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Exclusive: “Attack the Block” gets eyed for television spin-off and American remake, plus what the sequel could look like

Exclusive: “Attack the Block” gets eyed for television spin-off and American remake, plus what the sequel could look like (photo)

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Ever since the heavily acclaimed “Attack the Block” hit theaters earlier this year, the main question on the minds of fans was simply, “Are we going to see another one?” Well, now we have slightly more of an answer. Director Joe Cornish has confirmed to IFC News that several options for the franchise are now on the table, including a sequel, a television series and an American remake.

“Attack the Block” — produced by “Shaun of the Dead” helmer Edgar Wright — finds a gang of inner-city London youth suddenly embroiled in an interstellar conflict as dozens of snarling, ape-like aliens crash land around their hood. The movie was hailed as a breakout indie hit, breathing fresh air into the overexposed alien attack genre and igniting a love affair with fans.

At the San Diego Comic-Con this past summer, director Joe Cornish mentioned that Wright had proposed a sequel idea but wouldn’t divulge any more than that. Cornish is still tight-lipped on what that suggestion was, but in an interview with IFC at New York Comic Con promoting the October 25th DVD and Blu-ray release, he was more willing to reveal a sequel idea from his newcomer star John Boyega, who plays the teenage group leader and chief monster-killer Moses.

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“[He] keeps coming up with amazing ideas,” says Cornish of Boyega. “He has this image of a bigger alien attack on London, as if the attack we saw in ‘Attack the Block’ was just the [first] wave and there’s another wave of bigger creatures. And he described to me this image of Moses leading a whole army of hood kids across the Thames, next to the houses of Parliament.”

“No, his image was even better,” Cornish continued. “He had an image of Moses on a police horse. You know the police in London who have those horses they use in riots…somehow Moses has got onto one of those horses. So he’s on a horse leading this army of South London kids across the river to take on this bigger wave of aliens. So yeah it’s really fun to think of stuff like that and what we could do.”

Apart from cast suggestions on what a sequel could look like, Cornish also divulged that other possible adaptations are in very early discussions. “We’ve had approaches for a remake and a sequel. We’ve had approaches for a TV show to spin off it. But it’s very early days, you know. So it’s not out of the question but very early days, and I’d certainly like to do something different for my next thing if I get a chance to do a next thing.”

What would you like to see from an “Attack the Block” sequel? Would you be up for an American remake? Speak your mind below or on Facebook or Twitter.

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Face Melting Cameos

The 10 Most Metal Pop Culture Cameos

Glenn Danzig drops by Portlandia tonight at 10P on IFC.

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Glenn Danzig rocks harder than granite. In his 60 years, he’s mastered punk with The Misfits, slayed metal with the eponymous Danzig, and generally melted faces with the force of his voice. And thanks to Fred and Carrie, he’s now stopping by tonight’s brand new Portlandia so we can finally get to see what “Evil Elvis” is like when he hits the beach. To celebrate his appearance, we put together our favorite metal moments from pop culture, from the sublime to the absurd.

10. Cannibal Corpse meets Ace Ventura

Back in the ’90s,  Cannibal Corpse was just a small time band from Upstate New York, plying their death metal wares wherever they could find a crowd, when a call from Jim Carry transformed their lives. Turns out the actor was a fan, and wanted them for a cameo in his new movie, Ace Ventura: Pet Detective. The band had a European tour coming up, and were wary of being made fun of, so they turned it down. Thankfully, the rubber-faced In Living Color vet wouldn’t take no for an answer, proving that you don’t need to have a lot of fans, just the right ones.


9. AC/DC in Private Parts

Howard Stern’s autobiographical film, based on his book of the same name, followed his rise in the world of radio and pop culture. For a man surrounded by naked ladies and adoring fans, it’s hard to track the exact moment he made it. But rocking out with AC/DC in the middle of Central Park, as throngs of fans clamor to get a piece of you, seems like it comes pretty close. You can actually see Stern go from hit host to radio god in this clip, as “You Shook Me All Night Long” blasts in the background.


