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Sex in “Straw Dogs”: The remake of a rape

Sex in “Straw Dogs”: The remake of a rape (photo)

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In some ways, Straw Dogs is an odd choice for a remake – for a movie about “asking for it,” it certainly wasn’t. Nor, as Monday’s box office results reflect, was much of an audience asking for it, either. (It came in fifth place).

Sam Peckinpah’s 1971 original was reviled, most notably by Peckinpah champion Pauline Kael, as “sexual fascism.” A key scene – a double rape – provoked arguments about the director’s motivation, since the picture seemed to argue that the woman was “asking for it,” which Peckinpah himself confirmed in an infamous Playboy interview. (In that same interview, he also claimed that most women were whores, and if they weren’t, they weren’t being honest.)

So why remake a film noted for its misogyny? “That’s the very reason to make this film in the first place,” director Rod Lurie explained on the red carpet at a Cinema Society screening last week. He calls it an “intellectual exercise”: “How do you tell the same story, eliminate his philosophy, and put mine into it? Is it possible?”

Let’s see. For starters, both “Straw Dogs” are based on a book – The Siege of Trencher’s Farm, in which there is no rape, and the main violence is a home invasion. The rape comes about, in the original, partly because the female character, Amy Sumner (played by Susan George), has been walking around without a bra on and has accidentally revealed her breasts to some construction workers; but then upon realizing that they’re staring at her through the window, she lingers to let them look.

Her new husband, David (played by Dustin Hoffman), is presented as a pacifist intellectual, who isn’t around to defend her at the crucial moment – because he allowed himself to be tricked earlier, and failed to take a stand when the workers committed their first act of violence: hanging the family cat in the closet. When the first rape happens, Amy barely struggles, and even expresses pleasure. “People often asked, ‘Why is she smiling? Why is she cuddling with her rapist?'” Lurie noted. And the danger with that presentation, he said, is “there were young boys watching this film who went, ‘She said no, but he f—ed her, and she’s OK with it.'”

The rape scene was part of a larger issue, however – a philosophy Peckinpah believed in called the “territorial imperative.” “It said that all men are genetically coded to violence.” Lurie said. “And so the most violent among us are going to be in charge. The woman will not gravitate to the best man for them, they’re going to gravitate to the alpha male — to the biggest bull in the herd.” This is why, after the rape, Amy’s loyalty seems divided – the rapist seems to understand her more than her husband does, and she only seems to respect her husband after he kills several men defending their home.

“I’m not buying into that whatsoever,” Lurie said. “So what you’ll find in my version of the film, it doesn’t go that way at all.”

Lurie changed the setting from Cornwall, England, to the South, to place the action in a small town where football, hunting, and churchgoing are the major pastimes. “They have preachers talking about a vengeful God who will spite you from the earth; and the flood, and Armageddon,” he said. So while Lurie does not agree with Peckinpah that human beings are normally conditioned to violence, in this town, they are, “like it’s no big deal to them.” And his David (played by James Marsden) hasn’t been raised with violence in his life, “except what he reads in history.” (In the movie, David is scripting a film about the WWII battle of Stalingrad, a battle which was partly fought by women with brooms and kids with bricks, “a metaphor for everything that happens in the film,” Lurie said).

“We’re capable of violence if we’re protecting ourselves,” Lurie said. “So when David becomes violent at the end, it’s because he has to, not because, like in the Peckinpah film, there’s a rage being released that was there anyway.”

And when that violence at the end happens in the remake, David is not alone in defending his home. “By the end of the original, everyone jumps ship. Even his wife deserts him,” Marsden said. “In this film, they sort of stay together as a couple, and fight together. And throughout, they’ve had more discussion as a couple, like about the doors being locked.”

