Joel Schumacher on his “Dark Knight” movie that never happened, and Hollywood’s best Bruce Wayne

Joel Schumacher on his “Dark Knight” movie that never happened, and Hollywood’s best Bruce Wayne (photo)

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Earlier this week, we heard from “Trespass” director Joel Schumacher about Christopher Nolan’s record-breaking run with Batman — a character near and dear to his heart after he made not one but two films featuring the DC Comics icon.

While Schumacher’s first adventure with Batman was a box-office success — 1995’s “Batman Forever” — his 1997 “Batman & Robin” sequel didn’t fare as well. Along with near-universal negative reviews, the film failed to perform at the box office and eventually became known as the film that “killed” the Batman franchise (until Nolan came along, of course).

“Sequels are made for one reason,” Schumacher told IFC during an interview promoting his new film “Trespass” with Nicolas Cage. “Because ‘Batman Forever’ was an unexpected sensation, and the second-biggest grossing movie for the whole year, and everyone made so much money out of ‘Batman Forever,’ it was always, ‘more, more more.'”

“I broke a rule of mine, which is never to do a sequel of anything,” he said of “Batman & Robin.” “They wanted me to do sequels for ‘St. Elmo’s Fire,’ ‘Flatliners,’ ‘Lost Boys,’ and some of the other films I’ve done, and I always knew that if you get lucky, walk away. But I was shooting ‘A Time To Kill’ and the studio had been very generous to me, and much was expected of me by the toy manufacturers and the Warner Bros. stores.”

Still, Schumacher stopped short of downplaying his role in what many regard as one of the worst superhero movies ever made.

“I’m responsible for everything. I said, ‘yes’ and I took it on,” he said. “It’s not my favorite movie I’ve ever made, but I’m proud of my cast and I’m proud of all the artists who worked on it. I take full responsibility for ‘Batman & Robin.'”

Still, despite the rampant negativity surrounding Schumacher’s mainstream-friendly contributions to the live-action Batman movie-verse, there are quite a few things he’s quick to boast about regarding his Batman. For example, he knows he’s not alone in considering “Batman Forever” star Val Kilmer one of the best versions of Bruce Wayne to appear on the big screen.

“For me, Val Kilmer was the best Batman,” he said. “I thought he looked great in the costume, and I thought he brought a depth to the role. I thought the relationship between Val and Nicole Kidman was very sexy. Jim Carrey, of course, was the perfect Riddler. And then I had the great Tommy Lee Jones and a lot of other great people are in that movie.”

Schumacher also revealed that, if he’d gotten his way, his second Batman film would have been more in line with Nolan’s “Dark Knight” instead of the studio-friendly “Batman & Robin.”

“I think I’m the most envious of Chris Nolan because he got to do ‘The Dark Knight’ — and that’s the one I begged to do as my second Batman film,” he said. “I wanted to do a whole other thing, because we had kind of re-invented franchise with Val as Batman and it was a very young, sexy, and much less expensive movie. We brought in Robin and I wanted to make ‘The Dark Knight’ desperately, but the studio didn’t want that and it’s their money and they’re my bosses.”

What do you think Schumacher’s version of “The Dark Knight” would’ve been like? Chime in below or on Facebook or Twitter.


'Soft' Rock

Get Gentle and Soft With The Blue Jean Committee’s New EP

The Documentary Now! band has a new EP.

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The Blue Jean Committee is about to head straight up the charts with their new song “Gentle & Soft.” Is it us, or did it just get really smooth in here?

The band, whose tumultuous history was chronicled in a compelling two-part episode of Documentary Now!, is back with an extremely soft bullet with the release of Catalina Breeze, an actual 12″ EP with actual songs that you can actually (and should actually) buy. As Fred Armisen, who sings in the Blue Jean Committee along with his Documentary Now! cohort Bill Hadertold EW, he wanted the band to capture the ’70s California soft rock sound. “So the best way to do it for us would be to just spell it out and call the song ‘Gentle and Soft,'” Armisen said.

The EP, which will be released on November 20th, also features the classic BJC tracks “Mama You’re a Dancer,” “Walking Shoes” and the titular jam all about relaxing Catalina breezes. True to its name, the Catalina Breeze EP will hit you like the wind, rushing your hair into a halo, which is as gentle and soft as it comes. Head over to Drag City to listen to song samples and grab the EP.

For more Documentary Now!, check out the complete archive, episode clips, and music from the show.

Kurtwood Smith 1920

That '70s Mofo

5 Movies That Prove Kurtwood Smith Is a National Treasure

Catch Kurtwood Smith on That '70s Show airing now on IFC.

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Believe it or not, veteran character actor Kurtwood Smith has a warm, endearing smile. It just took audiences over a decade to actually see him in a role that didn’t focus on his ability to scare children with his villainous gaze and determined grin. Thanks to That ’70s Show, we now associate him most as Red Forman, the curmudgeonly but loveable father to Eric Forman and patriarch to the gang of burnouts who hung out in his basement. Smith has had a long career of playing characters that weren’t always as soft and cuddly as Red Forman. Here are five of the most memorable Kurtwood Smith roles in which he didn’t have to hilariously teach a “foreign kid” to stop saying “Amedica.”

