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Kenneth Lonergan reveals just which cut of “Margaret” got released

Kenneth Lonergan reveals just which cut of “Margaret” got released (photo)

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After six years and three lawsuits, Kenneth Lonergan‘s “Margaret” finally opened in theaters earlier this fall. And after less than $50,000 at the box office, it closed, quickly and quietly. But a funny thing happened to poor little “Margaret” — who, if you go by the film, pronounces her name “Mar-Gar-ETTE” — on the way to obscurity: its fans haven’t let it be forgotten.

Though many of the first wave of critics to see “Margaret” wrote it off, perhaps because they were understandably distracted by the details of its notoriously protracted post-production, a second wave of reviewers found the film to be a brilliant (if very messy) slice of life in post-9/11 New York City (you can find my very positive review, written about a week after the film opened, here). With the film opening this week in England to almost universal ecstatic praise, people are talking about “Margaret” again. Some folks, myself included, think the film has a real shot at placing highly in the annual indiewire and Village Voice film critics polls, if only enough people could see it. And that’s been the problem: you couldn’t. Fox Searchlight pulled the film from theaters after four weeks of release and hadn’t scheduled any screenings for critics for year-end awards consideration.

That’s why film critic Jaime Christley launched an online petition, aimed at getting Searchlight to screen the film for members of the press. At almost 500 signatures and counting — pretty remarkable, given that there aren’t 500 employed film critics in the entire world, which means a lot of hardcore cinephiles are supporting this movement too — there’s already a lot of people on what’s being dubbed #teamMargaret. And they’re getting results too: Searchlight’s already scheduled press screenings in several major markets, with more supposedly to come.

#teamMargaret also led to a fine piece of reporting by Mary Pols of Time, who decided to track Lonergan down and interview him about the film and about its groundswell of online support. And she wrote a really good piece too, despite the fact that Lonergan, still a defendant in a lawsuit over the film, had to conduct the interview within earshot of his attorney. She also scored some interesting info regarding exactly which cut of the film unspooled in theaters.

To explain a convoluted backstory as unconvolutedly as possible: Lonergan could never finish editing the movie to his satisfaction, which led to all sorts of legal battles between him and the producers over the control of the picture. It’s been unclear which version of the movie audiences saw, a fact Lonergan clarified in a statement to Pols:

“I support this Cut wholeheartedly and want people to see and like it, because the actors deserve to be seen and appreciated for their amazing work. But while I fully support the released Cut, it’s also no secret that I tried to get a subsequent version released, which Marty Scorsese very graciously helped with, which even more fully executes my complete intentions — a cut that I still hope will someday, somehow see the light of day.”

All right so it’s not the director’s cut, which apparently was also the same cut that Martin Scorsese worked on (previously, it had been rumored that Scorsese had edited his own separate cut of the film). Which begs the question: when are we going to see that version of the movie? Looks like #teamMargaret still has its work cut out for them.

Did you catch “Margaret” in theaters? Do you think it’s one of the best movies of the year? Tell us in the comments below or write to us on Facebook and Twitter.

Danzig-Portlandia-604-web

Face Melting Cameos

The 10 Most Metal Pop Culture Cameos

Glenn Danzig drops by Portlandia tonight at 10P on IFC.

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Glenn Danzig rocks harder than granite. In his 60 years, he’s mastered punk with The Misfits, slayed metal with the eponymous Danzig, and generally melted faces with the force of his voice. And thanks to Fred and Carrie, he’s now stopping by tonight’s brand new Portlandia so we can finally get to see what “Evil Elvis” is like when he hits the beach. To celebrate his appearance, we put together our favorite metal moments from pop culture, from the sublime to the absurd.

10. Cannibal Corpse meets Ace Ventura

Back in the ’90s,  Cannibal Corpse was just a small time band from Upstate New York, plying their death metal wares wherever they could find a crowd, when a call from Jim Carry transformed their lives. Turns out the actor was a fan, and wanted them for a cameo in his new movie, Ace Ventura: Pet Detective. The band had a European tour coming up, and were wary of being made fun of, so they turned it down. Thankfully, the rubber-faced In Living Color vet wouldn’t take no for an answer, proving that you don’t need to have a lot of fans, just the right ones.


9. AC/DC in Private Parts

Howard Stern’s autobiographical film, based on his book of the same name, followed his rise in the world of radio and pop culture. For a man surrounded by naked ladies and adoring fans, it’s hard to track the exact moment he made it. But rocking out with AC/DC in the middle of Central Park, as throngs of fans clamor to get a piece of you, seems like it comes pretty close. You can actually see Stern go from hit host to radio god in this clip, as “You Shook Me All Night Long” blasts in the background.