The couple also have more discussion about whether it’s appropriate for Amy (played by Kate Bosworth) to go braless, after she complains about men ogling her – which is what prompts her to reveal her breasts in the first place, because this time, it’s no accident. It’s a strange scene – if construction workers were ogling you, and it made you angry, would you take your top off for them in response? And then, the crucial point, even if you did, does that mean you’re “asking for it”? “I don’t know any woman that enjoys that notion,” Lurie said.

“To be honest with you, what intrigued me about the film is how gray it is,” Bosworth said. “I have so many questions about the original. And I have questions about our movie! I have questions about my character, still. It really is one of those films you never quite have the answers to.”

When the rape finally happens in this film, it’s more clear than in the first that Amy and Charlie (played by Alexander Skarsgård) have had a past relationship. “With Charlie, it’s not really rape,” Skarsgård said. “He thinks, there’s this woman, she wants him, and they’re going to be together forever. And when she rejects him, he’s like, ‘I offered you my protection for life. You said no. This is what happens.’ So it’s very primal, on an animalistic level. ‘You didn’t want that? This is what happens.'”

While Amy doesn’t fight back as much during the rape this time, her rapist is also much bigger. (Plus, he’s Eric Northman!) But she doesn’t treat it like ex-sex, either. “I think it’s a little more clear that she’s not enjoying this thing done to her,” Bosworth added. “That was more murky in the original.”

“Our leading lady is certainly much more fierce and more modern than Susan George’s character,” Marsden said, “and a little less ambivalent in that defining scene.”

While it’s commendable to not eroticize rape, as the original does, it leaves the remake without much of a point. Peckinpah’s “Straw Dogs” had an argument to make – an argument many disagreed with, but an argument nonetheless, about what makes a man a man, and what women supposedly really want. Does excising that leave much of a picture left? Lurie said it does.

“Our Amy is a fierce Amy,” Lurie said. “She’s a feminist Amy. She’s an Amy of 2011.”

Underworld

Under Your Spell

10 Otherworldly Romances That’ll Melt Your Heart

Spend Valentine's Day weekend with IFC's Underworld movie marathon.

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Photo Credit: Screen Gems/courtesy Everett Collection

Romance takes many forms, and that is especially true when you have a thirst for blood or laser beams coming out of your eyes.  It doesn’t matter if you’re a werewolf, a superhero, a clone, a time-traveler, or a vampire, love is the one thing that infects us all.  Read on to find out why Romeo and Juliet have nothing on these supernatural star-crossed lovers, and be sure to catch IFC’s Underworld movie marathon this Valentine’s Day weekend.

1. Cyclops/Jean Grey/Wolverine, X-Men series

The X-Men franchise is rife with romance, but the steamiest “ménage à mutant” may just be the one between Jean Grey (Famke Janssen), Cyclops (James Marsden), and Wolverine (Hugh Jackman). Their triangle is a complicated one as Jean finds herself torn between the two very different men while also trying to control her darker side, the Phoenix. This leads to Jean killing Cyclops and eventually getting stabbed through her heart by Wolverine in X-Men: The Last Stand. Yikes!  Maybe they should change the name to Ex-Men instead?


2. Willow/Tara, Buffy the Vampire Slayer

Joss Whedon gave audiences some great romances on Buffy the Vampire Slayer — including the central triangle of Buffy, Angel, and Spike — but it was the love between witches Willow (Alyson Hannigan) and Tara (Amber Benson) that broke new ground for its sensitive and nuanced portrayal of a LGBT relationship.

Willow is smart and confident and isn’t even sure of her sexuality when she first meets Tara at college in a Wiccan campus group. As the two begin experimenting with spells, they realize they’re also falling for one another and become the show’s most enduring, happy couple. At least until Tara’s death in season six, a moment that still brings on the feels.


3. Selene/Michael, Underworld series

The Twilight gang pales in comparison (both literally and metaphorically) to the Lycans and Vampires of the stylish Underworld franchise. If you’re looking for an epic vampire/werewolf romance set amidst an epic vampire/werewolf war, Underworld handily delivers in the form of leather catsuited Selene (Kate Beckinsale) and shaggy blonde hunk Michael (a post-Felicity Scott Speedman). As they work together to stop the Vampire/Lycan war, they give into their passions while also kicking butt in skintight leather. Love at first bite indeed.


