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The 10 most underrated comedies of all time

The 10 most underrated comedies of all time (photo)

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Comedy is the hardest thing to pull off, despite what the Academy Awards would have you believe. If you want proof of that, think of how painful it is to watch an attempt at comedy that isn’t actually funny. If a drama’s not that good, and can still get a cheeky enjoyability by how seriously everybody takes it. If a comedy sucks, there’s no saving it. Now, we all love “Anchorman” and “The Big Lebowski,” but here’s a quick list of undernoticed, underseen or underrated comedies that should not be dismissed just because they don’t have huge cult followings.


1. “The Jerk” (1979)

One might argue that Steve Martin’s classic can’t be underrated, since Judd Apatow made the enjoyment of “The Jerk” the barometer about whether or not a girl is worth dating in “Freaks and Geeks,” but it makes the list because it’s impossible to overrate this absurd gem, and it should be talked about a lot more than it seems to be. It’s Martin at the top of his wild and crazy game, before he transitioned into the erudite and droll intellectual aura he cultivates today, and as much as we love him now, the gloriously ridiculous wordplay, clever satire and innocently goofy charm of Navin Johnson’s naive stumbling into the real world is what made us love Steve Martin in the first place. Back when he was carnival personnel.


2. “Johnny Dangerously” (1984)

Often (although not often enough in the right places, apparently), one hears the sentiment that Michael Keaton should be in everything – or at least, why isn’t he in more stuff? He can do it all. He’s excellent at drama (both acting and directing), as evidenced by “The Merry Gentleman,” but he cut his teeth with comedies like this truly oddball gangster parody, also featuring Peter Boyle, Marilu Henner, and the best stuff you’ll ever see out of Joe Piscopo. It’s light, it’s breezy and a whole lot of fun, and Keaton is really damn charming even though he’s playing a fargin’ icehole. We defy you not to enjoy yourself while watching this movie. And for more evidence of great Keaton comedy, check out Ron Howard’s 1982 movie “Night Shift” – also underrated. He and Henry Winkler run a brothel out of a morgue. Come on. You gotta see that one, too.


3. “The Ten” (2006)

If Entertainment Weekly hadn’t done a big profile piece on “Wet Hot American Summer,” that would be the David Wain entry on this list. But they did, so instead, we shine a spotlight on “The Ten,” directed and co-written by Wain with Ken Marino. The all-star cast (including Paul Rudd, Famke Janssen, Liev Schreiber and Jessica Alba) really establishes the tone, pacing and insanity that eventually made “Children’s Hospital” a hit – featuring Gretchen Mol having a fling in Mexico with Jesus Christ, Winona Ryder’s delirious tryst with a ventriloquist’s dummy, and a song and dance number with a great deal of naked men.


4. “The Foot Fist Way” (2006)

For those of you who might be wondering where the hell Danny McBride came from, go watch this low-budget Jody Hill movie about cuckolded North Carolina taekwondo instructor Fred Simmons and you’ll be enlightened. Word has it that “Anchorman” greats Will Ferrell and Adam McKay loved this movie so much that they made a huge push to get it distributed – and said as much in the advertising for the film. Simmons battle of wills and skills with his celebrity martial-arts-movie idol Chuck “The Truck” Wallace (who turns out to be a drunken jerkface who sleeps with Fred’s wife) , as well as his unorthodox teaching methods and hard-line dojo philosophy are what make us all understand what McBride brings to the table and why he’ll always be welcome there.


5. “Burn After Reading” (2008)

The Dude gets most of the attention as far as Coen Brothers comedy goes, and “Raising Arizona” gets the rest, and they both deserve all the attention they get. However, there’s something sublimely wonderful about taking all the banal story elements of a by-the-numbers crime thriller movie and treating them seriously, but populating the cast of characters with the biggest stars in the world playing absolutely ridiculous morons. Frances McDormand’s surgery obsession, Brad Pitt’s energetic idiocy, John Malkovich’s profane rage and George Clooney’s sleazy skullduggery just make this a joy to watch.

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Soap tv show

As the Spoof Turns

15 Hilarious Soap Opera Parodies

Catch the classic sitcom Soap Saturday mornings on IFC.