8. Judas Priest meets The Simpsons

When you want to blast a bunch of peace-loving hippies out on their asses, you’re going to need some death metal. At least, that’s what the folks at The Simpsons thought when they set up this cameo from the metal gods. Unfortunately, thanks to a hearty online backlash, the writers of the classic series were soon informed that Judas Priest, while many things, are not in fact “death metal.” This led to the most Simpson-esque apology ever. Rock on, Bartman. Rock on.


7. Anthrax on Married…With Children

What do you get when Married…with Children spoofs My Dinner With Andre, substituting the erudite playwrights for a band so metal they piss rust? Well, for starters, a lot of headbanging, property destruction and blown eardrums. And much like everything else in life, Al seems to have missed the fun.


6. Motorhead rocks out on The Young Ones

The Young Ones didn’t just premiere on BBC2 in 1982 — it kicked the doors down to a new way of doing comedy. A full-on assault on the staid state of sitcoms, the show brought a punk rock vibe to the tired format, and in the process helped jumpstart a comedy revolution. For instance, where an old sitcom would just cut from one scene to the next, The Young Ones choose to have Lemmy and his crew deliver a raw version of “Ace of Spades.” The general attitude seemed to be, you don’t like this? Well, then F— you!


5. Red and Kitty Meet Kiss on That ’70s Show

Carsey-Werner Productions

Carsey-Werner Productions

Long before they were banished to playing arena football games, Kiss was the hottest ticket in rock. The gang from That ’70s Show got to live out every ’70s teen’s dream when they were set loose backstage at a Kiss concert, taking full advantage of groupies, ganja and hard rock.


4. Ronnie James Dio in Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny (NSFW, people!)

What does a young boy do when he was born to rock, and the world won’t let him? What tight compadre does he pray to for guidance and some sweet licks? If you’re a young Jables, half of “the world’s most awesome band,” you bow your head to Ronnie James Dio, aka the guy who freaking taught the world how to do the “Metal Horns.” Never before has a rock god been so literal than in this clip that turns it up to eleven.


3. Ozzy Osbourne in Trick or Treat

It’s hard to tell if Ozzy was trying his hardest here, or just didn’t give a flying f–k. What is clear is that, either way, it doesn’t really matter. Ozzy’s approach to acting seems to lean more heavily on Jack Daniels than sense memory, and yet seeing the slurry English rocker play a sex-obsessed televangelist is so ridiculous, he gets a free pass. Taking part in the cult horror Trick or Treat, Ozzy proves that he makes things better just by showing up. Because that’s exactly what he did here. Showed up. And it rocks.


2. Glenn Danzig on Portlandia

Danzig seems to be coming out of a self imposed exile these days. He just signed with a record company, and his appearance on Portlandia is reminding everyone how kick ass he truly is. Who else but “The Other Man in Black” could help Portland’s resident goths figure out what to wear to the beach? Carrie Brownstein called Danzig “amazing,” and he called Fred “a genius,” so this was a rare love fest for the progenitor of horror punk.


1. Alice Cooper in Wayne’s World

It’s surprising, sure, but for a scene that contains no music whatsoever, it’s probably the most famous metal moment in the history of film. When Alice Cooper informed Wayne and Garth that Milwaukee is actually pronounced “Milly-way-kay” back in 1992, he created one of the most famous scenes in comedy history. What’s more metal than that? Much like Wayne and Garth, we truly are not worthy.

Ralph Fiennes on acting (and directing) Shakespeare in “Coriolanus”

Ralph Fiennes on acting (and directing) Shakespeare in “Coriolanus” (photo)

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Actor Ralph Fiennes has played some powerful men: lords, dukes, the Greek god of the underworld, even the most evil wizard ever. But in his new movie, an adaptation of William Shakespeare’s “Coriolanus,” Fiennes plays his most powerful role to date: film director. When I asked Fiennes how he liked sitting in the director’s chair for the first time, he described it as something of a mixed bag. “It was scary and sometimes a headfuck. I knew it would be.” he said. “But I also knew it was possible. You just need to have the time and the support system. But unquestionably it was a challenge, especially in bigger scenes. Those were very tough days.”

