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Dan Aykroyd claims “Ghostbusters 3″ will happen with or without Bill Murray

Dan Aykroyd claims “Ghostbusters 3″ will happen with or without Bill Murray (photo)

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Since Dan Aykroyd wrote a script for it in the 1990s, “Ghostbusters 3″ has been a source of near constant fan speculation and hand-wringing, and was only amped up with the 2009 release of “Ghostbusters: The Video Game,” which made use of some elements from that original script. Now, the impossible dream seems closer than ever to reality, with Aykroyd himself revealing quite a bit of new information on the film.

Coming Soon picked up on Aykroyd’s comments on a recent episode of Dennis Miller’s appropriately named radio show, “The Dennis Miller Show.” The big story? That the current plan is to begin filming in Spring 2012.

After complimenting the script and while acknowledging that Bill Murray was the lead in the previous movies, Aykroyd pointed out “what we have to remember is that ‘Ghostbusters’ is bigger than any one component,” explaining that the plan for the next movie is “to hand the equipment and franchise down to new blood.”

This passing of the torch will be necessitated by the physical states of both Aykroyd’s character Ray, as well as Harold Ramis’ Egon. While Ray is blind in one eye with a bad knee, Egon is simply too fat to get into the harness, which is either hilarious or depressing depending on how you feel about Ramis’ real life corpulence. Maybe both.

Of course, this wouldn’t be the first time that someone tried to spawn a new generation of Ghostbusters, as the cartoon “Extreme Ghostbusters” gave it the old college try back in the late 1990s. Like that new crew, “Ghostbusters 3″ is meant to feature a female team member, though there’s still no word on whether the group will be totally extreme (i.e., also include a black guy, a Hispanic guy and a dude in a wheelchair).

While there’s no official casting news to report yet, Aykroyd did state, “I like this guy Matthew Gray Gubler from the ‘Criminal Minds’ show,” which finally proves it for us: Only old people watch CBS.

Who would you like to see strap on the Proton Packs in “Ghostbusters 3″? Tell us in the comments below or on Facebook and Twitter.

Danzig-Portlandia-604-web

Face Melting Cameos

The 10 Most Metal Pop Culture Cameos

Glenn Danzig drops by Portlandia tonight at 10P on IFC.

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Glenn Danzig rocks harder than granite. In his 60 years, he’s mastered punk with The Misfits, slayed metal with the eponymous Danzig, and generally melted faces with the force of his voice. And thanks to Fred and Carrie, he’s now stopping by tonight’s brand new Portlandia so we can finally get to see what “Evil Elvis” is like when he hits the beach. To celebrate his appearance, we put together our favorite metal moments from pop culture, from the sublime to the absurd.

10. Cannibal Corpse meets Ace Ventura

Back in the ’90s,  Cannibal Corpse was just a small time band from Upstate New York, plying their death metal wares wherever they could find a crowd, when a call from Jim Carry transformed their lives. Turns out the actor was a fan, and wanted them for a cameo in his new movie, Ace Ventura: Pet Detective. The band had a European tour coming up, and were wary of being made fun of, so they turned it down. Thankfully, the rubber-faced In Living Color vet wouldn’t take no for an answer, proving that you don’t need to have a lot of fans, just the right ones.


9. AC/DC in Private Parts

Howard Stern’s autobiographical film, based on his book of the same name, followed his rise in the world of radio and pop culture. For a man surrounded by naked ladies and adoring fans, it’s hard to track the exact moment he made it. But rocking out with AC/DC in the middle of Central Park, as throngs of fans clamor to get a piece of you, seems like it comes pretty close. You can actually see Stern go from hit host to radio god in this clip, as “You Shook Me All Night Long” blasts in the background.


8. Judas Priest meets The Simpsons

When you want to blast a bunch of peace-loving hippies out on their asses, you’re going to need some death metal. At least, that’s what the folks at The Simpsons thought when they set up this cameo from the metal gods. Unfortunately, thanks to a hearty online backlash, the writers of the classic series were soon informed that Judas Priest, while many things, are not in fact “death metal.” This led to the most Simpson-esque apology ever. Rock on, Bartman. Rock on.