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Photo Credit: Columbia Pictures Television

The soap opera is the indestructible core of television fandom. We celebrate modern series like The Wire and Breaking Bad with their ongoing storylines, but soap operas have been tangling more plot threads than a quilt for decades. Which is why pop culture enjoys parodying them so much.

Check out some of the funniest soap opera parodies below, and be sure to catch Soap Saturday mornings on IFC.

1. Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman

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Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman was a cult hit soap parody from the mind of Norman Lear that poked daily fun at the genre with epic twists and WTF moments. The first season culminated in a perfect satire of ratings stunts, with Mary being both confined to a psychiatric facility and chosen to be part of a Nielsen ratings family.


2. IKEA Heights

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IKEA Heights proves that the soap opera is alive and well, even if it has to be filmed undercover at a ready-to-assemble furniture store totally unaware of what’s happening. This unique webseries brought the classic formula to a new medium. Even IKEA saw the funny side — but has asked that future filmmakers apply through proper channels.


3. Fresno

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When you’re parodying ’80s nighttime soaps like Dallas and Dynasty , everything about your show has to equally sumptuous. The 1986 CBS miniseries Fresno delivered with a high-powered cast (Carol Burnett, Teri Garr and more in haute couture clothes!) locked in the struggle for the survival of a raisin cartel.


4. Soap

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Soap was the nighttime response to daytime soap operas: a primetime skewering of everything both silly and satisfying about the source material. Plots including demonic possession and alien abduction made it a cult favorite, and necessitated the first televised “viewer discretion” disclaimer. It also broke ground for featuring one of the first gay characters on television in the form of Billy Crystal’s Jodie Dallas. Revisit (or discover for the first time) this classic sitcom every Saturday morning on IFC.


5. Too Many Cooks

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Possibly the most perfect viral video ever made, Too Many Cooks distilled almost every style of television in a single intro sequence. The soap opera elements are maybe the most hilarious, with more characters and sudden shocking twists in an intro than most TV scribes manage in an entire season.


6. Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace

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Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace was more mockery than any one medium could handle. The endless complications of Darkplace Hospital are presented as an ongoing horror soap opera with behind-the-scenes anecdotes from writer, director, star, and self-described “dreamweaver visionary” Garth Marenghi and astoundingly incompetent actor/producer Dean Learner.


7. “Attitudes and Feelings, Both Desirable and Sometimes Secretive,” MadTV

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Soap opera connoisseurs know that the most melodramatic plots are found in Korea. MADtv‘s parody Tae Do  (translation: Attitudes and Feelings, Both Desirable and Sometimes Secretive) features the struggles of mild-mannered characters with far more feelings than their souls, or subtitles, could ever cope with.


8. Twin Peaks

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Twin Peaks, the twisted parody of small town soaps like Peyton Place whose own creator repeatedly insists is not a parody, has endured through pop culture since it changed television forever when it debuted in 1990. The show even had it’s own soap within in a soap called…


9. “Invitation to Love,” Twin Peaks

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Twin Peaks didn’t just parody soap operas — it parodied itself parodying soap operas with the in-universe show Invitation to Love. That’s more layers of deceit and drama than most televised love triangles.


10. “As The Stomach Turns,” The Carol Burnett Show

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The Carol Burnett Show poked fun at soaps with this enduring take on As The World Turns. In a case of life imitating art, one story involving demonic possession would go on to happen for “real” on Days of Our Lives.


11. Days of our Lives (Friends Edition)

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Still airing today, Days of Our Lives is one of the most famous soap operas of all time. They’re also excellent sports, as they allowed Friends star Joey Tribbiani to star as Dr Drake Ramoray, the only doctor to date his own stalker (while pretending to be his own evil twin). And then return after a brain-transplant.

And let’s not forget the greatest soap opera parody line ever written: “Come on Joey, you’re going up against a guy who survived his own cremation!”


12. Acorn Antiques

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First appearing on the BBC sketch comedy series Victoria Wood As Seen on TV, Acorn Antiques combines almost every low-budget soap opera trope into one amazing whole. The staff of a small town antique store suffer a disproportional number of amnesiac love-triangles, while entire storylines suddenly appear and disappear without warning or resolution. Acorn Antiques was so popular, it went on to become a hit West End musical.


