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The 15 best movie interrogation scenes of all time (with video)

The 15 best movie interrogation scenes of all time (with video) (photo)

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It takes good cops and bad cops alike to make a good interrogation scene work. Movie history is littered with loose-canon detectives and unorthodox strategies for getting tight-lipped suspects to talk, and whether the scenes make you laugh at Harold and Kumar or cry because you’re watching James Bond get his scrotum smashed, they do tend to hold your attention.

From a little lighthearted bathroom-stall drowning to straight-up torture and other illegal behaviors, these are the question-and-answer sessions that get our hearts pounding. And until Pearl makes a full-length version of her “Good Cop, Baby Cop” short, this is our list of the best interrogation scenes moviedom has to offer.

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15. “Harold and Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay” (2008)

Ron Fox (Rob Corddry) just can’t accept that Harold (John Cho) and Kumar (Kal Penn) might love America, so he instead chooses to believe that they work for North Korea and Al Quaeda, which means they have to go to Guantanamo Bay. Post-9/11 humor isn’t always the easiest thing to pull off, but this scene broke the ice for the pair’s second movie outing together, and Corddy plays his part for all its worth.



14. “True Romance” (1993)

Written by Quentin Tarantino, “True Romance” is many things: a crime film, a chase film, a dark comedy. But it also has one of the funniest interrogation scenes of all time, courtesy of none other than Brad Pitt, an actor not typically associated with initiating laughter. In the scene, a group of mobsters arrive at an apartment looking for their drugs and instead only find lazy stoner Floyd (Pitt), roommate to the guy who may lead them to the goods. There’s a bloodier interrogation scene earlier in the movie with Dennis Hopper, but this one wins for being so damn quirky (and for blasting Soundgarden).


13. “Brazil” (1985)

Of all the scenes on our list, this is the only one featuring a guy who gets threatened with a lowered credit rating if he doesn’t cooperate. Director Terry Gilliam created the a cult legend in “Brazil,” and the creepy baby mask and epic zip-line rescue in this scene make it one of his most memorable.


12. “Casino Royale” (2006)

Daniel Craig debuted as James Bond with a convincing performance opposite actor Mads Mikkelsen. The torture scene where Le Chiffre (Mikkelsen) whacks Bond repeatedly where the sun don’t shine remains one of the most uncomfortable moments in Bond history, though. If you didn’t realize that the Bond franchise was entering a new era, you did after watching Craig take this beating.


11. “There’s Something About Mary” (1998)

Ben Stiller handily wins “Best Accidental Confession” for the way he responds to police when he unknowingly admits to killing a hitchhiker that he picked up. Unfortunately for his character Ted, the mistake lands him in a world full of pain when he goes on to inadvertently claim responsibility for even more killings. “There’s Something About Mary” is crammed full of hilariously well-acted scenes, but this is easily one of the best.


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Face Melting Cameos

The 10 Most Metal Pop Culture Cameos

Glenn Danzig drops by Portlandia tonight at 10P on IFC.

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Glenn Danzig rocks harder than granite. In his 60 years, he’s mastered punk with The Misfits, slayed metal with the eponymous Danzig, and generally melted faces with the force of his voice. And thanks to Fred and Carrie, he’s now stopping by tonight’s brand new Portlandia so we can finally get to see what “Evil Elvis” is like when he hits the beach. To celebrate his appearance, we put together our favorite metal moments from pop culture, from the sublime to the absurd.

10. Cannibal Corpse meets Ace Ventura

Back in the ’90s,  Cannibal Corpse was just a small time band from Upstate New York, plying their death metal wares wherever they could find a crowd, when a call from Jim Carry transformed their lives. Turns out the actor was a fan, and wanted them for a cameo in his new movie, Ace Ventura: Pet Detective. The band had a European tour coming up, and were wary of being made fun of, so they turned it down. Thankfully, the rubber-faced In Living Color vet wouldn’t take no for an answer, proving that you don’t need to have a lot of fans, just the right ones.


9. AC/DC in Private Parts

Howard Stern’s autobiographical film, based on his book of the same name, followed his rise in the world of radio and pop culture. For a man surrounded by naked ladies and adoring fans, it’s hard to track the exact moment he made it. But rocking out with AC/DC in the middle of Central Park, as throngs of fans clamor to get a piece of you, seems like it comes pretty close. You can actually see Stern go from hit host to radio god in this clip, as “You Shook Me All Night Long” blasts in the background.


8. Judas Priest meets The Simpsons

When you want to blast a bunch of peace-loving hippies out on their asses, you’re going to need some death metal. At least, that’s what the folks at The Simpsons thought when they set up this cameo from the metal gods. Unfortunately, thanks to a hearty online backlash, the writers of the classic series were soon informed that Judas Priest, while many things, are not in fact “death metal.” This led to the most Simpson-esque apology ever. Rock on, Bartman. Rock on.


