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IFC.com’s 2011 Holiday Gift Guide

IFC.com’s 2011 Holiday Gift Guide (photo)

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Whether you’re a fan of superhero action, absurd humor, or heart-wrenching drama, it’s a great time to be reading comics – but it can be a little intimidating to shop for the comics fan on your list if you’re not exactly a regular reader. And with that in mind, we’ve put together a list of some of books you might want to add to your holiday shopping list.

The list below features some great mainstream books, indie darlings, a television tie-in or two, and even some collections of popular webcomics that are finding a new audience in print. In fact, all you need to do is match the book with the person you’re buying it for, and your shopping is done – aside from the gift-wrapping, that is. Consider it our holiday gift to you.


Batman: Knightfall Vol. 1-3

batman.jpgFor the mainstream superhero fan on your list, next year will be a big year for Batman. Christopher Nolan’s “The Dark Knight Rises” hits theaters in July, and the film will introduce one of Batman’s greatest enemies, Bane – who famously “broke the Bat” in the now-classic Batman: Knightfall storyline.

Anyone looking for a refresher course on why Bane is one of the Dark Knight’s most dangerous foes need only pick up the collected editions of the Knightfall arc (“Broken Bat,” “Who Rules The Night,” and “KnightsEnd“) to get all the back story on the brilliant behemoth Tom Hardy will play in the film. This is must-read material for any Batman fans out there.


Ultimate Comics Avengers, Vol. 1: The Next Generation

avengers.jpgWith Marvel’s massive team-up movie looming on the horizon, now’s as good as time as any to get caught up with Earth’s Mightiest Heroes. Marvel recently relaunched many of its most popular characters in the Ultimate Comics line, offering up a more modern, gritty take on the heroes that’s frequently cited as one of the chief inspirations for its recent (and upcoming) movies.

The first volume of Ultimate Comics Avengers features a story scripted by Wanted creator Mark Millar, and introduces readers to the team dynamic by throwing the cast of characters into yet another world-threatening catastrophe – or in this case, multiple catastrophes. While it’s certainly not recommended for children, Ultimate Comics Avengers goes a long way toward reminding older fans why the Avengers are not a team to mess with.


DC Comics: The New 52

dcnew52.jpgDC Comics made headlines a few months ago when it rebooted its entire universe and launched 52 new series in the span of a month. The first issues of all of those series are collected in this impressive hardcover volume, and it’s no exaggeration to say that there’s something for everyone in this book.

From Superman and Wonder Woman to Swamp Thing and Aquaman, this collection has all of DC’s new line of characters, and provides the best jumping-on point you can ask for when it comes to the DC universe. Oh, and on a side note, I highly recommend Jeff Lemire’s Animal Man – it’s one of my favorite of the bunch.


The Walking Dead: Compendium One

walkingdead.jpgSure, everyone loves the AMC television series, but Robert Kirkman’s post-apocalyptic zombie saga has been rolling along for years now and steadily building a shambling legion of fans. This massive tome collects the first 48 issues of the series, and includes some of the most memorable moments from the first few years of the comic. Despite its size, it’s also a bit more manageable than than the beautiful-but-heavy hardcover “Omnibus” editions, so it’s an easier (and cheaper) way to get caught up with the hit series.

It’s also worth noting that the comic book series and television series differ quite a bit in some areas, so if you know someone who’s a big fan of “The Walking Dead” tv series, they’ll find plenty of surprises in this collection.


Doctor Who: The Dave Gibbons Collection

doctorwho.jpgAlso spinning out of a fan-favorite television phenomenon is IDW Publishing’s Doctor Who: The Dave Gibbons Collection, a hardcover collection of Watchmen artist Dave Gibbons’ celebrated run on the series. The popular artist had a lengthy, memorable run on the series, which took the BBC’s science-fiction hero from the television to the printed page for some wild adventures.

