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“Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory,” reviewed

“Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory,” reviewed (photo)

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With its third entry, the documentary series “Paradise Lost” earns its title: these films now constitute an epic tragedy of American injustice. The first film, “Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills,” premiered in 1996; the second, “Paradise Lost 2: Revelations,” debuted in 2000. Now “Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory” returns to the aftermath of the same horrific crime fifteen years later. Characters from all sides of the case — investigators and prosecutors, victims and the accused — reflect on who they were then and who they are now. Directors Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky cut back and forth between the past and the present. The addition of time adds scope, insight and poignancy to everything we see.

Berlinger and Sinofsky have been chronicling the case against Damien Echols, Jason Baldwin, and Jessie Misskelley — collectively known as the West Memphis Three — since they were first arrested for the murders of three young Arkansas boys back in 1993. From the very beginning, the filmmakers were skeptical of the official version of events put forth by police, who claimed that Echols was the ringleader of a local Satanic cult, and that he, Baldwin, and Misskelley committed the crime as a sort of religious sacrifice. Their skepticism was well-founded since there was no evidence that the West Memphis 3 were involved in any way, except for a confession by Misskelley procured under questionable circumstances.

You might expect the fact that the West Memphis Three were released from prison in August to blunt “Paradise Lost 3″‘s impact. It doesn’t. Berlinger and Sinofsky do an outstanding job of contextualizing this summer’s surprising turn of events, and of explaining the reasons why they happened. They also explain why the State of Arkansas would release the West Memphis Three for pleading guilty (via an obscure legal technicality called an Alford plea) after they spent decades futilely protesting their innocence (the short answer: to avoid admitting their own guilt and risking a civil suit). The scene where the Three are released after they plead guilty plays like a something out of Terry Gilliam’s “Brazil,” only this isn’t a glimpse into a dystopian fantasy of society’s dark future, it’s a glimpse of our actual society’s dark present.

The filmmakers also do a remarkable job of updating us on the lives of all their characters. The most interesting one might by John Mark Byers, the stepfather of one of the victims who Berlinger and Sinofsky incorrectly fingered as a possible suspect in “Paradise Lost 2” (whoops). After years of Bible-thumping and fire-and-brimstone preaching against Echols, Byers seems to have found peace and a certain amount of clarity. “What’s right and what’s wrong are two different things,” he says. “And the right thing is these boys are innocent.” Byers even has a “Free the West Memphis Three” bumper sticker on his truck. Whodathunkit?

Over their nearly twenty year journey with the West Memphis Three, Berlinger and Sinofsky have become more than storytellers; they’re now a fundamental part of the story itself. The first film led directly to the rise of a nationwide grassroots movement to free the West Memphis Three which led directly to the outside funding that led directly to new avenues in their defense. When Byers presented the directors with a blood-flecked knife as a gift, they handed the knife over to police and helped spur an investigation into his possible role in the murders. Berlinger and Sinofsky’s actions throughout the “Paradise Lost” saga may raise ethical questions about the appropriate behavior of documentarians, but those are dwarfed by the ethical questions raised about the American legal system, which is revealed in these films to be deeply damaged if not irreparably broken. So thank goodness Berlinger and Sinofsky were there to watch this all happen, and to encourage people to stand up against injustice. It’s good when a film moves people to tears. It’s better when it moves them to action.

“Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory” screens tonight at the New York Film Festival. If you see it, tell us what you think; leave us a comment below or write to us on Facebook and Twitter.

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Inauguration Alternative

Bill Murray On Repeat

It's a movie "Murray-thon" all-day Friday on IFC.

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Photo Credit: Everett Collection, GIFs courtesy of GIPHY

Democrats, Republicans and Millennials agree: 2017 is shaping up to be a spectacle — a spectacle that really kicks into high gear this Friday with the presidential inauguration. Not only will the new POTUS swear in, but all the Country’s highest offices will be filled. It’s a daunting prospect, and to feel a little anxious about it is only normal. But if your anxiety is snowballing into panic, we have a solution:
Bill Murray.

He’s the human embodiment of a mental “Happy Place”, and there’s really no problem he can’t solve. So, with that in mind, how about we all set aside reality for a moment and let Bill take the pain away by imagining a top-shelf White House cabinet filled exclusively by his signature characters. Here are a few hypothetical appointments for your consideration…

Secretary of Defense:
Bill Murray from Stripes

His incompetence is balanced by charm, and dumb luck is inexplicably on his side. America could do worse.

Secretary of State:
Bill Murray from Lost In Translation

A seasoned globetrotter steeped in regional traditions who has the respect of the whole wide world. And he kills Costello in karaoke, which is very important.

Press Secretary:
Bill Murray from Ghostbusters

“Cats and dogs, living together. Mass hysteria.” Dude knows how to brief a room.

Secretary of Health and Human Services:
Bill Murray from What About Bob.

A doctor-approved people person who knows that progress is measured in baby steps.

Secretary of Energy:
Bill Murray from Groundhog Day

Let’s be honest, this world is going to need a lot of do-overs.

Feeling better? Hold on to that bliss. And enjoy a healthy alternative to the inauguration brouhaha with multiple Murrays all Friday long in an IFC movie marathon including Kingpin, Zombieland, Ghostbusters, and Ghostbusters II.

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Home Run

Hank Azaria Gets Thrown A Curve Ball

Brockmire Premieres April 5 at 10P

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Photo Credit: Everett Collection

Unless you’ve somehow missed every episode of the Simpsons since 1989, then surely you know that Hank Azaria is one of the most important character actors of our time. He’s so prolific and his voice is so dynamic that he’s responsible for more iconic personalities than most folks realize. Basically, he’s the great and powerful Oz — except that when you pull back the curtain the truth is actually more impressive. And now Hank is coming to IFC to bring yet another character to the TV pop culture hive mind in the new series Brockmire. Check out the trailer below.

Based on the following Funny or Die short and co-starring Amanda Peet, Brockmire follows the story of imploded major league sportscaster Jim Brockmire as he tries to resurrect his career by calling plays for a floundering minor league team in a podunk town.

The series is written by Joel Church-Cooper (Undateable) and produced by Funny or Die’s Mike Farah and Joe Farrell, meaning that there’s funny in front of the camera, funny behind the camera–funny all around. Sounds like a ball to us.

Brockmire premieres April 5 at 10P on IFC.

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Car Notes

Portlandia On People Who Can’t Park

Portlandia returns tonight at 10P on IFC.

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If flagrant bad parking takes nerve, then retaliatory note writing takes neuroses. Watch Fred and Carrie take passive aggression to next level in Car Notes, the new Portlandia web series presented by Subaru. The first episode is yours right here and now, and you can see every installment of Car Notes anytime online, on the IFC app and on demand.

Portlandia returns tonight at 10P on IFC.

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