4. Spider-man/Mary Jane Watson, Spider-man

After rushing to the aid of beautiful girl-next-door Mary Jane Watson (Kirsten Dunst), the Amazing Spider-man is rewarded with an upside-down kiss that is still one of the most romantic moments in comic book movie history. For Peter Parker (Tobey Maguire), the shy, lovable dork beneath the mask, his rain-soaked makeout session is the culmination of years of unrequited love and one very powerful spider bite. As the films progress, Peter tries pushing MJ away in an attempt to protect her from his enemies, but their web of love is just too powerful. And you know, with great power, comes great responsibility.


5. Molly/Sam, Ghost

When it comes to supernatural romance, you really can’t beat Molly and Sam from the 1990 hit film Ghost. Demi Moore goes crazy for Swayze like the rest of us, and the pair make pottery sexier than it’s ever been.

When Sam is murdered, he’s forced to communicate through con artist turned real psychic, Oda Mae Brown (Whoopi Goldberg in her Academy Award-winning role) to warn Molly she is still in danger from his co-worker, Carl (a pre-Scandal Tony Goldwyn). Molly doesn’t believe Oda is telling the truth, so Sam proves it by sliding a penny up the wall and then possessing Oda so he and Molly can share one last romantic dance together (but not the dirty kind). We’d pay a penny for a dance with Patrick Swayze ANY day.


6. Cosima/Delphine, Orphan Black

It stands to reason there would be at least one complicated romance on a show about clones, and none more complicated than the one between clone Cosima (Tatiana Maslany) and Dr. Delphine Cormier (Evelyne Brochu) on BBC America’s hit drama Orphan Black.

Cosima is a PhD student focusing on evolutionary developmental biology at the University of Minnesota when she meets Delphine, a research associate from the nefarious Dyad Institute, posing as a fellow immunology student. The two fall in love, but their happiness is brief once Dyad and the other members of Clone Club get involved. Here’s hoping Cosima finds love in season four of Orphan Black. Girlfriend could use a break.


7. Aragorn/Arwen, Lord of the Rings

On a picturesque bridge in Rivendell amidst some stellar mood-lighting and dreamy Elvish language with English subtitles for us non-Middle Earthlings, Arwen (Liv Tyler) and Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen) bind their souls to one another, pledging to love each other no matter what befalls them.

Their courtship is a matter of contention with Arwen’s father, Elrond (Hugo Weaving), who doesn’t wish to see his daughter suffer over Aragorn’s future death. The two marry after the conclusion of the War of the Ring, with Aragorn assuming his throne as King of Gondor, and Arwen forgoing her immortality to become his Queen. Is it too much to assume they asked Frodo to be their wedding ring-bearer?


8. Lafayette/Jesus, True Blood

True Blood quickly became the go-to show for supernatural sex scenes featuring future Magic Mike strippers (Joe Manganiello) and pale Nordic men with washboard abs (Hi Alexander Skarsgård!), but honestly, there was a little something for everyone, including fan favorite Bon Temps medium, Lafayette Reynolds (Nelsan Ellis).

In season three, Lafayette met his mother’s nurse, Jesus, and the two began a relationship. As they spend more time together and start doing V (short for Vampire Blood), they learn Jesus is descended from a long line of witches and that Lafayette himself has magical abilities. However, supernatural love is anything but simple, and after the pair join a coven, Lafayette becomes possessed by the dead spirit of its former leader. This relationship certainly puts a whole new spin on possessive love.