7. Anthrax on Married…With Children

What do you get when Married…with Children spoofs My Dinner With Andre, substituting the erudite playwrights for a band so metal they piss rust? Well, for starters, a lot of headbanging, property destruction and blown eardrums. And much like everything else in life, Al seems to have missed the fun.


6. Motorhead rocks out on The Young Ones

The Young Ones didn’t just premiere on BBC2 in 1982 — it kicked the doors down to a new way of doing comedy. A full-on assault on the staid state of sitcoms, the show brought a punk rock vibe to the tired format, and in the process helped jumpstart a comedy revolution. For instance, where an old sitcom would just cut from one scene to the next, The Young Ones choose to have Lemmy and his crew deliver a raw version of “Ace of Spades.” The general attitude seemed to be, you don’t like this? Well, then F— you!


5. Red and Kitty Meet Kiss on That ’70s Show

Carsey-Werner Productions

Carsey-Werner Productions

Long before they were banished to playing arena football games, Kiss was the hottest ticket in rock. The gang from That ’70s Show got to live out every ’70s teen’s dream when they were set loose backstage at a Kiss concert, taking full advantage of groupies, ganja and hard rock.


4. Ronnie James Dio in Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny (NSFW, people!)

What does a young boy do when he was born to rock, and the world won’t let him? What tight compadre does he pray to for guidance and some sweet licks? If you’re a young Jables, half of “the world’s most awesome band,” you bow your head to Ronnie James Dio, aka the guy who freaking taught the world how to do the “Metal Horns.” Never before has a rock god been so literal than in this clip that turns it up to eleven.


3. Ozzy Osbourne in Trick or Treat

It’s hard to tell if Ozzy was trying his hardest here, or just didn’t give a flying f–k. What is clear is that, either way, it doesn’t really matter. Ozzy’s approach to acting seems to lean more heavily on Jack Daniels than sense memory, and yet seeing the slurry English rocker play a sex-obsessed televangelist is so ridiculous, he gets a free pass. Taking part in the cult horror Trick or Treat, Ozzy proves that he makes things better just by showing up. Because that’s exactly what he did here. Showed up. And it rocks.


2. Glenn Danzig on Portlandia

Danzig seems to be coming out of a self imposed exile these days. He just signed with a record company, and his appearance on Portlandia is reminding everyone how kick ass he truly is. Who else but “The Other Man in Black” could help Portland’s resident goths figure out what to wear to the beach? Carrie Brownstein called Danzig “amazing,” and he called Fred “a genius,” so this was a rare love fest for the progenitor of horror punk.


1. Alice Cooper in Wayne’s World

It’s surprising, sure, but for a scene that contains no music whatsoever, it’s probably the most famous metal moment in the history of film. When Alice Cooper informed Wayne and Garth that Milwaukee is actually pronounced “Milly-way-kay” back in 1992, he created one of the most famous scenes in comedy history. What’s more metal than that? Much like Wayne and Garth, we truly are not worthy.

The ten coolest cars in movie history

The ten coolest cars in movie history (photo)

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This week’s excellent new film “Bellflower” features one amazing automotive co-star: the Medusa, built by the main characters in preparation for the apocalypse. The Medusa is a sick ride: it’s got two fuel injected exhaust flamethrowers, a loudspeaker intercom system, a roll cage, and even spews smoke screens on command.

In other words, this is one cool movie car. But where does it rank in the history of coolest cinematic automobiles? I’d put it just outside our top ten favorites, and by our I mean my, and by favorites I mean totally subjective favorites that you’ll disagree with and give me grief about. Here they are:


10. The Ecto-1
1959 Cadillac Ambulance, modified
From “Ghostbusters” (1984)
Directed by Ivan Reitman

Bulky, clunky, and old, the Ghostbusters’ signature ambulance isn’t the prettiest car to look at. Still, all that weird sciencey equipment designed to trap spooks, spectres, or ghosts, plus the great red on white detailing and “Ghostbusters” logo make it an eye-catcher. Plus every child who played “Ghostbusters” growing up in the 1980s does a dead-on impression of that unmistakable siren. Even better, I’m pretty sure if you had one of these and drove it around the streets of New York City in 2011, you would get laid faster than you could cross the streams.