1. Flashpoint (1984)

Flashpoint may be a forgotten thriller from 1984 starring Kris Kristofferson and Treat Williams as border cops who find a dead body and a ton of cash, but Kurtwood Smith shines in a role as a crooked federal agent. This character is as sinister a son-of-a-bitch as they come, with contempt practically oozing out from his eyes. You are more likely to find a VHS copy of Flashpoint at a random flea market than catch it on Netflix, but take a look at just how good he is at being a bad guy as he delivers a John Malkovich-level performance.

2. Robocop (1987)

Clarence Boddiker, the villain Smith played in Robocop, is still remembered fondly by sci-fi fans for the Jack Nicholson-like glee that he displayed for causing mayhem and inflicting pain. Any scene that has Kurtwood Smith entering a room delivering the line “B–ches leave!,” and ends with him pulling a grenade pin out with his mouth, then killing a coked-up ‘80s yuppie, will surely elevate a film’s cult status.

3. Dead Poets Society (1989)

Red Forman might have had a hard time expressing outward displays of affection for his son Eric, but compared to Mr. Perry in Dead Poets Society, he’s a regular Phil Dunphy. To say this character was chilling is an understatement. Smith nailed the cold detachment of a father determined to make his son live the life he was being groomed for. If you haven’t seen Dead Poets Society, in the words of Red Forman, what are you waiting for, “dumbass”???

4. Citizen Ruth (1996)

Smith got the chance to act in Alexander Payne’s first movie, a dark comedy in which Laura Dern’s Ruth plays a poor pregnant woman who likes to huff paint and gets mixed up with both sides of the abortion debate. Norm Stoney (Smith) and his wife enjoy nothing more on a beautiful day than to take the kids down to the free clinic, scarf a box of donuts and shout “murderer” at the people entering the building. A still relevant satire, the film gave Smith the chance to display his comedic chops before That ’70s Show. Though we doubt that Red would’ve let a “dirty hippy” like Ruth stay in his home.

5. True Believer (1989)

Smith shines as a no-nonsense prosecutor in this underrated crime thriller where James Woods and Robert Downey Jr. attempt to defend a man wrongfully accused of a gang murder.

Documentary Now Dronez

Fred Roasts Vice

Fred Armisen Roasted Vice CEO as His ‘Dronez’ Character From Documentary Now!

Documentary Now! returns in 2016.

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Normally, receiving a prestigious award and praise from your peers would be a validating affair, but it’s a decidedly different experience when every facet of your personal and professional life is ruthlessly mocked by a dais of roasters. Such was the case for Vice CEO and gonzo journalist Shane Smith who got both barrels from comics and associates in honor of his Frank Stanton Award win for Excellence in Communication.

Along with Johnny Knoxville, HBO CEO Richard Plepler (who referenced Smith’s recent collaboration with President Obama by joking, “The President called Shane to thank him for the interview and the delightful contact high…”), and other media elites, Fred Armisen took Smith to the mat while dressed as Jeremiah, one of the many gonzo journalists who can be seen getting in over their heads in the Documentary Now! episode “Dronez: The Hunt for El Chingon.”

Fred Armisen Dronez

And in case you missed Fred and Bill Hader as the Vice-like reporters of “Dronez,” you can stream the entire episode of Documentary Now! for free right now.

David Krumholtz Harold and Kumar

Goldstein Rules

David Krumholtz’s 10 Funniest Movie Roles

David Krumholtz stops by Comedy Bang! Bang! tonight at 11P.

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If you’ve seen David Krumholtz in Gigi Does It, then you know he’s a performer with serious range. It’s hard to believe the guy you loved in films like Harold & Kumar and 10 Things I Hate About You is under all that makeup. To help get you ready for David’s appearance on this week’s Comedy Bang! Bang!, check out some of his funniest movie performances below.

10.The Santa Clause, Bernard the Elf

Walt Disney Pictures

Krumholtz was a memorable part of the Tim Allen holiday favorite, playing an overworked, Type A elf just trying to keep the North Pole moving.

9. Slums of Beverly Hills, Ben

Krumholtz played the Broadway bound brother of a rapidly developing Natasha Lyonne in this indie darling.

8. The Big Ask, Andrew

Krumholtz’s friends would do anything for him…well, almost anything, in this dark comedy about big favors.

7. Addams Family Values, Joel Glicker

Neurotic Joel Glicker didn’t have much going for him, but sometimes the right amount of desperation can be attractive. Just ask Wednesday Addams.

6. Serenity, Mr. Universe

Krumholtz supplied some comedic relief to Joss Whedon’s space Western as a hacker who’s funny right up until the moment he breaks your heart.

5. Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story, Schwartzberg

Columbia Pictures

Columbia Pictures

Krumholtz shines almost as much as his staches and ‘dos in this cult classic send up of musician biopics.

4. This Is the End, David Krumholtz

Krumholtz got to play one of his funniest parts ever in this Seth Rogen/James Franco comedy as, well, David Krumholtz.

3. Superbad, Benji Austin

Krumholtz wanted Michael Cera to sing him a little song, and he wouldn’t take no for an answer. Maybe that had something to do with all the cocaine.

2. 10 Things I Hate About You, Michael

Touchstone Pictures

Krumholtz became an icon for a generation when he allowed Andrew Keegan to draw a male member on his face in this teen classic.

1. Harold and Kumar trilogyGoldstein

Little did we know that Goldstein’s search for Katie Homes’ nude scenes would launch one of Krumholtz’s most beloved characters, popping up in all three Harold & Kumar movies.

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