13. “Point Place,” That 70s Show

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In a memorable That ’70s Show episode, an unemployed Red is reduced to watching soaps all day. He becomes obsessed despite the usual Red common-sense objections (like complaining that it’s impossible to fall in love with someone in a coma). His dreams render his own life as Point Place, a melodramatic nightmare where Kitty leaves him because he’s unemployed. (Click here to see all airings of That ’70s Show on IFC.)


14. The Spoils of Babylon

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Bursting from the minds of Will Ferrell and creators Andrew Steele and Matt Piedmont, The Spoils of Babylon was a spectacular parody of soap operas and epic mini-series like The Thorn Birds. Taking the parody even further, Ferrell himself played Eric Jonrosh, the author of the book on which the series was based. Jonrosh returned in The Spoils Before Dying, a jazzy murder mystery with its own share of soapy twists and turns.

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15. All My Children Finale, SNL

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SNL‘s final celebration of one of the biggest soaps of all time is interrupted by a relentless series of revelations from stage managers, lighting designers, make-up artists, and more. All of whom seem to have been married to or murdered by (or both) each other.

Jasper Redd talks about “Seinfeldian” influences, Southern styling and staying true to stand-up comedy

Jasper Redd talks about “Seinfeldian” influences, Southern styling and staying true to stand-up comedy (photo)

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Comedian Jasper Redd is an intriguing mass of contradictions. If he had his druthers, his entire routine would be all about race, but he counts Jerry Seinfeld’s trivial observations as a major influence. Even though he’s often dressed up in Western attire to celebrate his Tennessee heritage, he’s as savvy about the vagaries of Hollywood as any longtime Los Angeleno. And even though he’s being doing comedy for almost a decade professionally, he admits that it’s only recently that he’s felt confident about being a stand-up.

We were lucky enough to see Redd for the first time a few years ago when he performed in Los Angeles to commemorate the release of “Frankenhood,” a straight-to-DVD movie that was his first – and as of today, last – acting job. Since then, he’s been traveling across the country to various venues, including college campuses, and bringing with him a comedic style that’s equally contradictory: complex and plain-spoken, incisive and frivolous, his routines have an abstraction, and an absurdity, that make him a singular entity in the current comedy landscape. IFC sat down with Redd last weekend in Los Angeles to talk about how he got started as a comedian; additionally, he discussed his influences and inspirations, and offered a few insights about satisfying audiences while still staying true to himself.

How did you first get into stand-up? Were you always a funny kid?

I can’t say that I was a kid who was always funny, but I always liked comedy, and I liked funny people. So that was always my attraction. I always liked funny shows, funny movies, and hung around funny people. So I couldn’t say I was ever a class clown, but I had funny thoughts, and I didn’t express them until I got older. I didn’t really have an urge to perform growing up; I grew up drawing and whatnot – that’s what I was into. And then I got into music when I got into high school, but when I graduated, I kind of lost that spark for the music. And then comedy was just something I thought about doing, just to try it, and since I had nothing to lose – I was a janitor at the time, and I was like 20 years old – I just started writing down my thoughts, and I would later form them into jokes when I got off work. And in Tennessee where I lived, Knoxville, they didn’t have a comedy scene at the time, until around the year 2000, and I was wanting to get up somewhere but I had no venue. So that really set me back for a minute, but I kept writing my jokes, and I finally got the guts to do it in 2002, and I decided to move to San Francisco to give it a shot. When I started there in 2002, I started doing open mics, and how it is in San Francisco, it’s kind of like open mics kind of tie in with the club, so they’ll showcase you if you live up to the word on the street – they’ll put you in the rotation.

What comedians do you like or are you influenced by?

I was influenced by, you know, Seinfeld, and somewhat George Carlin, but I love a lot of comedians. As I studied and continue to study, I love a lot of people. Because when I first started doing comedy, my favorite comedian as a kid was Sinbad and Robin Harris. And then as I got older and I started doing comedy, I got into Richard Pryor, I got into Paul Mooney, I got into Steven Wright, Rodney Dangerfield. So I like a lot of cats, man – Bill Cosby – and I studied the legends. And then as far as the modern day [comedians], I love Patrice O’Neal, Mitch Hedberg, rest in peace, Daniel Tosh, Arj Barker, Patton Oswalt, Dwayne Kennedy.

