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Street artist Anthony Lister talks about his awesome “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” mural

Street artist Anthony Lister talks about his awesome “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” mural (photo)

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“Rise of the Planet of the Apes” was a stand-out film of 2011, and judging from artist Anthony Lister’s impactful Los Angeles-based mural dedicated to the movie, he shares the same sentiment. Granted it was done in coordination with 20th Century Fox, but still; the resulting painting demonstrates a strong affinity for the pic.

Lister completed the piece — located along famed Melrose Ave. — over three nights, and according to him, it was the shapes of the apes in particular that led to his inspiration.

“I have been a fan of ‘Planet of the Apes’ films since I was a little kid, and ‘Rise of the Planet of the Apes’ was one of my favorite movies of the year,” Lister wrote to IFC. “I’m an adventure painter so I need to bring out the shapes that are already calling me. There are many adventure painters here in LA right now, like these apes, struggling to live the way they want to live. So I found myself scratching on the wall in the dark and the concept came to me; speaking for the apes and the apes rising. “

Check out the sizzle reel of Lister’s creation below, and then click here to see the complete time-lapse footage filmed over three days. “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” arrived on DVD and Blu-ray yesterday.

What do you think of Anthony Lister’s “Rise of the Planet of the Apes”-inspired mural? Let us know below or on Facebook or Twitter.

Danzig-Portlandia-604-web

Face Melting Cameos

The 10 Most Metal Pop Culture Cameos

Glenn Danzig drops by Portlandia tonight at 10P on IFC.

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Glenn Danzig rocks harder than granite. In his 60 years, he’s mastered punk with The Misfits, slayed metal with the eponymous Danzig, and generally melted faces with the force of his voice. And thanks to Fred and Carrie, he’s now stopping by tonight’s brand new Portlandia so we can finally get to see what “Evil Elvis” is like when he hits the beach. To celebrate his appearance, we put together our favorite metal moments from pop culture, from the sublime to the absurd.

10. Cannibal Corpse meets Ace Ventura

Back in the ’90s,  Cannibal Corpse was just a small time band from Upstate New York, plying their death metal wares wherever they could find a crowd, when a call from Jim Carry transformed their lives. Turns out the actor was a fan, and wanted them for a cameo in his new movie, Ace Ventura: Pet Detective. The band had a European tour coming up, and were wary of being made fun of, so they turned it down. Thankfully, the rubber-faced In Living Color vet wouldn’t take no for an answer, proving that you don’t need to have a lot of fans, just the right ones.


9. AC/DC in Private Parts

Howard Stern’s autobiographical film, based on his book of the same name, followed his rise in the world of radio and pop culture. For a man surrounded by naked ladies and adoring fans, it’s hard to track the exact moment he made it. But rocking out with AC/DC in the middle of Central Park, as throngs of fans clamor to get a piece of you, seems like it comes pretty close. You can actually see Stern go from hit host to radio god in this clip, as “You Shook Me All Night Long” blasts in the background.


8. Judas Priest meets The Simpsons

When you want to blast a bunch of peace-loving hippies out on their asses, you’re going to need some death metal. At least, that’s what the folks at The Simpsons thought when they set up this cameo from the metal gods. Unfortunately, thanks to a hearty online backlash, the writers of the classic series were soon informed that Judas Priest, while many things, are not in fact “death metal.” This led to the most Simpson-esque apology ever. Rock on, Bartman. Rock on.


7. Anthrax on Married…With Children

What do you get when Married…with Children spoofs My Dinner With Andre, substituting the erudite playwrights for a band so metal they piss rust? Well, for starters, a lot of headbanging, property destruction and blown eardrums. And much like everything else in life, Al seems to have missed the fun.


6. Motorhead rocks out on The Young Ones

The Young Ones didn’t just premiere on BBC2 in 1982 — it kicked the doors down to a new way of doing comedy. A full-on assault on the staid state of sitcoms, the show brought a punk rock vibe to the tired format, and in the process helped jumpstart a comedy revolution. For instance, where an old sitcom would just cut from one scene to the next, The Young Ones choose to have Lemmy and his crew deliver a raw version of “Ace of Spades.” The general attitude seemed to be, you don’t like this? Well, then F— you!


5. Red and Kitty Meet Kiss on That ’70s Show

Carsey-Werner Productions

Carsey-Werner Productions

Long before they were banished to playing arena football games, Kiss was the hottest ticket in rock. The gang from That ’70s Show got to live out every ’70s teen’s dream when they were set loose backstage at a Kiss concert, taking full advantage of groupies, ganja and hard rock.