8. Judas Priest meets The Simpsons

When you want to blast a bunch of peace-loving hippies out on their asses, you’re going to need some death metal. At least, that’s what the folks at The Simpsons thought when they set up this cameo from the metal gods. Unfortunately, thanks to a hearty online backlash, the writers of the classic series were soon informed that Judas Priest, while many things, are not in fact “death metal.” This led to the most Simpson-esque apology ever. Rock on, Bartman. Rock on.


7. Anthrax on Married…With Children

What do you get when Married…with Children spoofs My Dinner With Andre, substituting the erudite playwrights for a band so metal they piss rust? Well, for starters, a lot of headbanging, property destruction and blown eardrums. And much like everything else in life, Al seems to have missed the fun.


6. Motorhead rocks out on The Young Ones

The Young Ones didn’t just premiere on BBC2 in 1982 — it kicked the doors down to a new way of doing comedy. A full-on assault on the staid state of sitcoms, the show brought a punk rock vibe to the tired format, and in the process helped jumpstart a comedy revolution. For instance, where an old sitcom would just cut from one scene to the next, The Young Ones choose to have Lemmy and his crew deliver a raw version of “Ace of Spades.” The general attitude seemed to be, you don’t like this? Well, then F— you!


5. Red and Kitty Meet Kiss on That ’70s Show

Carsey-Werner Productions

Carsey-Werner Productions

Long before they were banished to playing arena football games, Kiss was the hottest ticket in rock. The gang from That ’70s Show got to live out every ’70s teen’s dream when they were set loose backstage at a Kiss concert, taking full advantage of groupies, ganja and hard rock.


4. Ronnie James Dio in Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny (NSFW, people!)

What does a young boy do when he was born to rock, and the world won’t let him? What tight compadre does he pray to for guidance and some sweet licks? If you’re a young Jables, half of “the world’s most awesome band,” you bow your head to Ronnie James Dio, aka the guy who freaking taught the world how to do the “Metal Horns.” Never before has a rock god been so literal than in this clip that turns it up to eleven.


3. Ozzy Osbourne in Trick or Treat

It’s hard to tell if Ozzy was trying his hardest here, or just didn’t give a flying f–k. What is clear is that, either way, it doesn’t really matter. Ozzy’s approach to acting seems to lean more heavily on Jack Daniels than sense memory, and yet seeing the slurry English rocker play a sex-obsessed televangelist is so ridiculous, he gets a free pass. Taking part in the cult horror Trick or Treat, Ozzy proves that he makes things better just by showing up. Because that’s exactly what he did here. Showed up. And it rocks.


2. Glenn Danzig on Portlandia

Danzig seems to be coming out of a self imposed exile these days. He just signed with a record company, and his appearance on Portlandia is reminding everyone how kick ass he truly is. Who else but “The Other Man in Black” could help Portland’s resident goths figure out what to wear to the beach? Carrie Brownstein called Danzig “amazing,” and he called Fred “a genius,” so this was a rare love fest for the progenitor of horror punk.


1. Alice Cooper in Wayne’s World

It’s surprising, sure, but for a scene that contains no music whatsoever, it’s probably the most famous metal moment in the history of film. When Alice Cooper informed Wayne and Garth that Milwaukee is actually pronounced “Milly-way-kay” back in 1992, he created one of the most famous scenes in comedy history. What’s more metal than that? Much like Wayne and Garth, we truly are not worthy.

Joel Schumacher explains why he isn’t surprised by Christopher Nolan’s “The Dark Knight” success

Joel Schumacher explains why he isn’t surprised by Christopher Nolan’s “The Dark Knight” success (photo)

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When “The Dark Knight Rises” hits theaters next year, it will present the final chapter in Christopher Nolan’s record-breaking Batman trilogy that relaunched, redefined, and reinvigorated DC’s iconic superhero. And while there’s been no shortage of reboots on the big and small screens lately, few have been as successful as the “Inception” filmmaker’s take on Gotham’s favorite vigilante — especially when you consider the franchise’s status prior to Nolan’s arrival.

After finding success in 1995’s “Batman Forever,” which pitted the hero (played by Val Kilmer) against Riddler (Jim Carrey) and Two-Face (Tommy Lee Jones), director Joel Schumacher was convinced to return for a sequel. The resulting film, 1997’s critically panned “Batman & Robin,” was such an overwhelming disappointment that it became known as the film that “killed” the Batman franchise.