What was the process of teaching yourself how to write jokes and refine your performance?

I was very influenced by Jerry Seinfeld and his comedy, and how he looked at things. He had a keen eye for trivial things, but it was always clever. And I wanted to emulate that, so when I got the chance, I got the book “Sein Language,” which is a book of his jokes, and that really helped me because I could see his joke structure – I could see his formula. And it’s kind of like, from there I was like, “I can do this.” I kind of used his book as a manual, so around the time I was living in Tennessee, that’s how I would write my jokes: I would put them side-to-side with his. And that was pretty much how I got influenced.

How long did it take you to formalize it, or to be able to do that naturally without using his material as a structural blueprint?

I really don’t feel confident that I got it down until about now; I’ve been doing it for nine years, and now I feel comfortable in the formula. I know how to make something funny – I believe. I feel 90 percent confident. But when I first started, my jokes would be hella long; they would be like essays, man. The punch line would be on the third page, you know what I mean? So I had to learn how to edit, to cut off the fat, so that’s how his book was so helpful; it helped me learn how to edit, to leave the necessary meat on the bones.

A lot of your comedy has a sense of abstraction to it. Is it difficult to know how much meat to leave on the bone, as you put it?

Yeah, man, I love the abstract. I love the absurd. I always try to bring that to my comedy, even though I may not be like that in person. I may not be all animated and stuff, but in my mind, I’m very animated, so when I get on stage, it’s kind of like I’m just trying to play with my toys that are in my head. But being that I’m Southern, and kind of slow, and kind of slow with delivery, that makes me stand out. And it’s not deliberate, that’s just how it is. So it’s just how it comes out.

In some of your older clips, you’re wearing a cowboy hat and jacket.

Yeah, that was a phase [laughs].

How much do you feel compelled to play up, or play down, your Southern heritage?

Being a performer, I kind of play with my appearance sometimes, just to get reactions on that from sometimes. I’ll try to get a laugh without even saying anything. So I’ll do that with the outfit sometimes, and around that time I was doing the cowboy thing – I called it “space cowboy.” That’s what I was going with at the time. So yeah, I’m into I guess a little bit of theatrics, as far as appearance is concerned; I’ll dress up.

It is tough to balance being yourself and adopting a stage persona, if that’s something you need to help you get up there and perform?

Uh, for me I just love new stuff. I’m always into new things. I try to be as prolific as I can, because that’s my nature, to try something new. That’s always my motivation, and hoping it’s funny (laughs).

Are you totally yourself on stage, though?

Yeah, to an extent. It’s like the persona is you, but it’s like the funny you. So you just amplify that on stage, in stand-up form. So it’s me, with everything coming out of my mouth, my antics, it’s all a production of Jasper Redd. So it is me.

Do you draw a line between that “funny” version of you and the “off-stage” you? Do you turn it on and off?

I guess so. People will say I have a dual personality, because when I’m not on stage, I’m pretty reserved, low-key, and mild-mannered, and on stage it is me turning it up a notch. Like I said, it’s me playing with my toys, which is my thoughts and observations. So there is definitely an “exit” and then there’s an “enter.”

As a comedian of color, where do you draw the line between addressing or talking about race, and just doing sort of colorblind material?

You know, I would probably talk about race in my act 100 percent if I could, because it’s so prevalent in my life – especially in Hollywood, where you see how it affects your opportunities. So it’s very prevalent, but I know that people don’t want to hear that all of the time; in fact, I think people are really getting past that as a generation. I think it’s an old issue in some ways, so in order to stay relevant, people don’t want to hear about it no more, so I try to bring different twists or spins to it if I do talk about it. I approach it in an absurd or funny way. So when I do talk about race, I try to talk about it in a lighthearted way, man, and not try to be a downer. But I talk about other things as well – like why firemen don’t carry water guns and stuff like that (laughs). Those are my type of observations, so I try to do both – and just be silly with all of it.

Was there a specific barometer for success you achieved that gave you the confidence that you say you now feel?