4. Ronnie James Dio in Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny (NSFW, people!)

What does a young boy do when he was born to rock, and the world won’t let him? What tight compadre does he pray to for guidance and some sweet licks? If you’re a young Jables, half of “the world’s most awesome band,” you bow your head to Ronnie James Dio, aka the guy who freaking taught the world how to do the “Metal Horns.” Never before has a rock god been so literal than in this clip that turns it up to eleven.


3. Ozzy Osbourne in Trick or Treat

It’s hard to tell if Ozzy was trying his hardest here, or just didn’t give a flying f–k. What is clear is that, either way, it doesn’t really matter. Ozzy’s approach to acting seems to lean more heavily on Jack Daniels than sense memory, and yet seeing the slurry English rocker play a sex-obsessed televangelist is so ridiculous, he gets a free pass. Taking part in the cult horror Trick or Treat, Ozzy proves that he makes things better just by showing up. Because that’s exactly what he did here. Showed up. And it rocks.


2. Glenn Danzig on Portlandia

Danzig seems to be coming out of a self imposed exile these days. He just signed with a record company, and his appearance on Portlandia is reminding everyone how kick ass he truly is. Who else but “The Other Man in Black” could help Portland’s resident goths figure out what to wear to the beach? Carrie Brownstein called Danzig “amazing,” and he called Fred “a genius,” so this was a rare love fest for the progenitor of horror punk.


1. Alice Cooper in Wayne’s World

It’s surprising, sure, but for a scene that contains no music whatsoever, it’s probably the most famous metal moment in the history of film. When Alice Cooper informed Wayne and Garth that Milwaukee is actually pronounced “Milly-way-kay” back in 1992, he created one of the most famous scenes in comedy history. What’s more metal than that? Much like Wayne and Garth, we truly are not worthy.

Is this the age of fanfiction films?

Is this the age of fanfiction films? (photo)

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Last week, film critic Drew McWeeny wrote a really interesting piece at HitFix called “Muppets, Avengers, and Life In The Age Of Fanfiction.” It was inspired by a conversation with his colleague, TV critic Alan Sepinwall, who described the new “Muppets” movie as “the greatest work of fanfiction [he’d] ever seen.” That spurred McWeeny to write his piece on what he calls “the Age of Fanfiction.”

“What’s been truly bizarre, though, is the way the mainstream has slowly headed in the same direction, and without anyone noticing it, we seem to have handed over our entire industry to the creation of fanfiction on a corporate level, and at this point, I’m not sure how we’re expecting the pendulum to ever swing back. I know people love to blame Spielberg and Lucas for creating the modern blockbuster age, but at least when they decided to pay tribute to their inspirations, they did so in interesting ways. Spielberg has talked about how his frustrations at hearing that only English filmmakers could direct James Bond movies led to the creation of Indiana Jones, and Lucas was working out his love of Flash Gordon when he created ‘Star Wars.’ Those are healthy ways to work through your love of something, and absolutely make sense as important pieces in the creative process. What’s scary is how these days, filmmakers wouldn’t bother with that last step, the part where you take your inspirations and run them through your own filter. Now, instead, we live in an age where we are simply doing the source material again and again and again, and where original creation seems to be almost frowned upon as a ‘risk.'”

The other examples McWeeny cites besides “The Muppets” are J.J. Abrams‘ “Star Trek,” “The Twilight Saga,” and the upcoming movies based on “The Avengers” and the old horror soap “Dark Shadows.” And there are a lot more examples he could have cited from just this year alone. Early in 2011 we got “The Green Hornet” which extrapolated the metatextual rivalry between the Green Hornet and Kato on the old TV series (where the Hornet was the star and the sidekick, played by a young Bruce Lee, got all the press) into the main character dynamic of the film. Later, there was “Fast Five” with an all-star cast reunion that could have been based on a “Fast & Furious” die-hard’s fanfic about characters from every single previous entry joining forces to pull off one amazing heist. Two of the best blockbusters of the summer were prequels with classic what-were-they-like-before-we-met-them fanfic premises: “X-Men: First Class” and “Rise of the Planet of the Apes.”