9. Nymphadora Tonks/Remus Lupin, Harry Potter series

There are lots of sad characters in the Harry Potter series, but Remus Lupin ranks among the saddest. He was bitten by a werewolf as a child, his best friend was murdered and his other best friend was wrongly imprisoned in Azkaban for it, then THAT best friend was killed by a Death Eater at the Ministry of Magic as Remus looked on. So when Lupin unexpectedly found himself in love with badass Auror and Metamorphmagus Nymphadora Tonks (she prefers to be called by her surname ONLY, thank you very much), pretty much everyone, including Lupin himself, was both elated and cautiously hopeful about their romance and eventual marriage.

Sadly, the pair met a tragic ending when both were killed by Death Eaters during the Battle of Hogwarts, leaving their son, Teddy, orphaned much like his godfather Harry Potter. Accio hankies!


10. The Doctor/Rose Tyler, Doctor Who

Speaking of wolves, Rose “Bad Wolf” Tyler (Billie Piper) captured the Doctor’s hearts from the moment he told her to “Run!” in the very first episode of the re-booted Doctor Who series. Their affection for one another grew steadily deeper during their travels in the TARDIS, whether they were stuck in 1950s London, facing down pure evil in the Satan Pit, or battling Cybermen.

But their relationship took a tragic turn during the season two finale episode, “Doomsday,” when the Tenth Doctor (David Tennant) and Rose found themselves separated in parallel universes with no way of being reunited (lest two universes collapse as a result of a paradox). A sobbing Rose told a holographic transmission of the Doctor she loved him, but before he could reply, the transmission cut out, leaving our beloved Time Lord (and most of the audience) with a tear-stained face and two broken hearts all alone in the TARDIS.

IFC.com’s 2011 Fall Movie Preview Guide

IFC.com’s 2011 Fall Movie Preview Guide (photo)

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Summer may be the season of the blockbuster, but September through December is where studios release their most varied titles. From sci-fi thrillers to dramas and potential Oscar nominees, Hollywood unleashes a veritable storm of A-list talent and often brilliantly original films. Here are our picks for the highlights of Fall 2011.

Select a monthSept | Oct | Nov | Dec

9/2 – “APOLLO 18″ (Dimension – Gonzalo López-Gallego – Sci-Fi Thriller)

darby2-05302011.jpgWhat Is It: Apollo 17, which launched in December 1972, was NASA’s last official manned mission to the moon. However, in December 1974, the Department of Defense sent two astronauts on a top secret, under-the-table kind of mission, and the found footage from that journey reveals why we’ve never returned to the moon since. What’s up there? Aliens? Ghosts? Russians? A bunch of sound and light cues? Or something even more terrifying?

Why We Care: We cry foul with the whole “the reason why we never returned to the moon” angle, ’cause if there was anything resembling life (or afterlife, or whatever it is) on that rock, we’d be up there every day and twice on Sundays with scores of military types, scientists, psychics, hippies, you name it. Still, the premise does succeed in giving us a bit of the heebie-jeebies, especially since it involves something as seemingly innocuous as the moon (versus, say, Mars, which everyone knows is crawling with nasty aliens). We’ll call it right now as a mix of “Paranormal Activity,” “The Blair Witch Project” and “Alien,” and we’re surprised the whole “found footage” horror gimmick hadn’t been translated to an outer space setting earlier — there are plenty of opportunities with such an approach to shell out some good jump scares (and rake in some decent box office) on a low budget. Let’s just hope “Apollo 18″ turns out to be actually scary, and if it has to have a twist ending, let’s hope it actually enhances the movie we’ve just seen rather than negates it.


9/2 – “SHARK NIGHT 3D” (Relativity – David Ellis – Horror)


darby2-05302011.jpgWhat Is It: Sexy and inexplicably/unnecessarily obnoxious young people show off their Hollywood-perfect abs and bikini bodies during a weekend getaway at a lake and find that sharks don’t need salt water to wreck havoc on the attractive. Sara Paxton plays (lest anyone be confused) a gal named Sara, a hot, smart and sensitive blonde who might last a little longer than any of her idiot friends — though, if you remember “Deep Blue Sea,” being “hot, smart and sensitive” doesn’t necessarily mean you’re completely safe from harm all the way up to the closing credits.