Thankfully, Nolan came along in 2005 with “Batman Begins” — a film that not only exorcised the character’s big-screen demons, but earned him praise from filmmakers throughout the industry for his inventive re-imagining of the shadowy crusader. One of those filmmakers happy to give credit where it’s due is Schumacher himself.

“Chris Nolan is one of my favorite directors,” Schumacher told IFC while discussing his upcoming film “Trespass,” starring Nicolas Cage. “Years ago I was doing press in Paris, and I was with Eli Richbourg. We were looking for a movie that wasn’t in French . . . and we saw this British film called ‘Following.’ It’s in black and white and it’s Chris Nolan’s first film, and . . . I just thought it was the work of a brilliant young director. So I always had him in the back of my mind, thinking, ‘We’re going to hear from this guy, big time.’ Then I saw ‘Memento’ and the promise was fulfilled very fast.”

“I think Chris Nolan is brilliant and I think Heath [Ledger] was extraordinary [in ‘The Dark Knight.’],” he added. “Chris is a master and he’s so young, and god knows what’s coming from him now.”

And from the sound of things, Schumacher is just as interested as the rest of us in seeing what Nolan has planned for “The Dark Knight Rises.”

“I always look forward to what he’s going to do next,” he said. “Unlike some of my peers in the business, I am inspired by films I love, not jealous of them. When I see a film that disappoints — and I’m sure I’ve made some of them — that kind of depresses me. I don’t go to the theater to dislike a movie, and I don’t think the audience does either.”

“Actually, it’s critics that go to a movie to dislike it,” he laughed. “They don’t go as fans.”

And while he’s had to take some flak over the years for “Batman & Robin,” his first Batman film still holds a place in his heart.

As he sees it, every director who’s had a chance to get behind the camera for a Batman movie has created a version of the character that is quintessentially their own — whether it’s Nolan’s Batman, his Batman, or the version presented by their predecessor, Tim Burton.

“I think that Tim Burton’s Batman movies are so Tim Burton,” he explained. “And I think ‘Batman Forever’ is really my movie.”

What do you think of Schumacher’s comments regarding Christopher Nolan’s Batman movies? Chime in below or on Facebook or Twitter.

Nacho Vigalondo on “Extraterrestrial” and personal philosophies of filmmaking and karaoke

Nacho Vigalondo on “Extraterrestrial” and personal philosophies of filmmaking and karaoke (photo)

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Of course I interviewed director Nacho Vigalondo in a karaoke room. If you want to find Vigalondo at Fantastic Fest, a karaoke room at The Highball (a.k.a. the Alamo Drafthouse’s bar-slash-bowling-alley-slash-karaoke-palace) is always the best place to look. The man takes karaoke seriously, as evidenced by this photo he posted on Twitter just last night. During our interview about his new movie “Extraterrestrial,” Vigalondo repeatedly picked up and flipped through one of the Highball’s binders of karaoke songs, like a junkie absent-mindedly fiddling with a needle while waiting for his dealer to bring his next fix.

As a bit of a karaoke nut myself, I had to start our conversation there. And, as it turned out, Vigalondo’s personal philosophy about karaoke informs his personal philosophy about filmmaking which, in turn, guided the making of “Extraterrestrial.” Vigalondo likes to perform songs he’s never tried before; in turn, his new film is a major departure from the intricate cinematic gamesmanship of his last project, the cult sci-fi hit “Timecrimes.” The science-fiction in “Extraterrestrial” is really just the large-scale background for a small-scale character study about two people, Julio (Julián Villagrán) and Julia (Michelle Jenner), who awaken in an apartment together after a night of drunken carousing neither can remember and find the city around them abandoned while flying saucers hover in the sky. As the mysteries grow so does the sexual tension, as Julia’s neighbor Angel (Carlos Areces) and her boyfriend Carlos (Raúl Cimas) both arrive and complicate the survivors’ living arrangements and mutual attraction.

After the karaoke questions were out of the way, and with star Villagrán looking on, I asked Vigalondo why he wanted to follow the popular “Timecrimes” with such a different kind of sci-fi movie, where his love of UFOs comes from, and whether his very unusual alien invasion movie — in which the invasion happens entirely off-screen — was made in reaction to the way Hollywood usually treats these stories (i.e. with a lot of money and little character). And when the interview was over, the director grabbed the remote that powered the room’s karaoke machine and fired it up.

