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Judd Apatow 30-year career timeline: from stand-up comedy to his “Knocked Up” spin-off

Judd Apatow 30-year career timeline: from stand-up comedy to his “Knocked Up” spin-off (photo)

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Judd Apatow was defined by the comedy of his generation and he’s turned around and used that to define the comedy of the next generation. This is not just a list of things Judd has done in the past, but it’s also a chronicling of his rise to power. Here is the life of a comedy nerd made good – made very, very good.


1967:
Born in Flushing, New York, to real estate developer Maury Apatow and Tami Shad, who divorced when he was 12. He also has an older brother Robert and a younger sister Mia. He lived with his dad most of the time and grew up watching shows like Dinah Shore, Merv Griffin, The Tonight Show, Late Night with David Letterman, etc. “I was watching TV until about 3-3:30 to 1:30 in the morning for years.” He spent a lot of time alone in his room, but lest you think that’s sad, he says he was “laughing his ass off watching Jay Leno in 1979 on The Mike Douglas Show.” His favorites also included Steve Martin, David Brenner, Jeff Altman and even Michael Keaton’s early stand-up work. He was even transcribing episodes of “Saturday Night Live” at age 10. This is a comedy nerd writ large.

1982-3:
In 9th grade, his mother gets a job seating people at a comedy club, and he would go there all the time to watch comics – Paul Provenza was the first young comedian he ever saw. He later realized his mom’s job was likely the worst ever, but says “I like to think she did it because she knew I would like it. Like a gift to me.” He later got a job as a busboy at Rick Messina’s East Side Comedy Club so he could watch sets from people like Eddie Murphy and a rookie Rosie O’Donnell

1984:
Worked at the Syosset High School 10-watt radio station WKWZ and hosted the “Club Comedy” program, which allowed a 16-year-old kid to wrangle interviews with guys like Jerry Seinfeld, Jay Leno, Garry Shandling, John Candy, Harold Ramis, Howard Stern and even Steve Allen. Some of these interviews can be heard on Apatow’s 2-part episode of Marc Maron’s WTF podcast (where the quotes for this piece are coming from), and they really helped him learn exactly how the comedy business works.

1985:
Started stand-up comedy during his senior year of high school. Moved to Los Angeles to join the screenwriting program at USC, where he started organizing comedy nights on campus, volunteering at Comedy Relief and working at the Improv introducing other comics. Soon figures out he’s a better writer than a comic, thinking he didn’t have a strong enough point of view, so he starts writing for other comedians, too, leading to him becoming co-producers on some of their specials – such as Roseanne Barr.

1990:
Meets Ben Stiller outside of an Elvis Costello show, a man he’ll eventually name as the beginning of modern comedy. Also during this time, Apatow is sharing an apartment with Adam Sandler.

1992:
Appears on HBO’s 15th Annual Young Comedians Special, also becomes producer of the critically acclaimed “The Ben Stiller Show” on Fox, which nonetheless gets cancelled the next year. “I didn’t know what the hell I was doing,” he said. “I just was the guy trying to hopefully figure out how to not have Ben realize I didn’t know how to do anything but write stand-up jokes. I was just keeping my mouth shut and listening to Ben. I was just faking it.”

1993:
Hired as a writer and producer for “The Larry Sanders Show,” starring Shandling, who he credits as his mentor for steering him towards character-driven comedy.

1994:
Becomes a staff writer and consulting producer on the Jon Lovitz animated series “The Critic.”

1995:
Wrote and produced the comedy “Heavyweights” where Ben Stiller plays a fitness guru who takes over a fat camp for kids. Well-received but barely heard of.

1996:
Jim Carrey’s “The Cable Guy” is released, a movie he was hired to re-write, on the set of which he met Leslie Mann, his future wife (one year later, even) and star of several of his movies. He also guest-starred on Adam Sandler’s album “What The Hell Happened To Me?” and wrote and produced “Celtic Pride,” a basketball comedy with Damon Wayans and Dan Aykroyd.

1999:
“Freaks and Geeks” premieres on NBC, the most personal project he’d done to that point as a director, writer and producer, co-creating with Paul Feig. Set in the early 1980s and starring Seth Rogen, Jason Segel, James Franco, Linda Cardellini, Martin Starr, Samm Levine, Busy Philips and John Francis Daley, it followed the lives of a trio of nerds, a group of outcasts and a girl transitioning between them, and also featured a geek using “The Jerk” as a barometer of whether or not he should continue dating the cheerleader he’d miraculously landed. It’s also notable for the most noble depiction of a Dungeons and Dragons game ever. It had a devoted fan following, but not enough to keep it from being cancelled after only 12 of its 18 episodes had aired.

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Brock Hard

Brockmire’s Guide To Grabbing Life By The D***

Catch up on the full season of Brockmire now.

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“Lucy, put supper on the stove, my dear, because this ballgame is over!”

Brockmire has officially closed out its rookie season. Miss the finale episode? A handful of episodes? The whole blessed season?? You can see it all from the beginning, starting right here.

