and talked about big picture stuff. It’s a priority for Warner Bros. It’s a priority for Tim. Right now, I am writing an animated movie for Tim based on an idea of mine. Then I adapt ‘Unholy Night’ [based on the upcoming book]. The third I am hoping is ‘Beetlejuice’ in terms of writing schedule.”

As for Keaton’s interest in the project, Grahame-Smith said that his excitement level is “huge.”

“He’s been wanting to do it for 20 years and he’ll talk to anybody about it who will listen,” he said. “I really told him, I have a huge reverence for Tim and a huge reverence for that film in general. I don’t think we should do it if we shit on the legacy. He agrees. So, right now, it remains to be seen, I have a couple of story ideas, but we’re very early out.”

Would you want to see Michael Keaton reprise his title role in “Beetlejuice 2″? Tell us in the comments section below or on Facebook and Twitter.

Jackie That 70s Show

Jackie Oh!

15 That ’70s Show Quotes to Help You Unleash Your Inner Jackie

Catch That '70s Show Mondays and Tuesdays from 6-10P on IFC.

Posted by on
Photo Credit: Carsey-Werner Company

When life gets you down, just ask yourself: what would Jackie do? (But don’t ask her, because she doesn’t care about your stupid problems.) Before you catch That ’70s Show on IFC, take a look at some quotes that will help you be the best Jackie you can be.


15. She knows her strengths.

Carsey-Werner Productions


14. She doesn’t let a little thing like emotions get in the way.

Carsey-Werner Productions


13. She’s her own best friend.

Jackie 3


12. She has big plans for her future.

Carsey-Werner Productions


11. She keeps her ego in check.

Carsey-Werner Productions


10. She can really put things in perspective.

Carsey-Werner Productions


9. She’s a lover…

Jackie 7


8. But she knows not to just throw her love around.

Carsey-Werner Productions


7. She’s proud of her accomplishments.

Jackie 9


6. She knows her place in the world.

Carsey-Werner Productions


5. She asks herself the hard questions.

Carsey-Werner Productions


4. She takes care of herself.

Carsey-Werner Productions


3. She’s deep.

Carsey-Werner Productions


2. She’s a problem solver.

Carsey-Werner Productions


1. And she’s always modest.

Carsey-Werner Productions

The 7 best unproduced Batman screenplays (and what happened)

010912_batman

Posted by on

Not every vision of The Dark Knight has seen the light of day. Here are a few Batman film projects that never got out of the Batcave, from Tim Burton’s proposed third installment to Darren Aronofsky’s much-hyped “Batman: Year One” to a Batman vs. Superman mash-up (the logo of which can be spotted amongst the post-apocalyptic NYC ruins of “I Am Legend”).


1. “Batman” by Tom Mankiewicz

What Was It: An unproduced 1983 script written by Tom Mankiewicz, the screenwriter of no less than three James Bond movies and who had an uncredited hand in the scripts for both “Superman” and “Superman II,” chronicles a fairly familiar origin story for the Caped Crusader (Bruce Wayne’s parents get killed and he wanders aimlessly for a bit before discovering his true calling as a superhero) and features his eventual team-up with Robin and clashing with the Joker. The script had a certain amount of what Richard Donner called the “verisimilitude” of the original “Superman” but also contained some of the whiz-bang-pow campiness of the television series, particularly after Batman and Robin join forces and take on the Joker’s men en masse.

What Happened: Nothing happened — Warner Bros. wouldn’t be quite ready to commit to an at least semi-serious live-action Batman movie for several more years. The final “Batman” script came from Warren Skaaren and Sam Hamm for the 1989 film directed by Tim Burton, while Mankiewicz went on to write “Ladyhawke” (which starred the future Catwoman, Michelle Pfeiffer) and “Dragnet.”


2. Tim Burton’s “Batman 3″

What Was It: There are different levels as to the “reality” of this supposed project depending on who you talk to, so take everything here with a grain of salt. Legend hath it that Tim Burton developed a concept for the third “Batman” film following “Batman Returns” that would’ve featured the Dark Knight taking on the Riddler, a criminal mastermind with his head shaved in the shape of a question mark, and teaming up with an orphan named Robin. The door was left open for Catwoman to make an appearance, as she survived the events of “Returns.” Marlon Wayans was apparently signed on to play Robin and even did some costume tests, with Rene Russo cast as Bruce Wayne’s love interest.