Why We Care: Because it’s called “Shark Night 3D,” which means there are sharks and when they bite people in half, that shit’s gonna fly out into your face. We’re not quite sure about that “Night” part, though, as every scene in the trailer seems to take place during the day — are we actually going to get some nocturnal shark attacks, or is that part of the title supposed to be meta-ironic-cool and stuff? Anyway, director David Ellis is right at home when it comes to this kind of outrageous mayhem, whether it be in three dimensions (“The Final Destination”) or not (“Snakes on a Plane”) — the only thing kind of disheartening is that PG-13 rating, which means the kill scenes won’t be too graphic, which seems a bit self-contradictory with this sort of flick (and, uh, basic premise). Maybe we’ll get a more visceral Director’s Cut on Blu-ray… and some more night scenes.


9/9 – “CONTAGION” (Warner Bros. – Steven Soderbergh – Action Thriller)

darby2-05302011.jpgWhat Is It: Famous movie stars get really, really sick in director Steven Soderbergh’s ensemble examination of a worldwide epidemic in which a highly dangerous (and wildly infectious) super-virus lays waste to the population and spreads fear, suspicion and panic. The impressive dramatis personae includes Matt Damon as a husband and father whose wife (Gwyneth Paltrow) is one of the earliest victims of the bug; Lawrence Fishburne, Marion Cotillard and Kate Winslet as three of the doctors racing against time to find a cure (or at least containment); and Jude Law as a San Francisco journalist.

Why We Care: Steven Soderbergh pulled off a compelling portrait of several characters from radically different walks of life all linked by a multinational crisis with “Traffic” (which, believe it or not, is almost 11 years old now), and “Contagion” looks like it could be just as powerful an examination (if a bit louder and more frantic). As usual, he’s managed to gather a terrific cast, and he’s already thrown us for a loop with the trailer revealing that one of his all-stars dies pretty early on. It’s good to see Soderbergh back where he belongs: telling talented (and expensive) movie stars what to do and delivering a compelling story on time and under budget. No more talk of “retirement,” okay. Steven? We kind of need you out here.


9/9 – “WARRIOR” (Lionsgate – Gavin O’Connor – Action/Drama)

darby2-05302011.jpgWhat Is It: Director Gavin O’Connor delivers a punchy Irish melodrama with this story of family and fightin’ (sounds pretty Irish, no?), as Tom Conlon (Tom Hardy), a high school teacher and former boxer, is trained to get back in the ring by his alcoholic father (Nick Nolte). And wouldn’t you know it — his opponent in a big mixed martial arts tournament ends up being his own brother, Brendan (Joel Edgerton). Jennifer Morrison plays what appears to be the only female in this story’s universe.

Why We Care: No other sport lends itself to serving as a backdrop for a good screaming/crying/hugging family drama quite like boxing. “Warrior” definitely isn’t a new story — we’ve seen many variations of it over the years, from “Rocky” to “The Champ” to “Raging Bull” to last year’s excellent “The Fighter.” But when this type of story is done well (and it often is), there’s nothing quite like it — nothing can get your blood pumping quite like a good boxing movie. “Warrior” definitely looks to be another entry in the “good” category; the casting of Nolte as a drunken Irish trainer is inspired, and the two stars, Tom Hardy and Joel Edgerton, are both about half a millimeter from complete and total movie stardom — this might be the film that makes them both Hollywood heavyweights. Director Gavin O’Connor’s last film, “Pride and Glory,” was nothing if not passionate and, rather admirably, completely and unapologetically earnest — expect the same treatment here.