This particular collection follows the fourth iteration of The Doctor (played by Tom Baker in the television series), and brings together all of Gibbons’ work for the very first time. If there’s a “Doctor Who” fan on your list – and there seems to be a lot of them these days – this collection could send him or her into a fandom-induced frenzy, so consider yourself warned.


Locke & Key, Vol. 1-4

locke.jpgAlso from IDW Publishing – and also with a television connection – is Locke & Key, the award-winning series written by Joe Hill, the son of novelist Stephen King. Hill clearly inherited his father’s talent for telling a scary story, as Locke & Key manages to be both terrifying and compelling, and keeps readers guessing from one page to the next. The series tells the story of a family that inherits a mysterious mansion in which magical keys unlock all sorts of wonderful – and occasionally nightmarish – secrets.

The series was optioned a while back amid much fanfare, but the pilot episode of the series was never picked up. Nevertheless, the episode received heavy praise from fans when it was screened during this year’s Comic-Con in San Diego. The four volumes of the series (“Welcome to Lovecraft,” “Head Games,” “Crown of Shadows,” and “Keys to the Kingdom“) will show you what the fuss is all about and – I’m betting – make you a fan, too.


Wednesday Comics

wednesdaycomics.jpgThis oversized, hardcover collection of DC’s critically praised Wednesday Comics series features 16 different stories by some of the best-known writers and artists in the comics industry. Originally published as weekly newspaper-style strips, the series assembled an impressive cast of characters from all across the DC universe, including Batman, Adam Strange, Metamorpho, Wonder Woman, and Sgt. Rock.

Even more impressive than the characters featured in the series are the creative teams the publisher assembled for the project – an eclectic list that includes everyone from Neil Gaiman and Paul Pope to Walter Simonson and Joe Kubert. While the book isn’t likely to fit on your comic fan’s shelf (it’s slightly smaller than an unfolded, standard newspaper), it will definitely occupy a place of honor in his or her collection.


Morning Glories, Vol. 1 Deluxe Collection

morningglories.jpgOne of our favorite new series, Morning Glories is what would happen if you set the “Lost” television series inside a mysterious prep school. Filled with shocking cliffhangers, multiple layers of brain-tingling mysteries, and characters faced with more questions than answers, the series is a no-brainer for gift guides and “Best Of” lists – mainly because it feels like a great television series in comic book form.

This hardcover edition of Morning Glories collects the first 12 issues of the series, and is filled with lots of extras and exclusive content that fans will certainly appreciate. If you end up thumbing through the series while you’re waiting in line, don’t be surprised if you end up buying one for yourself to accompany the one you’re giving away.


Twenty-Seven, Vol. 1: First Set

27.jpgYou know all of those stories about why so many musicians and other artists died at age 27? Well, this series from Image Comics tackles that very subject, and crafts a fascinating mythology out of the “27 Club” that you’ll need to read to believe.

From Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin to Kurt Cobain and – most recently – Amy Winehouse, the “27 Club” has sparked no small amount of speculation and urban myths. This book is an easy pick for the music-loving comic fan on your gift list, and collects the first four issues of the series in one place.


Infinite Kung-Fu

kungfu.jpgIf you know someone who’s a fan of old-school martial arts films – or the modern-day homages to them – Kagan McLeod’s Infinite Kung-Fu needs to be on your shopping list. The critically praised graphic novel follows a former soldier who must master the greatest kung-fu techniques in existence in order to save the world from the evil emperor’s diabolical plans. Not only is it a great story, but it’s the sort of epic tale that will have readers cheering along each stage of its hero’s quest.

This 464-page book collects the entire story in one bookshelf-worthy novel, and you’ll realize in no time why it’s regarded as one of the year’s best books.


The Homeland Directive

homeland.jpgIf the comics fan on your list is the sort who appreciates a tense drama peppered with high-octane action (a la the “24” television series), this story by the writer of The Surrogates will scratch that itch quite nicely. Robert Venditti’s The Homeland Directive follows an expert researcher at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention who’s caught up in a massive conspiracy that threatens the lives of millions of Americans.