7. Anthrax on Married…With Children

What do you get when Married…with Children spoofs My Dinner With Andre, substituting the erudite playwrights for a band so metal they piss rust? Well, for starters, a lot of headbanging, property destruction and blown eardrums. And much like everything else in life, Al seems to have missed the fun.


6. Motorhead rocks out on The Young Ones

The Young Ones didn’t just premiere on BBC2 in 1982 — it kicked the doors down to a new way of doing comedy. A full-on assault on the staid state of sitcoms, the show brought a punk rock vibe to the tired format, and in the process helped jumpstart a comedy revolution. For instance, where an old sitcom would just cut from one scene to the next, The Young Ones choose to have Lemmy and his crew deliver a raw version of “Ace of Spades.” The general attitude seemed to be, you don’t like this? Well, then F— you!


5. Red and Kitty Meet Kiss on That ’70s Show

Carsey-Werner Productions

Carsey-Werner Productions

Long before they were banished to playing arena football games, Kiss was the hottest ticket in rock. The gang from That ’70s Show got to live out every ’70s teen’s dream when they were set loose backstage at a Kiss concert, taking full advantage of groupies, ganja and hard rock.


4. Ronnie James Dio in Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny (NSFW, people!)

What does a young boy do when he was born to rock, and the world won’t let him? What tight compadre does he pray to for guidance and some sweet licks? If you’re a young Jables, half of “the world’s most awesome band,” you bow your head to Ronnie James Dio, aka the guy who freaking taught the world how to do the “Metal Horns.” Never before has a rock god been so literal than in this clip that turns it up to eleven.


3. Ozzy Osbourne in Trick or Treat

It’s hard to tell if Ozzy was trying his hardest here, or just didn’t give a flying f–k. What is clear is that, either way, it doesn’t really matter. Ozzy’s approach to acting seems to lean more heavily on Jack Daniels than sense memory, and yet seeing the slurry English rocker play a sex-obsessed televangelist is so ridiculous, he gets a free pass. Taking part in the cult horror Trick or Treat, Ozzy proves that he makes things better just by showing up. Because that’s exactly what he did here. Showed up. And it rocks.


2. Glenn Danzig on Portlandia

Danzig seems to be coming out of a self imposed exile these days. He just signed with a record company, and his appearance on Portlandia is reminding everyone how kick ass he truly is. Who else but “The Other Man in Black” could help Portland’s resident goths figure out what to wear to the beach? Carrie Brownstein called Danzig “amazing,” and he called Fred “a genius,” so this was a rare love fest for the progenitor of horror punk.


1. Alice Cooper in Wayne’s World

It’s surprising, sure, but for a scene that contains no music whatsoever, it’s probably the most famous metal moment in the history of film. When Alice Cooper informed Wayne and Garth that Milwaukee is actually pronounced “Milly-way-kay” back in 1992, he created one of the most famous scenes in comedy history. What’s more metal than that? Much like Wayne and Garth, we truly are not worthy.

Five actors who made uglier onscreen women than Adam Sandler

Five actors who made uglier onscreen women than Adam Sandler (photo)

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I don’t think Adam Sandler will take offense if I say he makes a very, very ugly woman in “Jack and Jill.” Hell, that’s one of the main jokes of the movie — it’s even the joke on the movie’s poster — Sandler doesn’t look much like a woman, but nobody in the film seems to notice (one character even finds him attractive, more on that in a moment).

Still, Sandler’s not the first dude to look like a lady for laughs, nor is he the ugliest. He’s definitely walking in the high-heeled footsteps of some fine (but not necessarily fine looking) actors. Here’s five guys whom made even gnarlier looking woman onscreen than the former Happy Gilmore.


Jack Lemmon in “Some Like It Hot” (1959)
Directed by Billy Wilder

Although Sandler’s playing a woman in “Jack and Jill” as opposed to a man crossdressing as a woman, his film definitely owes a certain debt to “Some Like It Hot,” Billy Wilder’s classic comedy about two male musicians who witness the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre and go on the run as women in an all-girl band. In particular, Al Pacino’s role as Al Pacino, eccentric actor and millionaire who falls in love with a guy-as-girl evokes definite echoes of Joe E. Brown’s Osgood Fielding III, eccentric millionaire who falls in love with a guy-as-girl, in his case Jack Lemmon. As opposed to his co-star, Tony Curtis, who was actually quite fetching in drag, Lemmon was just a mess as “Josephine.” Which, of course, made Brown and Lemmon’s scenes that much funnier.


Edward D. Wood Jr. in “Glen or Glenda” (1953)
Directed by Edward D. Wood Jr.

In contrast, Ed Wood’s drag scenes in “Glen or Glenda” weren’t intended as comedy. Wood enjoyed dressing in women’s clothing in his private life and he made “Glen or Glenda” as a sincere if strange defense of transvestitism. The scenes illustrating Glen’s inner turmoil play out with all sorts of deranged, hallucinogenic imagery. They’ve also got Bela Lugosi screaming “Pull the string!” for no reason whatsoever. The finale, seen below, culminates in a genuinely poignant moment, when Glen’s girlfriend learns the truth and offers him the sweater off her back. It’s kind of a beautiful scene, though it doesn’t make the sight of Wood in angora any prettier.