You’re looking at the Highball karaoke list, so let’s begin there. What’s the best karaoke song ever?

It might be “Sweet Child of Mine” because it’s long and epic and catchy. If you’re drunk, it’s a lot of fun to sing.

What does it take to be a karaoke expert?

It’s not about being an expert. I love karaoke because it’s one of the few activities in which failure is more important than winning.

That’s true. A spectacular karaoke failure is arguably more fun to watch than a really good rendition of something.

Yeah, I don’t like when people pick songs they know how to sing. For example, yesterday I was singing Gnarls Barkley’s “Crazy” and the reason I picked it is because I never sang that before. I don’t want things to work well at karaoke. When you go to karaoke and you see a girl who sings in an awesome way, it doesn’t make sense. You have to fail.

How does this theory of karaoke apply to filmmaking? Do you have to be willing to fail spectacularly there as well?

[laughs] Okay, yeah.

You have to be willing to try something you haven’t tried before.


Totally. And you have to be wild somehow. You have to irrational at times, and you have to have fun. Some directors hate shooting; I love to shoot. Shooting for me is not the dark part of the contract. I really love shooting because shooting is one of the few occasions you have in life to have a real adventure. We don’t go to the jungle anymore, because the jungle is already explored. We don’t go to the North Pole, we’re not going to solve a mystery, but when you’re shooting, taking a bunch of adults into a strange place and ordering them to make ridiculous things that don’t make sense until the very end when you watch it all edited together, it’s an awesome thing. Anything can happen when you’re shooting.


For example, one of the most complicated days in the shoot was when we were shooting the fight sequence [between Julio, Angel, and Carlos] because that was the very last day we had in that flat. That was the very end of the day and we were exhausted and we didn’t have any kind of special safety equipment. If a shot didn’t work, we didn’t have time to reset it and because we had to leave in an hour. It was like a climax in a film, like at the end of “Back to the Future” when they only have one chance to catch the lightning bolt with the wire. That happens all the time when you make a film. You have just one chance to make things good. I love that.

Was the movie inspired in some way by watching other alien movies and feeling like your own reaction to that kind of event wasn’t represented?

No, I didn’t want “Extraterrestrial” to go against any other movie; I just wanted to make this one. I’m not against movies like “District 9″ or “Battle: Los Angeles” and I didn’t want to make a movie that’s against those kind of movies. In fact, I love alien invasion films. I’m not guided by hate of those other films. I just loved this idea about this guy who wanted to be close to this girl. I loved this story.

How much of the movie was driven by desire to make something different than “Timecrimes?”

That’s a deliberate thing. You know what happened with M. Night Shyamalan? He made three films with a similar structure, and then everyone began expecting the same thing from him again and again. Once he made “Lady in the Water” — which I don’t think is as bad as people say — people reacted negatively because they were expecting a big twist at the end. I prefer to be free; I don’t want to be a victim of my own success in that way. So, yeah, I have ideas for other mystery films with big twists. But when I laid out all my ideas on the table, I picked “Extraterrestrial” because it was the total opposite of “Timecrimes.” I don’t want to follow a path.

It’s not what people expect from me, and I know that some people are going to be disappointed with it for that reason; I read some reviews that were disappointed that it’s not “Timecrimes.” I’ll accept disappointing people that way if we can surprise other people in a good way. In other words, I prefer to play with expectations instead of satisfying expectations.

I love the way the film opens almost like an old “Twilight Zone” episode with all this ambiguity. The characters don’t quite know where they are or what’s happened, and to the audience, anything feels possible. How do you direct the actors to create that sense of ambiguity? You have to be very cagey with what you reveal or don’t reveal.

What I told [lead actor] Julián [Villagrán] was, “Have you ever had a massive hangover?” That’s it. When a movie’s ambiguous, it’s the movie itself that’s ambiguous, not the elements inside it. I can’t tell the actor to play ambiguous. That’s not fair. He’s just a guy who wakes up in the morning with a hangover.

I had written a sequence in which we see the characters meet the previous night. It was such a funny sequence; one of my favorite scenes in the script. But I found that the movie played better without it.

A few years before “Extraterrestrial” you made a similarly themed

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