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The top 10 Fourth of July events in movies

The top 10 Fourth of July events in movies (photo)

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The Fourth of July brought independence to the original thirteen colonies that went on to form the United States of America. But it also gave us countless holiday weekends for movie-going. Thanks to the Declaration of Independence telling the Kingdom of Great Britain to take a hike, Hollywood now has both a day to release movies and a day to stage iconic scenes.

From marching band performances to alien invasions, the Fourth of July has meant many things to many films, but the directors who know how to use it correctly have delivered some of the most indelible images of Americana to ever grace theaters. Here are ten of the most memorable Fourth of July events ever to take place in those films.


10. The big parade, “The Music Man” (1962)
It may not be normal to see a marching band with 76 trombones in a parade today. Back in 1912, however, when “The Music Man” takes place, playing the trombone must have been about as common as learning to drive. In the end, River City assembled one juggernaut of a trombone section for their parade, and thanks to their efforts, an instrument retailer somewhere became very, very rich.


9. The signing, “1776” (1972)
After finalizing the Declaration of Independence and singing their way through every step the founding fathers rip one last page off the calendar on their wall and make their treason against England official. There’s not much humor left in the room by the time they finish arguing about birds and receive a somber letter from George Washington, but despite one last disagreement over grammar, everyone in the room seems to be satisfied with their choice.


8. Holly Hunter does the splits, “Miss Firecracker” (1989)
Only in movies could Holly Hunter ever have been an underdog to win a beauty pageant, but she shambles her way through the talent competition with series of strange acrobatics, and the moment she does the splits on stage marks the defining moment of her performance. Her spunk alone set her apart from the competition, but she really sticks the ending.


7. The Overlook Hotel Ball, “The Shining” (1980)
Here’s a weird one, and we’re not going to use this list feature to tell you how to interpret the final scene in “The Shining.” However, the photograph that Jack appears in at the end of the film clearly shows a rollicking party taking place at the Overlook Hotel on July 4, 1921. Presumably, something pretty gruesome occurred after that photo was taken, but how you understand everything that took place before the movie is your business.


6. Baseball After Dark, “The Sandlot” (1993)
In case the rest of this film didn’t get the idea across to you that Benny was destined for baseball greatness, while his pals were just playing for the love of the game, director David M. Evans threw in this scene. In a display of wide-eyed cherubic patriotism, the boys all forget to field the ball and get weak in the knees watching their town’s fireworks display. Meanwhile, the ball rolls gently into the grass.

5. Ronnie watches the parade, “Born on the Fourth of July” (1989)
As a little kid in Oliver Stone’s Oscar-winning classic, Tom Cruise’s character played with some seriously realistic-looking toy guns. He also attended a smoky small-town Fourth of July parade. The opening sequence for “Born on the Fourth of July” contains a few heavy, foreboding glimpses of the horrors of war, and it’s one of the most memorable depictions of the holiday in film.


4. Second Zodiac Killer attack, “Zodiac” (2007)
David Fincher gets his serial killer suspense ride off to a hot start as a young couple gets ambushed during a romantic lovers’ lane moment together in their car. From young victim Mike Mageau wearing too many shirts to the false alarm they experience when another vehicle drives by with some Independence Day explosives, the movie starts off at a simmer and bubbles over into a terrifying opening.


3. Shark Attack, “Jaws” (1975)
Despite ample evidence that a killer shark is on the loose, Mayor Larry Vaughn rolls the dice and leaves the Amity Island beach open to attract Fourth of July tourists. Predictably, this turns out to be a very bad choice, and a shark attack makes him quickly start to regret his decision. The rest is the stuff of summer blockbuster history.



2. Lou Gehrig’s Speech, “Pride of the Yankees” (1942)
Gary Cooper brought tears to the eyes of Yankee Stadium in his reenactment of baseball legend Lou Gehrig’s farewell speech. Cooper nails the monologue in his starring role, but the real piece of history in the background is none other than Babe Ruth looking on and playing himself. You don’t even have to be a Yankee fan to enjoy it.