9/16 – “STRAW DOGS” (ScreenGems – Rod Lurie – Crime Thriller)

darby2-05302011.jpgWhat Is It: “Superman Returns” couple James Marsden and Kate Bosworth reunite for this sweaty Southern gothic in which a Hollywood screenwriter and his trophy wife move to her Dixie hometown, where they’re promptly terrorized by her hunky thug of an ex-boyfriend (Alexander Skarsgard) and his gang of redneck ne’er-do-wells. A remake of the now-classic 1971 thriller starring Dustin Hoffman and directed by Sam Peckinpah, which was based on the book “The Siege at Trencher’s Farm” by Gordon Williams.

Why We Care: Because it’s certainly been a while since we’ve had a sweaty Southern gothic! The original “Straw Dogs” was a harrowing tale about a meek pacifist driven to arguably psychotic levels of bloody retribution when violent men invade his home (and wife) — it’s the kind of movie that made your stomach turn, as only Sam Peckinpah could do. They just don’t make ‘em like that any more, but this remake doesn’t seem like it’s trying to compete with its classic predecessor on any level, apparently content to deliver what looks like a well-made revenge flick that’s heavy on the sticky, dangerous atmosphere. This is a perfect role for James Marsden, who can pull off the crazy behind the eyes, and Kate Bosworth gets to prance around showing off her wet, scantily-clad body for the first time since “Blue Crush,” though this time in a much more sinister (and decidedly grown-up) context. And watch out for that Alexander Skarsgard fella — it’s only a matter of time before the “True Blood” vamp explodes and emerges Phoenix-like from his own ashes as a bona fide Hollywood superstar.


9/16 – “RESTLESS” (Sony Classics – Gus Van Sant – Drama)

darby2-05302011.jpgWhat Is It: Gus Van Sant’s oh so quirky melodrama chronicles the romance between a terminally ill cutie (Mia Wasikowska) and a weirdo who likes to attend funerals (Henry Hopper) whose best friend is the ghost of a WWII kamikaze pilot (Ryo Kase). No, we didn’t suddenly timewarp back to the ’90s; this bizarro indie flick was actually made in the past year — and if it doesn’t make you tear up at least once, you’re a sad, cold-hearted bastard who doesn’t believe in love (or ghosts).

Why We Care: Gus Van Sant could vomit on the sidewalk and exclaim “Hey, look at this!” and we’d probably at least nod and “appreciate” it. Few directors have been more idiosyncratic than he; he’ll try everything and anything without fear (or concern that it will make either sense or money) and yet all of his work is distinctly and recognizably his. It’s a good thing we love Van Sant so much, ’cause “Restless” (horrible title, that) looks like it’s going to require a lot of that love if we’re going to get through it without going into sugar shock. However, as ridiculous (way ridiculous) and obnoxiously sentimental as it looks, it’s also got Mia Wasikowska in its corner (or front and center, rather), which definitely goes a long way — and, through thick and thin, we believe in Gus, even when he tries to give us reasons not to.


9/23 – “MONEYBALL” (Sony – Bennett Miller – Drama)

darby2-05302011.jpgWhat Is It: A sports story on a low budget, “Moneyball” chronicles Oakland Athletics general manager Billy Beane’s (Brad Pitt) successful attempt to put together a baseball club by shunning the hopelessly dated insight of baseball “insiders” and instead using computer-generated analysis to create a sort of hand-picked “Island of Misfit Toys” of great players. He is a assisted by Peter Brand (Jonah Hill), a statistics whiz kid just out of college. Victory ensues.

Why We Care: The crusade of Billy Beane and his radical reinvention of baseball recruitment and management is one of the strangest and most interesting true-life sports stories out there. Really, this guy shunned decades-long traditions and practices and tried something so bizarre and out there that there’s really no way it should’ve not only succeeded but hit a home run straight out of the park and into the next neighborhood (figuratively and literally). Brad Pitt is the perfect choice to play Beane, and his knack for sly comedy should come in handy for his scenes with Hill, who looks to be doing wonders with what’s probably little more than a reactionary role. Add Philip Seymour Hoffman (who we just don’t see enough of these days) reuniting with his “Capote” director Bennett Miller and a screenplay co-written by Aaron Sorkin and you’ve got yourself an Oscar contender covering all the bases.