At times feeling like an edge-of-your-seat thriller straight off a movie screen, The Homeland Directive should appeal to anyone who wants a little more than capes-and-tights superhero fare, and appreciates a fast-paced story with real-world danger and implications.


Fables: The Deluxe Edition, Books 1-3

fables.jpgIt seems like faery tales are all the rage these days on television, but comic book readers have been privy to years of edgy spins on Snow White, Pinocchio, and the rest of the faery-tale world in Bill Willingham’s Fables. The award-winning series chronicles the adventures of popular characters from folklore who were forced to hide out in modern-day Manhattan after being driven from their homelands by a mysterious adversary.

The series reached its 100th issue earlier this year, but these hardcover collections each take you through 10-12 issues of the series and offer lots of great extras that other editions are missing. If you like what you read, you can decide to catch up with the more frequently published paperback collections or even the single issues – but these editions are a great way to begin this thrilling series that somehow manages to get better with every story arc.


Scenes From A Multiverse: Book One

multiverse.jpgJonathan Rosenberg had everyone guessing what was next when he ended his long-running, wildly popular webcomic Goats, but his follow-up series Scenes From A Multiverse has more than lived up to expectations. Chronicling the weird science and alien cultures of a variety of fictional planets, Scenes From A Multiverse manages to be both hilarious and thought-provoking – and the perfect gift for the comics fan on your list who doesn’t mind a few jokes about advanced physics and the trouble with time-travel drugs.

Scenes From A Multiverse: Book One is the first (obviously) collection of Rosenberg’s popular new series, and features an introduction by Skepchick.org lead writer Rebecca Watson.


Octopus Pie: There Are No Stars In Brooklyn

brooklyn.jpgMore than just a love letter to the urban experience, Meredith Gran’s Octopus Pie is a wonderful story about two women trying to figure out how to make the best of life in that uncertain time after school ends and the rest of your “grown-up” life begins. The first two years of Gran’s poignant, funny, and occasionally very personal webcomic were collected in this treasury published by Villard Books, which also includes a bonus story available only in the collection.

As with all webcomics, if your intended recipient enjoys the book, he or she will find plenty more comics to read on the Octopus Pie website – so there’s a good chance you’ll be giving a gift that keeps on giving.


The Abominable Charles Christopher: Book One

snowman.jpgKarl Kerschl’s beautifully detailed webcomic about an adorably naïve sasquatch and a forest full of talking animals was named the best digital comic of 2011 at this year’s Eisners – the comic industry’s most prestigious award ceremony. A respected artist already known for his work on various superhero comics like Teen Titans: Year One and the aforementioned Wednesday Comics #1 (as well as a well-received comic based on the Assassin’s Creed video game series), Kerschl has made a nice home for himself in the online world among the wise-cracking creatures of Charles Christopher.

Kerschl self-published this first print collection of the series in a nice paperback edition that deserves equal space on any comic fan’s bookshelf. Simply put, if you don’t find yourself grinning while reading Charles Christopher, you might not have a soul.

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Face Melting Cameos

The 10 Most Metal Pop Culture Cameos

Glenn Danzig drops by Portlandia tonight at 10P on IFC.

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Glenn Danzig rocks harder than granite. In his 60 years, he’s mastered punk with The Misfits, slayed metal with the eponymous Danzig, and generally melted faces with the force of his voice. And thanks to Fred and Carrie, he’s now stopping by tonight’s brand new Portlandia so we can finally get to see what “Evil Elvis” is like when he hits the beach. To celebrate his appearance, we put together our favorite metal moments from pop culture, from the sublime to the absurd.

10. Cannibal Corpse meets Ace Ventura

Back in the ’90s,  Cannibal Corpse was just a small time band from Upstate New York, plying their death metal wares wherever they could find a crowd, when a call from Jim Carry transformed their lives. Turns out the actor was a fan, and wanted them for a cameo in his new movie, Ace Ventura: Pet Detective. The band had a European tour coming up, and were wary of being made fun of, so they turned it down. Thankfully, the rubber-faced In Living Color vet wouldn’t take no for an answer, proving that you don’t need to have a lot of fans, just the right ones.