I think it’s just after doing something for a while, you get the hang of who you are as a person, and how you work and how you do your thing. You’ve got your whole body of work, like how I have a body of work after nine years, and I can go back and look at it and say, okay, this is how I operate. These are the things that I talk about. These are the things that I’m drawn to as a comedian. So once I know what my lane is, it’s easier for me to drive in it, you know what I’m saying? I know how to do what I do now; I know how to play my tune.

As you’ve been doing this more and more, do you tend to draw in a certain demographic or specific type of audience?

It’s a mix. Especially with having a Facebook page and a Twitter account, you see what people are coming to you because of your comedy, and it’s always a mix. I can’t say I have a specific type of audience; I get old folks, kids in high school, females, it’s all over the board. And I appreciate them all.

Are you interested in transitioning from stand-up into doing a TV show or being in movies?

I’m not really attracted to doing all of that stuff. I’ve tried it, I’ve tried to swim in those waters, and I ain’t really got the build for it – I don’t really like it. When I got into comedy, it was for comedy; it wasn’t for any other aspirations. But when you’re in show business and you have agents and you have managers representing you, they’ve got goals of their own for you. So I try to appease them somewhat and go on an audition every now and then to let them know that I appreciate their support, but at one point I just had to stop living a lie. And I’m glad my agents and managers are cool with it; at least, I think they’re cool with it. But I never was into the acting, or trying to write for a show or produce something. If it ain’t got nothing to do with stand-up, I’m pretty much not with it.

What’s the toughest part of doing stand-up? Is it creating new material?

Yeah, that’s it for me. It’s like being a musician, man, like after you write that one hit, people want that other one. So it’s about writing new material and not getting trapped into doing your old material and becoming complacent. Because you can easily just fall in love with your jokes, and never challenge yourself to do new stuff. So yeah, it’s a hard thing to balance, because you also want to get paid as a comedian, and you can always do jokes on an audience that’s paying to see you, and like I said, it’s like being a musician – they want to hear the hits! Do your songs on your next tour. So it’s a balance, man, a balance of breaking new material, trying it out, building confidence with it.

What’s coming up for you? What are you working on now?

Man, good question. Business is in slow motion. Actually, it’s kind of good, because I was on tour last year a lot at colleges, and that’s pretty much my bread and butter when it comes to doing gigs now. So I’m hoping to get some more college gigs on the calendar for the next year, and at the end of this year, hopefully. But that’s about it. I’ve got a web series on Youtube called Jazz Talk, that I do, which is me doing jokes with jazz music in the background. I do a lot of new material actually through Jazz Talk, so if people want to hear jokes, that what I’m doing. I’ve done 57 installments, so that’s what I’m up to; I’m trying to have more of a presence on the internet, because that’s the future. Or, the future is here (laughs).

What’s your favorite Jasper Redd stand-up? Tell us in the comments below or on Facebook or Twitter.

Harry Shearer discusses his comedy inspirations and why he doesn’t really go to movies anymore

Harry Shearer discusses his comedy inspirations and why he doesn’t really go to movies anymore (photo)

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Harry Shearer shouldn’t need any introduction for a well-traveled fan of comedy. Between The Simpsons, Christopher Guest films, the Le Show radio series, his “Saturday Night Live” work and, really, a vast number of other, varied projects, he’s definitely an entertainer who’s been around and seen a lot.

Shearer recently took a sidestep away from comedy to bring together a series of projects looking at post-Katrina New Orleans, most recently with his feature-length documentary “The Big Uneasy.” You don’t ever just stop “being funny” though, and the funnyman continues to ply his craft with laughter often following his every step.

We sat down to chat with Shearer recently about his work and his influences, what he finds funny and what his take is on the current state of comedy. You can check out what he had to say right here.

Let’s start with a really easy question: what is funny to you?

Anything that makes me laugh.

That is a great answer. [we laugh] How did you get into the craft? What drew you to comedy in the first place?

I was a child actor, I worked for Jack Benny for eight years. My parents were comedy fans, we listened to radio and watched television, all sorts of stuff, but the comedy sort of stuck with me. I was a huge fan of this remarkable comedy team named Bob & Ray who were just sort of my companions through childhood.