Robert Downey Jr. in “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” (2011)
Directed by Guy Ritchie

It takes real skill — or questionable looks — to qualify for this list on the basis of a trailer alone. But take a look at said trailer, embedded below, and just try to disagree with me that Robert Downey Jr. makes one homely lady. Presumably he just puts on this “disguise” for the one sequence during this upcoming sequel to 2009’s “Sherlock Holmes.” The sequence looks spectacular. The disguise, not so much.


Harland Williams in “Sorority Boys” (2002)
Directed by Wallace Wolodarsky

Frat boys Dave (Barry Watson), Adam (Michael Rosenbaum), and Doofer (Harland Williams) get kicked out of their frat and lose all their money, then decide to pledge a sorority where rent is free. “We don’t have to be babes, just believable!” says Dave, a.k.a. Daisy as they discuss the plan. On what planet is Williams’ “Roberta” believable? Maybe I need to get new glasses. Or get rid of my glasses altogether. The fact that Williams was 40 and playing a college student might have been part of the problem.


Arnold Schwarzenegger in “Junior” (1994)
Directed by Ivan Reitman

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. Is it also worth a thousand screams of terror? You tell me. Yikes.


What actor made the ugliest onscreen woman? Give us your pick in the comments below or on Facebook and Twitter.

Five Kickstarter-funded comic book documentaries to look out for

Five Kickstarter-funded comic book documentaries to look out for (photo)

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If you need $100 million to make a CGI-heavy action film, the project-funding website Kickstarter should definitely not be the first place you look. However, Kickstarter is becoming a hot spot to hunt down dollars for more modest indie projects, and comics-related documentary pitches in particular are becoming more and more common.

Five such comics documentaries have met their funding needs, and the dollar amounts they’ve been able to raise are impressive. Their topics range from historical investigations into censorship to massive interview compilations looking at what current creators grew up reading and what goes on behind the industry’s closed doors.



“Stripped: The Comics Documentary”

Status: Funded!

Creators Dave Kellett and Fred Schroeder set out to make a feature-length documentary about where comics come from and where they are headed. With at least 60 interviews from around the industry, it looks like they’re already off to a great start.

They initially sought $58,000 for “Stripped,” but funding has since eclipsed the $100,000 mark. If their scope and Kickstarter success translate into a story that’s as fascinating as their trailer suggests, Kellett and Schroeder could set a new standard for future producers and directors to look at.



“Warren Ellis: Captured Ghosts”

Status: Funded!

If you spend any time at all on the Internet or reading comic books, you should already be at least casually familiar with writer Warren Ellis. The filmmakers, Patrick Meaney and Jordan Rennert already have one comic-creator doc under their belt with “Grant Morrison: Talking With Gods” (2010), and their ambitious follow-up aims to dissect one of the medium’s most beloved (and foul-mouthed) visionaries.

You may have to keep the little ones away from this film, but it’s sure to be an interesting watch.



“Untold Tales of the Comic Book Industry”

Status: Funded!

Spearheaded by comic book writer Brandon Jerwa, “Untold Tales” lays out a few of the same premises as “Stripped,” but seems to focus more on the rising and falling of the superhero market. The interviews in the trailer capture a behind-the-scenes feel from the periphery of the convention scene, and Jerwa is pooling the insights from publishers, as well as big-name creators such as Erik Larsen and Ben Templesmith.

It’s a documentary being made with love, and we look forward to seeing what emerges from Jerwa’s efforts, especially now that it has eclipsed the $19,000 mark on Kickstarter.



“Diagram for Delinquents”

Status: Funded!

If you thought that video games were the biggest over-blown threat ever to attract government attention, you may need to track down a copy of director Robert A. Emmons, Jr.’s film about the greatest real-life villain ever to attack comic books. “Diagram for Delinquents” looks at the life and work of psychiatrist and Seduction of the Innocent author Fredric Wertham.

Wertham’s efforts triggered book burnings and even congressional hearings that pushed comics publishers into a new era. The trailer has character, and the topics Emmons addresses will be of interest to comics readers from any decade.



“Cartoon College”

Status: Initial goal reached, but have since asked for $6000 more

Have you ever wanted to go to school to become a cartoonist? Filmmakers Tara Wray and Josh Melrod set out to see what goes on in the lives of students at Vermont’s Center for Cartoon Studies. They traveled around the U.S. and Canada interviewing professors and creators and seeing where students traveled to get their work out into the wild.

Judging from their description, “Cartoon College” may have the best diversity of sources of any of these documentaries. Moreover, they are also analyzing how the nature of the industry impacts the lives of aspiring artists.

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Which one of these comic book documentaries makes you want to check it out? Let us know in the comments below or on Facebook or Twitter.

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