9. AC/DC in Private Parts

Howard Stern’s autobiographical film, based on his book of the same name, followed his rise in the world of radio and pop culture. For a man surrounded by naked ladies and adoring fans, it’s hard to track the exact moment he made it. But rocking out with AC/DC in the middle of Central Park, as throngs of fans clamor to get a piece of you, seems like it comes pretty close. You can actually see Stern go from hit host to radio god in this clip, as “You Shook Me All Night Long” blasts in the background.


8. Judas Priest meets The Simpsons

When you want to blast a bunch of peace-loving hippies out on their asses, you’re going to need some death metal. At least, that’s what the folks at The Simpsons thought when they set up this cameo from the metal gods. Unfortunately, thanks to a hearty online backlash, the writers of the classic series were soon informed that Judas Priest, while many things, are not in fact “death metal.” This led to the most Simpson-esque apology ever. Rock on, Bartman. Rock on.


7. Anthrax on Married…With Children

What do you get when Married…with Children spoofs My Dinner With Andre, substituting the erudite playwrights for a band so metal they piss rust? Well, for starters, a lot of headbanging, property destruction and blown eardrums. And much like everything else in life, Al seems to have missed the fun.


6. Motorhead rocks out on The Young Ones

The Young Ones didn’t just premiere on BBC2 in 1982 — it kicked the doors down to a new way of doing comedy. A full-on assault on the staid state of sitcoms, the show brought a punk rock vibe to the tired format, and in the process helped jumpstart a comedy revolution. For instance, where an old sitcom would just cut from one scene to the next, The Young Ones choose to have Lemmy and his crew deliver a raw version of “Ace of Spades.” The general attitude seemed to be, you don’t like this? Well, then F— you!


5. Red and Kitty Meet Kiss on That ’70s Show

Carsey-Werner Productions

Carsey-Werner Productions

Long before they were banished to playing arena football games, Kiss was the hottest ticket in rock. The gang from That ’70s Show got to live out every ’70s teen’s dream when they were set loose backstage at a Kiss concert, taking full advantage of groupies, ganja and hard rock.


4. Ronnie James Dio in Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny (NSFW, people!)

What does a young boy do when he was born to rock, and the world won’t let him? What tight compadre does he pray to for guidance and some sweet licks? If you’re a young Jables, half of “the world’s most awesome band,” you bow your head to Ronnie James Dio, aka the guy who freaking taught the world how to do the “Metal Horns.” Never before has a rock god been so literal than in this clip that turns it up to eleven.


3. Ozzy Osbourne in Trick or Treat

It’s hard to tell if Ozzy was trying his hardest here, or just didn’t give a flying f–k. What is clear is that, either way, it doesn’t really matter. Ozzy’s approach to acting seems to lean more heavily on Jack Daniels than sense memory, and yet seeing the slurry English rocker play a sex-obsessed televangelist is so ridiculous, he gets a free pass. Taking part in the cult horror Trick or Treat, Ozzy proves that he makes things better just by showing up. Because that’s exactly what he did here. Showed up. And it rocks.


2. Glenn Danzig on Portlandia

Danzig seems to be coming out of a self imposed exile these days. He just signed with a record company, and his appearance on Portlandia is reminding everyone how kick ass he truly is. Who else but “The Other Man in Black” could help Portland’s resident goths figure out what to wear to the beach? Carrie Brownstein called Danzig “amazing,” and he called Fred “a genius,” so this was a rare love fest for the progenitor of horror punk.


1. Alice Cooper in Wayne’s World

It’s surprising, sure, but for a scene that contains no music whatsoever, it’s probably the most famous metal moment in the history of film. When Alice Cooper informed Wayne and Garth that Milwaukee is actually pronounced “Milly-way-kay” back in 1992, he created one of the most famous scenes in comedy history. What’s more metal than that? Much like Wayne and Garth, we truly are not worthy.