9. Cobra’s Merc
1950 Mercury Monterey, modified
From “Cobra” (1986)
Directed by George P. Cosmatos

What 1950 did L.A. cop Marion Cobretti’s beloved Mercury Monterey come from? Definitely not ours. It must belong to some weird alternate 1950 where cars are designed to break the laws of physics: driving backwards down the highway at absurd speeds, rolling over other cars like a monster truck, jumping off parking garages like a parkour racer (a par-car?) and practically flying over the canals at Venice Beach. This unstoppable tank was still ahead of its time in 1986. Fifteen years before the first “Fast & Furious,” Cobretti had already outfitted his Merc with nitro for crazy speed boosts.


8. Cameron’s Dad’s Ferrari
1961 Ferrari 250GT Spyder California
From “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” (1986)
Directed by John Hughes

“Less than one hundred were made,” Ferris Bueller’s best buddy Cameron says of his dad’s prized 1961 Ferrari. In fact, the car was even rarer. Less than 100 were made of all the Ferrari Spyders between 1958 and 1963, at least according to this article on last year’s auction of the replica car used in the film. Cameron’s father — who understandably calls the Ferrari his love and his passion — would kill his son if he found out he was driving it. But the car is so friggin’ cool that no one would pass up that opportunity to take it out for a tour of Chicago. When Ferris, Cameron, and Sloane leave it at a parking garage, the attendants swipe it for a joyride too. And, man, do those arcing slo-mo jumps through the streets of the Windy City look beautiful.


7. Frankenstein’s Monster
1970 Chevrolet Corvette, heavily modified
From “Death Race 2000″ (1975)
Directed by Paul Bartel

It’s a car that looks like a lizard’s head with headlights for eyes and fangs for a grill. It runs people over. ‘Nuff said.


6. Stuntman Mike’s Death Proof Car
1971 Chevrolet Nova, modified
From “Death Proof” (2007)
Directed by Quentin Tarantino

The heroines of “Death Proof” obsess over a white 1970 Dodge Challenger, the same car used in the classic road movie “Vanishing Point.” And while the Challenger is an amazing car — and there are a lot of great ’70s muscle cars in many movies from that period — Tarantino’s homage trumps them all. That’s because of his unique innovation: the death-proof cabin. Supposedly “Stuntman” Mike McKay has outfitted his 1971 Chevy Nova (with unforgettable skull-and-lightning logo on the hood) so that it is, at least while sitting in the driver’s seat, “100% death proof.” It’s impossible, but imagine if it wasn’t? It would be mighty cool to drive that Nova. Maybe too cool; the feeling of omnipotence Mike gets behind the wheel was probably a contributing factor to his deranged psyche.


5. The Pursuit Special
1973 Ford XB Falcon GT, modified
From “Mad Max” (1979) and “The Road Warrior” (1981)
Directed by George Miller

“Mad” Max Rockatansky’s endless and endlessly awesome wanderings through post-apocalyptic Australia wouldn’t be the same without his Pursuit Special (see: “Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome”). It’s truly one of the most iconic cars in movie history: the modified black Ford Falcon body, the side exhaust pipes, the supercharger on the hood. In “The Road Warrior,” it was modified with booby traps and concealed weapons to help Max survive in the wastelands. The thing’s so sweet, it almost makes you psyched for the end of peak oil.


4. Bullitt’s Mustang
1968 Ford Mustang GT Fastback
From “Bullitt” (1968)
Directed by Peter Yates

Lieutenant Frank Bullitt’s 1968 Mustang might be the least flashy car on this list, but that’s part of its appeal. The fact that something so cool is (or at least was back in 1968) so attainable makes it even cooler. Yes, the cars used to film the movie’s masterpiece of a chase (see below) were heavily modified to withstand high speeds and big jumps, and throughout the nine minute sequence they drop more hubcaps than a clumsy chop shop stock clerk. But Peter Yates’ direction makes the scene just plausible enough to feel authentic. Bullitt’s car was a real-world ride. It’s easy to watch the film and pretend that if you’d been around back in ’68, you could have had one and been just as cool as Steve McQueen.