Then when I was in college, I edited the humor magazine. It wasn’t something I thought I was going to go into professionally. I thought I was going to have some sort of serious career as a grown-up, but there was always all this comedy lurking in the background and when I found that my dabbling in other fields was proving that I really wasn’t that interested in them I came scuttling back to comedy, and particularly satire.

I got involved with this radio show in Los Angeles that was making fun of the news everyday, and that was what sucked me back in. That’s how it happened.

You’ve obviously done a pretty wide range of work over the years. I’m curious– when you’re approached on the street by fans, what are they referencing more?

You never know. What I like about my career most is that I can never predict what they’re going to come up with. I mean, I was at this screening of my film last night and a guy came up to me and said, ‘I’m a visual artist and I just have to say, I saw your show’ — I do these video art shows from time to time — and he says, ‘I saw your show at the Eldridge Museum and I just wanted to [tell you how much I enjoyed it].’

Other people will talk about The Simpsons or Spinal Tap or the other Christopher Guest movies or my radio show or the fact that I wrote this very long piece about the Jerry Lewis Telethon one time or it’s known that I’ve seen [the lost, unreleased Jerry Lewis movie] The Day the Clown Cried. I mean, people come up to me with the most amazing range of things to say to me.

I find that sort of validating, because I think if you have a varied career and don’t keep coming to the audience with the same thing, you’ll get a varied audience which doesn’t keep coming to you with the same thing. It’s reciprocal. If you just hammer them over and over again with your standard thing, I think you’ll get tired of them coming to you with the same thing back.

I was always mindful of wanting to have a relationship with the audience that didn’t make me tired of them.

That’s a great attitude for an entertainer to have!

Well yeah! You hear these people who get into show business because they want to be famous, and then, ‘Oh, get those people away from me! They’re bothering me with the same thing!’ Well yeah, because you’re bothering them with the same thing over and over.

In that same vein of keeping your career varied, you’ve obviously worked with a pretty wide range of different styles. I mean The Simpsons obviously, the voice acting, you’ve been a writer, you’re on the radio, you do a lot of satire, Guest is improv… is there a particular style that you take to the most? Do you have a favorite?

No, I don’t think so. In terms of comedy, no. There’s stuff that is sort of on my least-favorite list. It’s stuff that I don’t do. I try not to do stuff that’s sort of… proudly dumb comedy. And I try not to be in anything violent. But those are my only [hesitations].
There is so much that makes me laugh, my taste in comedy runs all the way from Laurel & Hardy to Peter Cooke and Dudley Moore to Jack Benny to Martin Short and Catherine O’Hara and French & Saunders. A very wide range of people make me laugh, so there’s a very wide range of comedy that I sit and look at and say, ‘Gee, I’d like to do that.’

I notice that most of the names you listed aren’t really in the mix anymore today. I’ve got to ask the next obvious question here: what’s your take on comedy as it stands today? I would even get more specific than that and say ‘pop comedy,’ so your Apatow stuff–

I’ve never seen a Judd Apatow movie, so it’s not popular with me. I’m not saying that for any reason except, I see very few movies and the movies I do tend to see– I mean, I got tired of walking out. Not of Judd’s movies, of movies in general. And so I thought, why not skip the middleman and just stay home?

My wife is in the British Film Academy, so we get their equivalent of the Oscar DVD [screeners]. So there’s a buffet of movies we watch every holiday season which is basically those movies. So whatever that run of movies is [account for] about 90 percent of the movies that I see.

Every once in a great while I’ll go to a movie theater and usually regret that I did. But it’s no surprise that very few comedies make the awards list in Britain, just as it’s true in the United States. So it turns out that, as a result, that that list of movies we have every Christmas time, there are very few comedies on that list.

You mentioned before that you tend not to be a fan of movies that are ‘proudly dumb.’ Can you give me some examples? I know you don’t want to denigrate anyone’s work, but–

I really don’t. But everybody knows what I mean. Basically, all I can say is I would certainly not want to denigrate them because what I know about them is what I read and hear about them, which makes me not want to see them in the first place.
So I can’t speak from the authority of having sat through them. It just doesn’t sound like anything that I’d particularly like.

Well let’s flip that then. Are there any comedies, any stand-up comedians, young ones that you’ve seen and really enjoyed?