What Happened: Warner Bros. freaked when they found out the tone of the third film was going to be similar to that of the ultra-dark and melancholy “Batman Returns,” and Burton left the franchise, followed shortly thereafter by Michael Keaton. Joel Schumacher was hired to take over the series and he scrapped most of Burton’s ideas, though the Riddler and Robin would both end up appearing in “Batman Forever.” Rene Russo was deemed too old to be Val Kilmer’s love interest and was replaced by Nicole Kidman, and Wayans was apparently paid a lot of money to not be in the movie.


3. “Batman Triumphant” by Mark Protosevich

What Was It: The proposed fifth film in the franchise following “Batman & Robin,” “Triumphant” had Gotham’s crimefighting duo taking on the Scarecrow, with Jack Nicholson even rumored to portray the Joker in a hallucination sequence brought on by the Scarecrow’s fear toxin. Harley Quinn was also set to appear as the Joker’s daughter, seeking revenge against the Dark Knight for the death of dear old dad. Nicolas Cage, Steve Buscemi, Ewan McGregor and Jeff Goldblum were all rumored to be in the running to play the Scarecrow, with Madonna as Joel Schumacher’s first choice for Harley.

What Happened: “Batman & Robin” happened. The critical and commercial failure of that appalling disaster (and George Clooney’s vow to never don the cape and cowl again) prompted Warner Bros. to scrap the “Batman Triumphant” script and start looking for ways to reboot the franchise. This would prompt years of false starts and developmental hell until we finally got the definitive live-action Batman film in 2005: “Batman Begins.”


4. “Batman: DarKnight” by Lee Shapiro and Stephen Wise

What Was It: Another proposed fifth entry in the “Batman” series was this awkwardly-titled screenplay that brought back some of the old Tim Burton doom and gloom. In this version, Bruce Wayne was in self-imposed exile, discouraged over losing Batman’s mystique and ability to inspire fear in his enemies (maybe he shouldn’t host auctions and flash his “Batman Forever” credit card in public, then). Dick Grayson is attending Gotham University, where Dr. Jonathan Crane is conducting his experiments with fear. Crane’s vengeful run-in with a colleague, Dr. Kirk Langstrom, prompts the latter’s transformation into the terrifying mutant, Man-Bat.

What Happened: Joel Schumacher was set to direct this darker tale of the Dark Knight after Warner Bros. passed on “Batman Triumphant,” but “DarKnight” ended up being scrapped as well. A Scarecrow/Man-Bat story is definitely enticing (especially with word that Terrence Stamp was being approached for the latter role), but not on Schumacher’s watch.

Five Tim Burton Movies We Love

Five Tim Burton Movies We Love (photo)

Posted by on

Tonight at 10:15 p.m. ET we are showing Tim Burton’s “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.” Starring Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham Carter, Burton’s adaptation of Stephen Sondheim’s Broadway smash musical, is twisted, dark, and demented. Which is exactly why we love it.

When Tim Burton is behind the camera he makes dark magic happen on screen. Whether he’s directing “Batman” or “Beetlejuice” (or the “Beetlejuice” sequel), Johnny Depp or Jack Nicholson, aliens or Frankenweenies, animation or live action, Burton’s vision is clear. His movies are so distinctly his own, there’s never mistaking a Burton production for, say, a Scorsese. And there’s not a one of them that’s not fantastic, fun, and always the best thing to watch.

We like a challenge — and an argument — so here are our five favorite Tim Burton movies. What are yours?

5. “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street”

4. “Peewee’s Big Adventure”

3. “Beetlejuice”

2. “The Nightmare Before Christmas”

1. “Edward Scissorhands”

“Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street” airs tonight at 10:15 p.m. ET;
Friday, Nov. 18 at 3 a.m. ET; Monday, Nov. 28 at 8 p.m. ET; Tuesday, Nov. 29 at 12:30 a.m. ET; and Saturday, Dec. 10 at 3:30 a.m. ET

Powered by ZergNet