3. The Carmarine
1976 Lotus Esprit S1, modified
From “The Spy Who Loved Me” (1977)
Directed by Lewis Gilbert

Over twenty-two films, James Bond has amassed a car collection that would make Jay Leno drool with envy. Bond’s Aston Martin DB5, first introduced in “Goldfinger,” is easily his most famous whip, but for my money, the Lotus Esprit from “The Spy Who Loves Me” gets the nod as his best vehicle. It’s both stylish and functional. In a pinch, it can instantly transform from car to submarine; the wheels retract, fins extend, fans appear out of nowhere on the rear bumper, and a missile silo phallically extends from the roof. It’s quick enough to evade evil scuba divers and powerful enough to blow up a helicopter. Then when the coast is clear, Bond can drive it right out of the water onto the beach, scaring the hell out of some Sardinian sunbathers. Like the song says, nobody does it better.


2. The Batmobile
Bat-customized Chevrolet Impala
From “Batman” (1989) and “Batman Returns” (1992)
Directed by Tim Burton

There have been so many Batmobiles by now that it’s hard to pick just one favorite. The most recent “Tumbler” Batmobile from the Christopher Nolan films can jump and includes a pop out Bat-Pod motorcycle. The Joel Schumacher Batmobile could climb on walls. The Adam West ’60s Batmobile spewed fire from its oversized exhaust pipe. But the Anton Furst designed Batmobile from Tim Burton’s “Batman” and “Batman Returns” gets top marks for its sleek yet muscular body and its surplus of cool design elements. It can be remote controlled, responds to voice commands, and has pop-up shields to protect it while parked. The fanciful gadgets are off-set by some more blunt features, like twin hood-mounted machine guns, perfect for infiltrating Acme Chemicals.


1. The DeLorean
1981 DeLorean DMC-12, modified
From “Back to the Future” (1985)
Directed by Robert Zemeckis

How could it not be number one? The DeLorean was already a massively cool — with that stainless steel body and those great gull-wing doors it’s one of the few automobile designs from the 1980s that still looks futuristic — and then you add on the ability to travel in time and you have one bitching ride. Then in “Back to the Future Part II,” director Robert Zemeckis did it one better by turning the whole thing into a flying car and hovercraft. If God appeared before you and said you could have any car from any work of fiction, you’d pick the “BTTF:II” DeLorean ten out of ten times before He even finished His sentence. It’s the coolest car in movie history.


What’s your vote for the coolest car in movie history? Tell us in the comments below or on Facebook and Twitter.com.

Season 6 Episode 2: Going Grey

Come On Get Appy

Stream IFC Shows and Share Portlandia Emojis With New Apps For Android and iPhone

Watch a free full episode of Portlandia right now on the IFC app before the season six premiere on January 21st at 10P.

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Good news, IFC fans! You no longer have to drag your TV along with you on long commutes, to the gym, or anywhere else you want to watch our shows and Comedy Crib clips. With the IFC app, you can now stream Portlandia, Comedy Bang! Bang!, Todd Margaret, and other IFC programming directly to your Android or iOS device. There’s free full-length episodes, original web series, movies and show clips included with the app, plus even more if you have a cable subscription. You can nab the Android version here and the iOS version here.

But if that’s not enough for the diehard Portlandia fan, there’s also the Portlandia emoji keyboard — a virtual keyboard for Android or iOS devices containing a slew of show-themed emojis of Fred and Carrie’s characters, as well as recognizable items like a cacao bar and a certain messenger’s bike. Android users can grab it here, and iOS users can go here.

Want more, you say? How about a free full episode from Portlandia season six! Check in with Fred and Carrie before the sixth season premieres on January 21st at 10/9c right here on IFC.com or on the IFC app. As the kids say these days, one taste of Portlandia season six will have you like:

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