Well stand-up has never been my favorite form of comedy, which is why I don’t do it. Basically, as I said before, I’d see something and thing, ‘Boy, I’d like to do that.’ And that’s what would make me end up doing that.

The stand-up that’s working today — but he’s been working for 20 or more years now — that every time I see him I think, ‘God, he’s still a funny motherfucker,’ is a guy who mainly works in Vegas these days, he used to be on TV a lot, named George Wallace. He’s done something very interesting.

I don’t know if it’s still a trend in Vegas, but five years ago I heard it was a trend in Vegas, which was that the hotels… would book big shows, but if they were individual performers [the hotels] wouldn’t book them, they’d rent out the room to them. Something called ‘four-walling.’ So the performer would rent the room, do all the advertising, keep all the money.
George Wallace has been doing that at a hotel in Vegas for years, I guess it’s the last five years or so, and he’s doing very well at it, which is why we never see him anywhere outside of Vegas anymore. But I hear that his act in Vegas is even edgier than it was when it was on TV. Which doesn’t surprise me, since TV is sort of careful. Especially with that kind of comedy.

I tend to be more attentive to people who are playing characters, the people that I named [mostly] play characters, that’s who make me laugh. I won’t sit down and watch an evening of stand-up. That would be disturbing to me.

What is your favorite Harry Shearer project? Let us know in the comments section below or on Facebook and Twitter.

Our favorite rejected “Die Hard 5″ titles

Our favorite rejected “Die Hard 5″ titles (photo)

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It’s been four years since Bruce Willis (metaphorically) strapped on his wife beater and tossed off his shoes in the last “Die Hard” film, “Live Free or Die Hard.” Now we can say officially: it’ll be a year and a half more until he does it again.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Fox has scheduled the fifth “Die Hard” film, which will be titled — ahem — “A Good Day to Die Hard,” for February 14, 2013. Yep, Valentine’s Day. Ladies, I know how much you enjoy spending Valentine’s Day watching Bruce Willis action films, but try to contain your excitement. Thank you.

“A Good Day to Die Hard” is a decent title, if not as extravagantly silly as “Live Free or Die Hard.” I wasn’t convinced, though, that there wasn’t a better (or, at least, more extravagantly silly) alternate title out there. I wracked my brain, and put it to Twitter, and came up with this list of:

Rejected Titles for “Die Hard 5″
“Die Hard(ish)”
“A Horrible Way to Die Hard”
“Die Hard on a Die Hard Movie”
“Long is the Way, and Die Hard”
“Die Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger”
“Die Hard: The Dewey Cox Story”

(And From The Brilliant Men and Women Of Twitter)
“The Die Hardentity” –@AJHandegard
“Die H5rd” –@dankois
“Die Hard (Full Sequence)” –@highlolola
“Die Hard With the Wind” –@CoreyAtad
“Only the Good Die Hard” –@Matt_D_Cohen
“I Just Died Hard In Your Arms Tonight” –@davidlfear
“Die Hard Another Day” –@kenjfuj
“Spring Forward, Fall Back, Die Hard” –@dark77778

Got a good #rejectedDieHard5 title? Leave it in the comments below or on Facebook or Twitter.

The 10 most innovative stand-up comedy specials of all time (with video)

The 10 most innovative stand-up comedy specials of all time (with video) (photo)

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Stand-up comedy is one of the most beloved art forms there is, and it’s also one of the most difficult to master. For every Louis C.K., there are a hundred Jeff Dunhams. People often make lists of the best comedians of all time, or the best comedy albums, but when it comes to actual comedy TV specials, which is what every comedian strives for these days to get into heavy rotation on Comedy Central, it’s a different story. There’s a million of them – some are good, some are decent, some are iffy, and some are awful. Here, however, are some of the most innovative, groundbreaking comedy specials that have ever been made – shows you should really see if you’re a fan of comedy at all (Note: specials are listed chronologically).