The tough days produced a tough, intense film, one that doesn’t look like your typical Shakespearean adaptation — unless my memory’s spotty and I’m just forgetting the other Shakespeare movies with brutal and surprisingly badass modern warfare scenes to rival anything in “The Hurt Locker” or “Green Zone.” Fiennes and screenwriter John Logan preserved much of Shakespeare’s original dialogue while updating the setting, teasing out fascinating twenty-first century relevance in a text hundreds of years old.

Fiennes stars as the title character, a fearsome Roman general who gets exiled from his home and winds up forming an unlikely alliance with his former enemy, the Volscian general Aufidius (Gerard Butler). The film opens with a riot, where the disgruntled lower classes revolt against the government and Coriolanus and his black-clad mlilitary men are called in to restore order. The whole sequence, which was shot months ago, resonates with weirdly clairvoyant shades of the Occupy Wall Street movement.

In our brief but stimulating conversation, Fiennes and I discussed the movie’s timely political commentary and his approach to the muscular action scenes, and we even spent a quick minute or two on “Skyfall,” the upcoming James Bond film by director Sam Mendes in which the actor plays an as-yet-undisclosed role (“I don’t get laid, that’s for sure,” Fiennes teased). As I sat down for our chat, Fiennes was thumbing through a recent issue of Cineaste with a “Shakespeare in the Movies” supplement, so I decided to start my questions right there.

Do you have a favorite film of a Shakespeare play?



I haven’t seen it in a long time, but the Russian director Grigori Kozintsev did an epic black and white “Hamlet” with a Russian actor called [Innokenti] Smoktunovsky that was amazing. I also love Peter Brook’s version of “King Lear” with Paul Scofield. It was fantastic; shot in Denmark, I think. There’s a brilliant opening with the camera tracking along all these static faces and the camera just tracks and tracks and tracks. Then it cuts to the back of this huge vertical shape, like a tree trunk or a sculpture. You see all these men facing it in a stone room but you don’t know what it is. Then you cut around to the front, and it’s actually a tall throne with Scofield sitting with this huge fur against his head. He just stares and stares and there’s this long pause. Then suddenly he says “No, it is our fast intent, to shake all cares and purpose from our age, conferring them on younger strengths…”

I’m sensing you’ve seen that a couple times.

[laughs] Yeah, it’s brilliant.

Well let’s talk about your Shakespearian adaptation. As I was sitting in the next room waiting to talk to you, I was looking at a pile of newspapers and every one had Occupy Wall Street on the front page, all with pictures that look like scenes from your film. It’s almost like you were looking into a crystal ball when you made this.


It’s weird. I just think “Coriolanus” is always quote-unquote relevant. The power play, the politics, etc. But now with everything going on, Egypt, the Middle East, what’s happening in Syria — I mean that’s a Coriolanian regime. Coriolanus is in the Syrian army somewhere.



But it is a tragedy; it’s the tragedy of Coriolanus. He’s not trying to be a dictator. He’s a soldier that doesn’t tolerate a democratic vision, but that’s because he’s a soldier. You can only understand him if you understand that he’s a part of that military ethos. I think military people can have a sense of that otherness from the civilian world, and in Coriolanus’ case, it’s extreme. But it is a man trying to hold to a sense of his warrior’s honor, which is completely out of place and doesn’t work, particularly in his reluctance to negotiate. And the tragedy is he agrees to negotiate when he shouldn’t and it’s counterproductive in every way. But I have a sympathy for him.

Why is that?

I suppose he has the tragic flaw of arrogance or pride, but he’s a man trying to hold to who he is. And that always moved me when I saw it. He’s this remote, flinty, confrontational person. In a way, you weep for him because he’s so alone. He’s incapable of embracing any kind of intimacy with anyone, except with his enemy Aufidius. And that’s the closest he gets to any kind of meaningful, intimate interaction.

You played the role on the stage about a decade ago. Has your interpretation of the character changed in that time?

Probably it hasn’t essentially changed, but the film gives you opportunity to show things that are not in the play that help the audience build a picture of who this person is. I can show the “remove-ness” of him, which I’m drawn to, in his exile, in his walking or camping out in the swamp. I loved doing those things.

I’m guessing there’s probably a little more action in this film than there was in the stage version you did.

Yeah, but in Shakespeare’s play, within the first 20 minutes, there’s a war. We pretty much followed Shakespeare’s structure, but we actually simplified the battle from the play to the film. In the play, Coriolanus captures the town, then goes out from the town into the plain to help Cominius win another battle and then he fights Aufidius. I mean, it’s relentless, and that’s all just the beginning of the play.