McWeeny writes about how modern filmmakers don’t bother reimagining their childhood cultural addictions as new properties, and instead simply remake the the old properties over and over again. That’s not entirely true, though. J.J. Abrams followed his “Star Trek” fanfiction film with “Super 8,” where he took his love of early Steven Spielberg movies like “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” and “E.T.” and reworked their themes and imagery into a pastiche. In true fanfilm wonk fashion, he even got Spielberg, his idol, to executive produce the film.

This isn’t just about blockbusters, either. The Age of Fanfiction’s begun to seep into lots of other genres that have nothing to do with rebooting old television shows or films. The core idea of fanfiction — of the author assuming creative control over their obsession — is a crucial theme of several of this year’s most critically acclaimed movies. Three frontrunners for the Academy Award for Best Picture — “The Artist,” “Midnight in Paris” and “Hugo” — are clear expressions of the Age of Fanfiction. In the latter two cases, you even have directorial surrogates onscreen (Owen Wilson for Woody Allen in “Midnight in Paris,” Michael Stuhlbarg for Martin Scorsese in “Hugo”), who give the filmmakers the opportunity to indulge in the fantasy of interacting with that thing or person they love so dearly. The Artist” doesn’t include an obvious stand-in for director Michel Hazanavicius (whose two previous movies about the old spy series “OSS 117″ probably qualify as fanfiction films as well), but he does essentially rewrite history from a fan’s perspective, giving — SPOILER! — a corrective happy ending to a silent film actor cruelly discarded in the transition to sound.

McWeeny thinks the Age of Fanfiction could give way to the Age of Invention, but for that to happen the Age of Fanfiction would have to falter at the box office. Then again, it makes you wonder: if this generation’s movies are all reworkings of the previous generation’s movies, what are the next generation’s movies going to look like? Fanfiction about fanfiction? Nostalgia for nostalgia? Eventually, someone’s going to need to create something new. Maybe that’s when the Age of Invention will really begin.

What other recent movies qualify as “fanfiction films?” Tell us in the comments below or write to us on Facebook and Twitter.

Eddie Murphy Beverly Hills Cop

When Eddie Was Raw

5 Classic R-Rated Eddie Murphy Moments

Catch Beverly Hills Cop this month on IFC.

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Photo Credit: © Paramount Pictures / Courtesy: Everett Collection

Before becoming the voice of Donkey in the Shrek movies and every family member of The Klumps, Eddie Murphy exuded raw comedic genius on the big screen. His rock star magnetism was so big in the ‘8os, he was up there with Prince, Michael Jackson and E.T. Before you catch Eddie in Beverly Hills Cop this month on IFC, take a look at some hilarious moments from his wilder, raunchier days. Put the kids to bed, because this is NSFW Eddie we’re talking about.

5. Billy Ray shows off his kung-fu moves, Trading Places

In this scene, Eddie Murphy as Billy Ray Valentine shows off his impressive karate skills to some tough guys, one of whom is Giancarlo Esposito, aka Gus Fring from Breaking Bad. It is doubtful that Mr. Miyagi would be able to talk his way out of getting a prison shiv in the gut the way Eddie does here. Luckily for Billy Ray, his hilarious antics let him avoid a confrontation with a Barry White look-alike before a guard arrives.


4. Akeem says good morning to the neighbors, Coming to America

Prince Akeem bids good morning to his neighbors the Big Apple way in this memorable scene. We think he’ll fit in just fine.


3. Impersonating a Rocky fan, Eddie Murphy: Raw

In this R-Rated story, Eddie captured the essence of a testosterone-filled ’80s Rocky fan stupid enough to pick a fight and demand some Jujubees from a much taller man. Eddie Murphy is probably the only comedian who could’ve pulled off wearing a blue and black leather jumpsuit on stage.


2. Posing as a building inspector, Beverly Hills Cop

Beverly Hills Cop is filled with hilarious moments that showcase Eddie’s improv skills. This scene finds Axel Foley reading the riot act to some builders and delivering the classic line, “What are you, a f–ing art critic?”


1. Messing with rednecks, 48. Hrs.

From the moment Eddie Murphy takes the badge from Nolte and enters the redneck bar until he puts the cowboy hat on his head at the end of the scene, he was perfect. This is the moment Eddie went from being the funniest cast member on SNL to a full-fledged movie star. While pointing out how much he enjoys messing with rednecks, most of whom are clearly too stupid to have jobs, he matches Nick Nolte’s intensity throughout. The scene announced that there was a new Comedy Sheriff in town, and his name was Eddie Murphy.

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