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Sex in “Straw Dogs”: The remake of a rape

Sex in “Straw Dogs”: The remake of a rape (photo)

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In some ways, Straw Dogs is an odd choice for a remake – for a movie about “asking for it,” it certainly wasn’t. Nor, as Monday’s box office results reflect, was much of an audience asking for it, either. (It came in fifth place).

Sam Peckinpah’s 1971 original was reviled, most notably by Peckinpah champion Pauline Kael, as “sexual fascism.” A key scene – a double rape – provoked arguments about the director’s motivation, since the picture seemed to argue that the woman was “asking for it,” which Peckinpah himself confirmed in an infamous Playboy interview. (In that same interview, he also claimed that most women were whores, and if they weren’t, they weren’t being honest.)

So why remake a film noted for its misogyny? “That’s the very reason to make this film in the first place,” director Rod Lurie explained on the red carpet at a Cinema Society screening last week. He calls it an “intellectual exercise”: “How do you tell the same story, eliminate his philosophy, and put mine into it? Is it possible?”

Let’s see. For starters, both “Straw Dogs” are based on a book – The Siege of Trencher’s Farm, in which there is no rape, and the main violence is a home invasion. The rape comes about, in the original, partly because the female character, Amy Sumner (played by Susan George), has been walking around without a bra on and has accidentally revealed her breasts to some construction workers; but then upon realizing that they’re staring at her through the window, she lingers to let them look.

Her new husband, David (played by Dustin Hoffman), is presented as a pacifist intellectual, who isn’t around to defend her at the crucial moment – because he allowed himself to be tricked earlier, and failed to take a stand when the workers committed their first act of violence: hanging the family cat in the closet. When the first rape happens, Amy barely struggles, and even expresses pleasure. “People often asked, ‘Why is she smiling? Why is she cuddling with her rapist?'” Lurie noted. And the danger with that presentation, he said, is “there were young boys watching this film who went, ‘She said no, but he f—ed her, and she’s OK with it.'”

The rape scene was part of a larger issue, however – a philosophy Peckinpah believed in called the “territorial imperative.” “It said that all men are genetically coded to violence.” Lurie said. “And so the most violent among us are going to be in charge. The woman will not gravitate to the best man for them, they’re going to gravitate to the alpha male — to the biggest bull in the herd.” This is why, after the rape, Amy’s loyalty seems divided – the rapist seems to understand her more than her husband does, and she only seems to respect her husband after he kills several men defending their home.

“I’m not buying into that whatsoever,” Lurie said. “So what you’ll find in my version of the film, it doesn’t go that way at all.”

Lurie changed the setting from Cornwall, England, to the South, to place the action in a small town where football, hunting, and churchgoing are the major pastimes. “They have preachers talking about a vengeful God who will spite you from the earth; and the flood, and Armageddon,” he said. So while Lurie does not agree with Peckinpah that human beings are normally conditioned to violence, in this town, they are, “like it’s no big deal to them.” And his David (played by James Marsden) hasn’t been raised with violence in his life, “except what he reads in history.” (In the movie, David is scripting a film about the WWII battle of Stalingrad, a battle which was partly fought by women with brooms and kids with bricks, “a metaphor for everything that happens in the film,” Lurie said).

“We’re capable of violence if we’re protecting ourselves,” Lurie said. “So when David becomes violent at the end, it’s because he has to, not because, like in the Peckinpah film, there’s a rage being released that was there anyway.”

And when that violence at the end happens in the remake, David is not alone in defending his home. “By the end of the original, everyone jumps ship. Even his wife deserts him,” Marsden said. “In this film, they sort of stay together as a couple, and fight together. And throughout, they’ve had more discussion as a couple, like about the doors being locked.”

The couple also have more discussion about whether it’s appropriate for Amy (played by Kate Bosworth) to go braless, after she complains about men ogling her – which is what prompts her to reveal her breasts in the first place, because this time, it’s no accident. It’s a strange scene – if construction workers were ogling you, and it made you angry, would you take your top off for them in response? And then, the crucial point, even if you did, does that mean you’re “asking for it”? “I don’t know any woman that enjoys that notion,” Lurie said.

“To be honest with you, what intrigued me about the film is how gray it is,” Bosworth said. “I have so many questions about the original. And I have questions about our movie! I have questions about my character, still. It really is one of those films you never quite have the answers to.”

When the rape finally happens in this film, it’s more clear than in the first that Amy and Charlie (played by Alexander Skarsgård) have had a past relationship. “With Charlie, it’s not really rape,” Skarsgård said. “He thinks, there’s this woman, she wants him, and they’re going to be together forever. And when she rejects him, he’s like, ‘I offered you my protection for life. You said no. This is what happens.’ So it’s very primal, on an animalistic level. ‘You didn’t want that? This is what happens.'”

While Amy doesn’t fight back as much during the rape this time, her rapist is also much bigger. (Plus, he’s Eric Northman!) But she doesn’t treat it like ex-sex, either. “I think it’s a little more clear that she’s not enjoying this thing done to her,” Bosworth added. “That was more murky in the original.”