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George Carlin at USC (1977)
Any mention of innovative comedy specials has to start with George Carlin, who forged the ideal comedian’s career model with his incredible longevity, unstoppable work ethic, and 14 HBO stand-up shows. This one in particular, his first, expanded on the controversial bit he became most known for – the Seven Words You Can Never Say On Television. Carlin started out his comedy career with his partner Jack Burns writing sketches and straight humor, believing he wanted to be like Danny Kaye. In the late 60s, he’d begun a unique transformation into a counterculture observer, being one of the first to really skewer conventional wisdom and that easygoing, free-flowing attitude was on full display, and at the time of this broadcast, the courts were deciding on whether or not his intellectual act was legally obscene, and it carried a stern warning before the encore about the bad words. That’s innovation, right from the get-go.

If we didn’t want to mention a wider variety of comics, Carlin would earn another spot on this list with Jammin’ In New York (1992), which he termed the turning point in his career. With a tighter structure and focused, aggressive timing, he completed a second reinvention of himself into a counter-everything observer, setting off in the direction he’d take for the rest of his life. He made giving up hope on his entire species brutally funny, noting “the planet is fine, the people are fucked.” He inspired generations of comedians with his absolutely unprecedented longevity. He’s the one, he’s the only.


Richard Pryor: Live in Concert (1978, film release in 1979)
Richard Pryor broke all the barriers and all the rules. In this concert filmed in Long Beach, CA, he established himself as one of the most influential comedians ever. He’d been working for quite some time before this as a controversial figure, after fights with censors that ended his NBC show early and a lot of public events in his personal life, but this show laid everything bare with hilariously blunt honesty, from his run-ins with the police, drug use and getting his ass whipped by his family to his near-fatal heart attack, hitting racial issues head-on with a fascinating amount of humanity. Pryor took this to another level with his 1982 show Live on the Sunset Strip, when he recounted the catastrophic fire that almost killed him. As crazy as his life was, he always found a way to make things completely relatable – to the point where it almost sounds normal and understandable that he’d be taking a gun and shooting out the wheels of his wife’s car so she won’t leave him.


Sam Kinison: Breaking The Rules (1987)
No one brought more sheer ferocity to the stage than this screaming ex-preacher from Peoria who left the ministry after the demise of his first marriage and became a comic to scream about women, religion and everything else under the sun. This special happened before he went full-on obnoxious rock star, when he was still diving headfirst into the open wound that was his emotional turmoil over two failed marriages and disenchantment with evangelism. There’s no filter for the anger, there’s no subtlety to graphic sexual conversation and there’s certainly nothing close to political correctness considering his underdeveloped attitude towards gays and the general ignorance about the AIDS epidemic (the 80s were a different time, you know). But there’s enough visceral venting and cleansing in this show, especially with the classic little piano-accompanied encore, that it feels like the Church of Sam never stopped, it just got a different kind of sermon.


Bill Hicks: Relentless (1991)
Nobody was going in the direction Bill Hicks went. He was far enough ahead of his time that his evisceration of the first Bush administration’s warmongering was still completely relevant when applied to the second Bush administration’s warmongering. He attacked religious hypocrisy, championed chain-smoking and pornography, encouraged everyone in the advertising business to commit suicide. His brutally, sometimes smugly honest and seemingly hateful derision was balanced with this strange optimism about how conceiving of the future of humanity in exploring outer space could be best achieved through hallucinogenic drug use. He was a walking cult of personality, crusading against every injustice he saw while constantly banging his head against the ignorance and apathy of the masses. He’s also the reason Denis Leary is not on this list.


Janeane Garofalo: HBO Comedy Half-Hour (1995)
She’s always been more of a acidic, sardonic commentator than a garden-variety comic, making no effort to be slick, polished or rhythmic in her delivery – she even brings a notebook on stage and apologizes to the audience about needing it due to her own bad memory. Here, fresh off of her bumpy stint on a transitional year of Saturday Night Live (which she described as making her feel like “the Native American who accepted the pox-infested blankets from the U.S. Cavalry”), Garofalo had a delightfully dangerous anger to work through about supermodel-as-celebrity as well as her own deep-seated neuroses, evidenced by her complete inability to understand applause. This is the one where she hit all those 90s hipster guys who were crushing on her square in the self-doubt by asking her audience if, during sex, they’ve ever wanted to just punch their partner in the face and yell “STOP IT! STOP FUCKING ME!” Many of us were never the same again.



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