1. The POTUS takes his stand, “Independence Day” (1996)
Bill Pullman made the Fourth of July the world’s holiday with a little help from a bullhorn in “Independence Day.” As Earth prepared to wave goodbye to its new hero Randy Quaid, the President of the United States revved up his troops to take down the ugly alien scum who had just blown up all of our landmarks. This is what watching a summer event movie on Fourth of July weekend is all about.

Did we miss one of your favorite scenes? Let us know below or on Facebook or Twitter.

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Inauguration Alternative

Bill Murray On Repeat

It's a movie "Murray-thon" all-day Friday on IFC.

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Photo Credit: Everett Collection, GIFs courtesy of GIPHY

Democrats, Republicans and Millennials agree: 2017 is shaping up to be a spectacle — a spectacle that really kicks into high gear this Friday with the presidential inauguration. Not only will the new POTUS swear in, but all the Country’s highest offices will be filled. It’s a daunting prospect, and to feel a little anxious about it is only normal. But if your anxiety is snowballing into panic, we have a solution:
Bill Murray.

He’s the human embodiment of a mental “Happy Place”, and there’s really no problem he can’t solve. So, with that in mind, how about we all set aside reality for a moment and let Bill take the pain away by imagining a top-shelf White House cabinet filled exclusively by his signature characters. Here are a few hypothetical appointments for your consideration…

Secretary of Defense:
Bill Murray from Stripes

His incompetence is balanced by charm, and dumb luck is inexplicably on his side. America could do worse.

Secretary of State:
Bill Murray from Lost In Translation

A seasoned globetrotter steeped in regional traditions who has the respect of the whole wide world. And he kills Costello in karaoke, which is very important.

Press Secretary:
Bill Murray from Ghostbusters

“Cats and dogs, living together. Mass hysteria.” Dude knows how to brief a room.

Secretary of Health and Human Services:
Bill Murray from What About Bob.

A doctor-approved people person who knows that progress is measured in baby steps.

Secretary of Energy:
Bill Murray from Groundhog Day

Let’s be honest, this world is going to need a lot of do-overs.

Feeling better? Hold on to that bliss. And enjoy a healthy alternative to the inauguration brouhaha with multiple Murrays all Friday long in an IFC movie marathon including Kingpin, Zombieland, Ghostbusters, and Ghostbusters II.

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Home Run

Hank Azaria Gets Thrown A Curve Ball

Brockmire Premieres April 5 at 10P

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Photo Credit: Everett Collection

Unless you’ve somehow missed every episode of the Simpsons since 1989, then surely you know that Hank Azaria is one of the most important character actors of our time. He’s so prolific and his voice is so dynamic that he’s responsible for more iconic personalities than most folks realize. Basically, he’s the great and powerful Oz — except that when you pull back the curtain the truth is actually more impressive. And now Hank is coming to IFC to bring yet another character to the TV pop culture hive mind in the new series Brockmire. Check out the trailer below.

Based on the following Funny or Die short and co-starring Amanda Peet, Brockmire follows the story of imploded major league sportscaster Jim Brockmire as he tries to resurrect his career by calling plays for a floundering minor league team in a podunk town.

The series is written by Joel Church-Cooper (Undateable) and produced by Funny or Die’s Mike Farah and Joe Farrell, meaning that there’s funny in front of the camera, funny behind the camera–funny all around. Sounds like a ball to us.

Brockmire premieres April 5 at 10P on IFC.

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Car Notes

Portlandia On People Who Can’t Park

Portlandia returns tonight at 10P on IFC.

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If flagrant bad parking takes nerve, then retaliatory note writing takes neuroses. Watch Fred and Carrie take passive aggression to next level in Car Notes, the new Portlandia web series presented by Subaru. The first episode is yours right here and now, and you can see every installment of Car Notes anytime online, on the IFC app and on demand.

Portlandia returns tonight at 10P on IFC.

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