I think Shakespeare’s trying to say “You think you don’t like him, but look at what he is. He has got the most extreme, physical warrior’s courage you’ll ever see. Now try to figure out what we’re going to do with him.” I think there’s a mischievous side of Shakespeare showing us different sides of things, presenting us with a problem of behavior. How do we respond to that?

The battle scenes look incredible. I’m sitting there going, “Wow, this is like ‘The Hurt Locker.'” Then I looked at the credits and I realize your director of cinematography was Barry Ackroyd, who was the cinematographer of “The Hurt Locker.” And you were in that film as well.

That’s true, but people latch on to Barry’s great skill for that kind of cinematography and ignore the quieter things he does brilliantly as well. Barry works a lot for Ken Loach. The simpler scenes are beautifully shot. People don’t notice him there. I wanted that kind of cameraman.

The other very visual part of the movie that I responded to were the close-ups. They felt unusually close, at least to my eye, and very intimate in a way that also makes a movie different than a play, because you could never get that close to an actor on the stage. In that sense, they’re actually very cinematic close-ups.

Some people say to use your close-ups sparingly. Don’t overdo them. But a lot of them were just instinctive gut choices on the day. I had the camera and could have shown a lot more, but the drama is happening inside people’s eyes when they’re speaking. When Brian Cox says “I know what you are, I’ve got your number,” and he leans in, you want to be in close. I was constantly making that choice. There are wider shots but, for key moments anyway, we stay close. The face is a landscape on film.

I’ve seen great actors do not-so-great versions of Shakespeare. Is there a separate set of skills an actor needs to do this kind of work?

Shakespeare’s use of English is increasingly alien. You start a sentence and you have all these clauses before you get to where the sentence is to arrive at. In some pieces that’s truly challenging. Other times, he writes very simply. Sometimes I think people come to Shakespeare with an inhibition or fear. I think that’s more the problem than they don’t have the skills to do it.

They just get intimidated?

It’s often simpler than people think.

They build it up as this grand thing in their mind.

They build it up that it needs some kind of weird inflection. It doesn’t. There are certainly heightened moments when there is a musical quality. I’ve just done Prospero in “The Tempest,” and there are a couple places, certainly one famous speech where he lets go of his spells, where there is that sort of structure, a build that has to happen. And if you flatline that in a kind of nonchalant way, it disappears. So there are certain so-called “arias,” that are there. Those are often the great passages. But it has to come from a real place. One of my notes to myself and to everyone on “Coriolanus” was “Keep it simple.” Don’t over-inflect. The speech needed to be naturalistic and simple and accessible as much as possible.

“Coriolanus” opens tomorrow in limited release. If you see it let us know what you think. Leave us a comment below or write to us on Facebook and Twitter.

National Board of Review names “Hugo” best film of 2011

National Board of Review names “Hugo” best film of 2011 (photo)

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Basically when it comes to this year’s awards season, if you ain’t about old movies, you ain’t nothing. Earlier in the week, The New York Film Critics Circle named the silent film homage “The Artist” their Best Film of 2011. Today, the National Board of Review chose the silent film homage “Hugo” as their Best Film of 2011. And they say film is dead! Pshaw! Poppycock! And other equally outdated exclamations!

But enough about thinkpiece fodder. Let’s get to the important stuff: the winners. The NBR went for “Hugo” and named Martin Scorsese Best Director. They gave three prizes to Alexander Payne‘s “The Descendants:” Best Actor (George Clooney), Best Supporting Actress (Shailene Woodley) and Best Adapted Screenplay (Payne, Nat Faxon, and Jim Rash). Christopher Plummer won Best Supporting Actor for “Beginners,” in a category that is looking more and more like a two man race between him and “Drive”‘s Albert Brooks (I say let ‘em arm wrestle for the prize). Tilda Swinton won Best Actress for “We Need to Talk About Kevin” and Best Foreign Film went to NYFCC winner “A Separation.” The NBR also gave the very busy Michael Fassbender a Spotlight Award, honoring his work in four of the twenty-eight movies (approximate) he appeared in this year. The full list of winners is below.

Part of the National Board of Review’s annual awards are their lists of top movies, which are always handy reference guides to the “important” films of the year (note I did not say the best movies of the year). This year the NBR listed ten top films, five documentaries, five foreign films, and ten indies. I still need to see fourteen of their thirty picks. So if you’ll excuse me, I’ve got some work to go do.

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