“Our leading lady is certainly much more fierce and more modern than Susan George’s character,” Marsden said, “and a little less ambivalent in that defining scene.”

While it’s commendable to not eroticize rape, as the original does, it leaves the remake without much of a point. Peckinpah’s “Straw Dogs” had an argument to make – an argument many disagreed with, but an argument nonetheless, about what makes a man a man, and what women supposedly really want. Does excising that leave much of a picture left? Lurie said it does.

“Our Amy is a fierce Amy,” Lurie said. “She’s a feminist Amy. She’s an Amy of 2011.”

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G.I. Jeez

Stomach Bugs and Prom Dates

E.Coli High is in your gut and on IFC's Comedy Crib.

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Brothers-in-law Kevin Barker and Ben Miller have just made the mother of all Comedy Crib series, in the sense that their Comedy Crib series is a big deal and features a hot mom. Animated, funny, and full of horrible bacteria, the series juxtaposes timeless teen dilemmas and gut-busting GI infections to create a bite-sized narrative that’s both sketchy and captivating. The two sat down, possibly in the same house, to answer some questions for us about the series. Let’s dig in….

E.coli-class-

IFC: How would you describe E.Coli High to a fancy network executive you just met in an elevator?

BEN: Hi ummm uhh hi ok well its like umm (gets really nervous and blows it)…

KB: It’s like the Super Bowl meets the Oscars.

IFC: How would you describe E.Coli High to a drunk friend of a friend you met in a bar?

BEN: Oh wow, she’s really cute isn’t she? I’d definitely blow that too.

KB: It’s a cartoon that is happening inside your stomach RIGHT NOW, that’s why you feel like you need to throw up.

IFC: What was the genesis of E.Coli High?

KB: I had the idea for years, and when Ben (my brother-in-law, who is a special needs teacher in Philly) began drawing hilarious comics, I recruited him to design characters, animate the series, and do some writing. I’m glad I did, because Ben rules!

BEN: Kevin told me about it in a park and I was like yeah that’s a pretty good idea, but I was just being nice. I thought it was dumb at the time.

ecoli-computer

IFC: What makes going to proms and dating moms such timeless and oddly-relatable subject matter?

BEN: Since the dawn of time everyone has had at least one friend with a hot mom. It is physically impossible to not at least make a comment about that hot mom.

KB: Who among us hasn’t dated their friend’s mom and levitated tables at a prom?

IFC: Why do you think the world is ready for this series?

BEN: There’s a lot of content now. I don’t think anyone will even notice, but it’d be cool if they did.

KB: A show about talking food poisoning bacteria is basically the same as just watching the news these days TBH.

Watch E.Coli High below and discover more NYTVF selections from years past on IFC’s Comedy Crib.

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Hacked In

Funny or Die Is Taking Over

FOD TV comes to IFC every Saturday night.

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We’ve been fans of Funny or Die since we first met The Landlord. That enduring love makes it more than logical, then, that IFC is totally cool with FOD hijacking the airwaves every Saturday night. Yes, that’s happening.

The appropriately titled FOD TV looks like something pulled from public access television in the nineties. Like lo-fi broken-antenna reception and warped VHS tapes. Equal parts WTF and UHF.

Get ready for characters including The Shirtless Painter, Long-Haired Businessmen, and Pigeon Man. They’re aptly named, but for a better sense of what’s in store, here’s a taste of ASMR with Kelly Whispers:

Watch FOD TV every Saturday night during IFC’s regularly scheduled movies.

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Wicked Good

See More Evil

Stan Against Evil Season 1 is on Hulu.

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Okay, so you missed the entire first season of Stan Against Evil. There’s no shame in that, per se. But here’s the thing: Season 2 is just around the corner and you don’t want to lag behind. After all, Season 1 had some critical character development, not to mention countless plot twists, and a breathless finale cliffhanger that’s been begging for resolution since last fall. It also had this:

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The good news is that you can catch up right now on Hulu. Phew. But if you aren’t streaming yet, here’s a basic primer…

Willards Mill Is Evil

Stan spent his whole career as sheriff oblivious to the fact that his town has a nasty curse. Mostly because his recently-deceased wife was secretly killing demons and keeping Stan alive.

Demons Really Want To Kill Stan

The curse on Willards Mill stipulates that damned souls must hunt and kill each and every town sheriff, or “constable.” Oh, and these demons are shockingly creative.

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They Also Want To Kill Evie

Why? Because Evie’s a sheriff too, and the curse on Willard’s Mill doesn’t have a “one at a time” clause. Bummer, Evie.

Stan and Evie Must Work Together

Beating the curse will take two, baby, but that’s easier said than done because Stan doesn’t always seem to give a damn. Damn!

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Beware of Goats

It goes without saying for anyone who’s seen the show: If you know that ancient evil wants to kill you, be wary of anything that has cloven feet.

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Season 2 Is Lurking

Scary new things are slouching towards Willards Mill. An impending darkness descending on Stan, Evie and their cohort – eviler evil, more demony demons, and whatnot. And if Stan wants to survive, he’ll have to get even Stanlier.

Stan Against Evil Season 1 is now streaming right now on Hulu.

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