And you should get started, because every minute you spend otherwise will be a minute spent not living your best life. That’s right, there are very important life lessons that Brockmire hid in plain sight—lessons that, when applied thoughtfully, can improve every aspect of your awesome existence. Let’s dive into some sage nuggets from what we call the Book of Jim.

Life Should Be Spiked, Not Watered Down.

That’s not just a fancy metaphor. As Brockmire points out, water tastes “awful. 70% of the water is made up of that shit?” Life is short, water sucks, live like you mean it.

There Are Only Three Types of People

“Poor people, rich people and famous people. Rich people are just poor people with money, so the only worthwhile thing is being famous.” So next time your rich friends act all high and mighty, politely remind them that they’re worthless in the eyes of even the most minor celebrities.

There’s Always A Reason To Get Out Of Bed

And 99% of the time that reason is the urge to pee. It’s nature’s way of saying “seize the day.”

There’s More To Life Than Playing Games

“Baseball can’t compete with p0rnography. Nothing can.” Nothing you do or ever will do can be more important to people than p0rn. Get off your high horse.

A Little Empathy Goes A Long Way

Especially if you’ve taken someone else’s Plan B by mistake.

Our Weaknesses Can Be Our Greatest Strengths

Tyrion Lannister said something similar. Hard to tell who said it with more colorful profanity. Wise sentiments all around.

Big Things Come To Those Who Wait

When you’re looking for a sign, the universe will drop you a big one. You’re the sh*t, universe.

And Of Course…

Need more life lessons from the Book of Jim? Catch up on Brockmire on the IFC App.

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Oh Mama

Mommie May I?

Mommie Dearest Is On Repeat All Mothers Day Long On IFC

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The cult-classic movie Mommie Dearest is a game-changer. If you’ve seen it even just once (but come on, who sees it just once?), then you already know what we’re talking about.

But if you haven’t seen it, then let us break it down for you. Really quick, we promise, we’ll even list things out to spare you the reading of a paragraph:

1. It’s the 1981 biopic based on the memoir of Christina Crawford, Hollywood icon Joan Crawford’s adopted daughter.
2. Faye Dunaway plays Joan. And boy does she play her. Loud and over-reactive.
3. It was intended as a drama, but…
4. Waaaaaay over-the-top performances and bargain-basement dialogue rendered it an accidental comedy.
5. It’s a cult classic, and you’re the last person to see it.

Not sold? Don’t believe it’s going to change your life? Ok, maybe over-the-top acting isn’t your thing, or perhaps you don’t like the lingering electricity of a good primal scream, or Joan Crawford is your personal icon and you can’t bear to see her cast in such a creepy light.

But none of that matters.

What’s important is that seeing this movie gives you permission to react to minor repeat annoyances with unrestrained histrionics.

That there is a key moment. Is she crazy? Yeah. But she’s also right. Shoulder nipples are horrible, wire hangers are the worst, and yelling about it feels strangely justified. She did it, we can do it. Precedent set. You’re welcome.

So what else can we yell about? Channel your inner Joan and consider the following list offenses when choosing your next meltdown.

Improperly Hung Toilet Paper

Misplaced Apostrophes

Coldplay at Karaoke

Dad Jokes

Gluten Free Pizza

James Franco

The list of potential pedestrian grievances is actually quite daunting, but when IFC airs Mommie Dearest non-stop for a full day, you’ll have 24 bonus hours to mull it over. 24 bonus hours to nail that lunatic shriek. 24 bonus hours to remember that, really, your mom is comparatively the best.

So please, celebrate Mother’s Day with Mommie Dearest on IFC and at IFC.com. And for the love of god—NO WIRE HANGERS EVER.

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Breaking News

From Canada With Love

Baroness von Sketch Show premieres this summer on IFC.

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Breaking news that (finally) isn’t apocalyptic!

IFC announced today that it acquired acclaimed Canadian comedy series Baroness von Sketch Show, slated to make its US of A premiere this summer. And yes, it’s important to note that it’s a Canadian sketch comedy series, because Canada is currently a shining beacon of civilization in the western hemisphere, and Baroness von Sketch Show reflects that light in every way possible.

The series is fronted entirely by women, which isn’t unusual in the sketch comedy world but is quite rare in the televised sketch comedy world. Punchy, smart, and provocative, each episode of Baroness von Sketch Show touches upon outrageous-yet-relatable real world subjects in ways both unexpected and deeply satisfying: soccer moms, awkward office birthday parties, being over 40 in a gym locker room…dry shampoo…

Indiewire called it “The Best Comedy You’ve Never Seen” and The National Post said that it’s “the funniest thing on Canadian television since Kids In The Hall.” And that’s saying a lot, because Canadians are goddamn hilarious.

Get a good taste of BVSS in the following sketch, which envisions a future Global Summit run entirely by women. It’s a future we’re personally ready for.

Baroness Von Sketch Show premieres later this summer on IFC.

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