9/23 – “MACHINE GUN PREACHER” (Relativity – Marc Forster – Drama)

darby2-05302011.jpgWhat Is It: Marc Forster (“Quantum of Solace,” “Monster’s Ball”) directs the true-life story of Sam Childers (Gerard Butler), a former drug-dealing biker who found God and became a crusader for hundreds of Sudanese children who’ve been forced to become soldiers. Childers and his wife Lynn (played by Michelle Monaghan) founded and currently operate Angels of East Africa, the Children’s Village Orphanage in Nimule, Sudan.

Why We Care: Yes, thank you, Marc Forster, for giving Gerard Butler a role in something that’s not a lame romantic comedy co-starring Jennifer Aniston or Hilary Swank or whoever. Don’t let the somewhat goofy, “Hobo with a Shotgun”-esque title throw you off — the story of Sam Childers is a strange but true fable; whatever inspired a hard-drinking biker thug to drop his hellraising ways and go save the children in the name of the Lord can only be described as “miraculous.” Michael Shannon is in this, too, which is awesome, but we’re most looking forward to seeing Butler sink his teeth into his first truly lusty/juicy role since screaming (often) about Sparta as King Leonidas in “300.” Call this a Saul/Paul yarn for those who know their Bible, and Childers certainly knows his — and hundreds of kids thank him for it.


9/30 – “50/50″ (Summit – Jonathan Levine – Drama/Comedy)

darby2-05302011.jpgWhat Is It: A bittersweet portrait of dying young, “50/50″ tells the story of a 27-year-old who’s suddenly diagnosed with cancer (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) and how this affects his best friend (Seth Rogen), girlfriend (Bryce Dallas Howard), mother (Anjelica Huston) and, above all, himself. Determined to beat the odds, he befriends both his young therapist (Anna Kendrick) and several fellow cancer patients (including Philip Baker Hall and Matt Frewer). Directed by Jonathan Levine (“The Wackness”) and based on the real-life experiences of screenwriter Will Reiser.

Why We Care: Joseph Gordon-Levitt is fast becoming a national treasure. His performances in “Brick,” “Mysterious Skin” and “The Lookout” were all top-notch, and now he’s transitioning nicely into more mainstream fare with featured roles in “Inception” and the upcoming “The Dark Knight Rises” (though let’s just forget about his turn as Cobra Commander in “G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra,” shall we?). He owned as a punk rock guardian angel/trickster earlier this year in “Hesher,” and now “50/50″ looks like it could very well be his breakout hit. It’s extremely difficult subject matter handled with an Apatow-ian sense of humor and sensitivity — hopefully audiences won’t shy away from what’s bound to be an unapologetic tearjerker that won’t hold your hand through the rough patches.

Extra: Watch the “50/50″ trailer with exclusive audio commentary from director Jonathan Levine

Continue to October »

Season 6, Episode 4: Weirdos Go to the Beach

Oh My Goth

Watch Glenn Danzig Bro Out on the Beach

Danzig comes to Portlandia this Thursday, Feb. 11th at 10P on IFC.

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Those of us who donned a duster or a Doc Marten or two are likely familiar with the menacing gloom of Misfits founder Glenn Danzig. Big, beefy, and goth, the metal frontman casts a foreboding shadow over his slam-dancing minions. That was the case, however, until Danzig dropped by this week’s brand new Portlandia with a skip in his step and a smile in his heart. Why? Well, refer to his Billabong t-shirt and beach jam shorts and see if that answers your question.

Check out a bro’d-out Glenn Danzig and his love of frat boy beach gear in the video below, and be sure to catch an all-new Portlandia this Thursday at 10P on IFC.

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