Exclusive premiere: Spacecamp “Miko D.T.B.”

Exclusive premiere: Spacecamp “Miko D.T.B.”  (photo)

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Spacecamp’s very first music video is a heavy dose of impressive superimposition mixed with collage, claymation, stop motion, and oil painting. Director Philip Di Fiore gives the piece a timeless feeling combining a love for old Blue Note record covers with magnificent manipulations of light and perspective.

The song, which comes from the band’s debut EP, “Alibi,” is equally as enthralling. Lyrically, it tells the tale of a boat captain who is running guns and narcotics from Brazil back to the States via the Florida Keys.

Nothing off about that, but then our boat captain is betrayed by his lover. “His boat is boarded by a group of very good soccer players,” the band explains. “They carry golden revolvers and fight valiantly for their heroine (not the drug), Sister Crystalline, also the Captain’s fraudulent bed-mate.”

Who would guess that a gal named Sister Crystalline wouldn’t be on the up and up? An extremely smooth bass groove seems to level things out, but the plot is further complicated, “by the fact that she is the leader of an ancient-mystic-shamanistic-psychotropic religious society.” Spacecamp assures us that, “She probably means well, even though she behaved badly.”

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Like “Miko D.T.B.” the other songs on “Alibi,” will leave you feeling like you just spent some quality time with The Police, The Clash, and The Talking Heads. Check out a full stream of the band’s EP which released Nov. 22nd on Modern Records, here.

Want to see more Spacecamp? Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter or Facebook!

Watch “The Spielberg Face,” a director’s signature defined

Watch “The Spielberg Face,” a director’s signature defined (photo)

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Think you’re busy? Steven Spielberg has two movies opening in the same week. Stanley Kubrick used to take a decade to make a single film. Spielberg’s got two of ‘em — “The Adventures of Tintin” and “War Horse” — opening within four days of each other. That’s crazy.

All this Spielberginess means it’s a good time to to consider the man’s filmography. Kevin B. Lee from Fandor has done exactly that with an absolutely first-rate supercut and video essay entitled “The Spielberg Face.” Inspired by an article on UGO by Matt Patches, the video compiles and analyzes dozens of examples of what Lee describes as “maybe the most singular visual element to his films:” strikingly powerful dollying close-ups of human faces as they gaze, usually in wonderment, at something remarkable.

Kudos to Lee (and to Patches) for defining something fundamental about Spielberg’s movies that was sitting there quite literally staring us in the face all this time. If someone’s looking to pick up their scholarship and carry it further, I think there’s more work to be done here on the context of these faces and the impact of all this looking on these characters’ psyches. Lee identifies the “anti-Spielberg face” as a phenomenon of the director’s post-9/11 work, when the act of looking begin to takes on horrifying dimensions (like Dakota Fanning’s character in 2005’s “War of the Worlds”). But that’s far from the first Spielberg Face with negative consequences for its wearer. The most famous Spielberg Face in history might be Rene Belloq’s ecstatic expression as he gazes into the Ark of the Covenant in “Raiders.” He’s certainly performing the wordless stare of “child-like surrender” that Lee describes, and we all know how that works out for poor Belloq: not too good. In fact, everyone in the presence of the Ark dies except Indiana Jones and Marion. Why are they spared? Because they resist the urge to look. They don’t give in to the blissful temptation of the Spielberg Face.

I think there may have been a darker side to the Spielberg Face all along. Most of the examples that immediately jump to mind are moments of horror or sadness: Belloq goes kablooey, Roy Scheider witnesses Jaws in all his bloody glory for the very first time, the children spying the T. Rex in “Jurassic Park,” Elliott watching E.T. leave forever. Though Spielberg is often considered a sentimental filmmaker, his work has always been tinged with darkness. Maybe that subject can be the basis for the next Spielberg video essay. It’s at least worth a look.

What’s your favorite Steven Spielberg movie? Tell us in the comments below or write to us on Facebook and Twitter.

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