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Thoughts on “Hugo”‘s work-in-progress screening

Thoughts on “Hugo”‘s work-in-progress screening (photo)

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The surprise work-in-progress screening at The New York Film Festival turned out to be Martin Scorsese‘s “Hugo,” and the director himself was on hand to present his almost completed 3D family film. As Scorsese explained before the movie, “Hugo” really is a work-in-progress: a few CGI shots were unfinished and a few green screens were visible. The color correction wasn’t done, and the score by Howard Shore wasn’t complete either. Shown in this state, a review of the film would be inappropriate. But I think it’s fair to present a few random thoughts on “Hugo” as it stands now, starting with this one:

-I liked the film a lot. I’m not sure how my appreciation will translate to a wider audience — and some of my colleagues sounded much more mixed than I was after the screening — but I was very satisfied.

The film’s schmaltzy trailer may have left some die-hard Marty fans scratching their heads why Mr. “Mean Streets” would make a heartwarming family film, but “Hugo” is actually the Scorsesiest Scorsese movie in years. Only it’s not the kind of Scorsese movie you’re thinking of.

-Speaking of that trailer: if the trailer for “Drive” was so misleading that it garnered a lawsuit, then the trailer for “Hugo” might get dragged before an international criminal tribunal. It paints a very incomplete portrait of the movie, of what it’s about and even who it’s about.

-Don’t bust out the pitchforks and storm Paramount’s marketing department just yet. Once you see the movie, it will be easy to see why the trailer was so cagey. “Hugo” is a tough movie to sell — or write about — without spoiling things. In this case, I really believe they had the viewers’ best interest at heart (or heart-shaped keyhole).

-The plot, sans spoilers: Hugo Cabret (Asa Butterfield) is an orphan living in a Paris train station during the 1920s. After his father dies (Jude Law, in a brief role), his uncle (Ray Winstone, even more briefly) adopts him and puts him to work minding, winding, and repairing the station’s enormous clocktower. While Hugo keeps the clocks running, he also searches for — and occasionally steals — tools and parts for the one thing his father left him: a broken automaton that could deliver an important message. But stealing the parts he needs puts him directly in the crosshairs of the station’s cruel inspector (Sacha Baron Cohen) and the bitter owner of its trinket and toy store (Ben Kinglsey).

-“Hugo” is one of those movies set in France where everyone speaks with a British accent.

-The trailer hints at the role magic plays in the film, but it goes much deeper than that. “Hugo” is movie as magic trick. Scorsese convinces us he’s made one film, then uses some crafty sleight-of-hand to transform “Hugo” before our eyes.

-Does Scorsese single-handedly save the medium of 3D? No. Does he prove reports of 3D’s death may have been greatly exaggerated? Absolutely. “Hugo”‘s 3D inarguably enhances the experience of watching the film, and Scorsese clearly put a lot of thought into its execution. He essentially upends the classical model of 3D cinematography, in which objects in the frame constantly move towards the lens. Scorsese does the opposite; he constantly moves the lens towards the objects in the frame, playing as much with our perception of movement as our perception of depth. He also uses steam, dust, and falling snow to deftly create a sense of true three dimensional space and he playfully tours through the Parisian train station during a couple of signature long takes (imagine the Copa shot from “Goodfellas” with a 3D CGI assist).

-Between “Hugo” and “Midnight in Paris,” 2011’s been a good year for New York filmmakers in the City of Light.

-I often watch movies and wonder: where is the director in this material? In “Hugo,” there’s no need to wonder. There is even a character that I believe stands in for Scorsese himself. He is played by Michael Stuhlbarg.

-“Hugo” is a fine title for the film, but the name of a previous Scorsese project might have made an even more appropriate one. I’m referring to this — but know that by clicking that link you’re approaching the door that opens up all the spoilers I’ve been trying to hold back. Walk through it at your own risk.

“Hugo” opens November 23. Are you looking forward to it? Tell us in the comments below or on Facebook and Twitter.

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Millennial Wisdom

Charles Speaks For Us All

Get to know Charles, the social media whiz of Brockmire.

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He may be an unlikely radio producer Brockmire, but Charles is #1 when it comes to delivering quips that tie a nice little bow on the absurdity of any given situation.

Charles also perfectly captures the jaded outlook of Millennials. Or at least Millennials as mythologized by marketers and news idiots. You know who you are.

Played superbly by Tyrel Jackson Williams, Charles’s quippy nuggets target just about any subject matter, from entry-level jobs in social media (“I plan on getting some experience here, then moving to New York to finally start my life.”) to the ramifications of fictional celebrity hookups (“Drake and Taylor Swift are dating! Albums y’all!”). But where he really nails the whole Millennial POV thing is when he comments on America’s second favorite past-time after type II diabetes: baseball.

Here are a few pearls.

On Baseball’s Lasting Cultural Relevance

“Baseball’s one of those old-timey things you don’t need anymore. Like cursive. Or email.”

On The Dramatic Value Of Double-Headers

“The only thing dumber than playing two boring-ass baseball games in one day is putting a two-hour delay between the boring-ass games.”

On Sartorial Tradition

“Is dressing badly just a thing for baseball, because that would explain his jacket.”

On Baseball, In A Nutshell

“Baseball is a f-cked up sport, and I want you to know it.”


Learn more about Charles in the behind-the-scenes video below.

And if you were born before the late ’80s and want to know what the kids think about Baseball, watch Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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Crown Jules

Amanda Peet FTW on Brockmire

Amanda Peet brings it on Brockmire Wednesday at 10P on IFC.

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GIFS via Giphy

On Brockmire, Jules is the unexpected yin to Jim Brockmire’s yang. Which is saying a lot, because Brockmire’s yang is way out there. Played by Amanda Peet, Jules is hard-drinking, truth-spewing, baseball-loving…everything Brockmire is, and perhaps what he never expected to encounter in another human.

“We’re the same level of functional alcoholic.”


But Jules takes that commonality and transforms it into something special: a new beginning. A new beginning for failing minor league baseball team “The Frackers”, who suddenly about-face into a winning streak; and a new beginning for Brockmire, whose life gets a jumpstart when Jules lures him back to baseball. As for herself, her unexpected connection with Brockmire gives her own life a surprising and much needed goose.

“You’re a Goddamn Disaster and you’re starting To look good to me.”

This palpable dynamic adds depth and complexity to the narrative and pushes the series far beyond expected comedy. See for yourself in this behind-the-scenes video (and brace yourself for a unforgettable description of Brockmire’s genitals)…

Want more about Amanda Peet? She’s all over the place, and has even penned a recent self-reflective piece in the New York Times.

And of course you can watch the Jim-Jules relationship hysterically unfold in new episodes of Brockmire, every Wednesday at 10PM on IFC.

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Draught Pick

Sam Adams “Keeps It Brockmire”

All New Brockmire airs Wednesdays at 10P on IFC.

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From baseball to beer, Jim Brockmire calls ’em like he sees ’em.

via GIPHY

It’s no wonder at all, then, that Sam Adams would reach out to Brockmire to be their shockingly-honest (and inevitably short-term) new spokesperson. Unscripted and unrestrained, he’ll talk straight about Sam—and we’ll take his word. Check out this new testimonial for proof:

See more Brockmire Wednesdays at 10P on IFC, presented by Samuel Adams. Good f***** beer.

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